• Expert Q&A: Rare dementias - Tues 3 March, 3-4pm

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    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

Suggestion for bedroom colours

Alex54

Registered User
Oct 15, 2018
194
Newtown, Wales
We have decided to move my wife (person with Alzheimer's) into a different bedroom, but I need to redecorate first. If it was left up to me the walls and ceiling would be white, but I do appreciate it can make a big difference.

So has anyone got any better suggestions than plain old white?
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,014
Scotland
FEBF0D38-EA15-49DC-9ABE-FAF2BDDEC318.jpeg Oh boy how I love choosing colours. In fact decorating is the only meaningful exercise I've had all year. I like a lot of white or pale cream but with splashes of colour perhaps on one or two walls. I did one bedroom with Farrow & Ball Lichen which is a lovely soft green and the other with F&B Cinder Rose.
 

Alex54

Registered User
Oct 15, 2018
194
Newtown, Wales
The site is safe, you can enable SWF if challenged.
Sorry nitram I could not get the site to work and I am reluctant to install flash as I have the computer working the way I want it to work.

It is very clear however that plain white seems to be the wrong choice!
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,365
South coast
I was going to be naughty and suggest ecru so that the stains wont show :confused::p

But instead I will say that OHs bedroom is Wedgwood blue (it is supposed to be calming), but blue can look cold if its not a sunny room, so I will suggest a green, which is supposed to be cheerful - we have Willow green with raspberry touches in the lounge.
 

chickenlady

Registered User
Feb 28, 2016
94
Whatever you do make the doors and light switches stand out from the walls so as to make it clearer how to get to the toilet, turn on the light etc. As the condition progresses the depth of visual field reduces so people can be prone to falling if the pattern on the floor makes it look like a step up or down, the same can be true of light switches that can become camouflaged if on a white wall.
 

Alex54

Registered User
Oct 15, 2018
194
Newtown, Wales
As the condition progresses the depth of visual field reduces
Good points and not that expensive either!
I have to leave the lights on now as she won't turn them on. Mind you she will get up in the middle of the night and not put on a dressing gown, occasionally I find her standing in the room freezing cold with the dressing gown nearby.
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,014
Scotland
@Alex54 you'll notice on that photo I included that I have sensor lights. Look at the skirting board beside the en suite door and you’ll see a light. I leave the door opened at night and there are sensors in there too. Mind you John has reached the stage now where he waits for me to take him to the toilet but the sensor lights are a good idea for the elderly in general.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,365
South coast
May I also suggest that you have plain (non-patterned) flooring?
People with dementia often misinterpret patterns as ridges and dips, or think that there are things on the floor.