Suggestion for bedroom colours

Discussion in 'I have a partner with dementia' started by Alex54, Mar 22, 2019.

  1. Alex54

    Alex54 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2018
    136
    Male
    Newtown, Wales
    We have decided to move my wife (person with Alzheimer's) into a different bedroom, but I need to redecorate first. If it was left up to me the walls and ceiling would be white, but I do appreciate it can make a big difference.

    So has anyone got any better suggestions than plain old white?
     
  2. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,738
    Female
    Scotland
    FEBF0D38-EA15-49DC-9ABE-FAF2BDDEC318.jpeg Oh boy how I love choosing colours. In fact decorating is the only meaningful exercise I've had all year. I like a lot of white or pale cream but with splashes of colour perhaps on one or two walls. I did one bedroom with Farrow & Ball Lichen which is a lovely soft green and the other with F&B Cinder Rose.
     
  3. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,827
    Male
    North Manchester
  4. Alex54

    Alex54 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2018
    136
    Male
    Newtown, Wales
    Sorry nitram I could not get the site to work and I am reluctant to install flash as I have the computer working the way I want it to work.

    It is very clear however that plain white seems to be the wrong choice!
     
  5. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,840
    Female
    South coast
    I was going to be naughty and suggest ecru so that the stains wont show :confused::p

    But instead I will say that OHs bedroom is Wedgwood blue (it is supposed to be calming), but blue can look cold if its not a sunny room, so I will suggest a green, which is supposed to be cheerful - we have Willow green with raspberry touches in the lounge.
     
  6. chickenlady

    chickenlady Registered User

    Feb 28, 2016
    94
    Whatever you do make the doors and light switches stand out from the walls so as to make it clearer how to get to the toilet, turn on the light etc. As the condition progresses the depth of visual field reduces so people can be prone to falling if the pattern on the floor makes it look like a step up or down, the same can be true of light switches that can become camouflaged if on a white wall.
     
  7. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,827
    Male
    North Manchester
  8. Alex54

    Alex54 Registered User

    Oct 15, 2018
    136
    Male
    Newtown, Wales
    Good points and not that expensive either!
    I have to leave the lights on now as she won't turn them on. Mind you she will get up in the middle of the night and not put on a dressing gown, occasionally I find her standing in the room freezing cold with the dressing gown nearby.
     
  9. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,738
    Female
    Scotland
    @Alex54 you'll notice on that photo I included that I have sensor lights. Look at the skirting board beside the en suite door and you’ll see a light. I leave the door opened at night and there are sensors in there too. Mind you John has reached the stage now where he waits for me to take him to the toilet but the sensor lights are a good idea for the elderly in general.
     
  10. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,840
    Female
    South coast
    May I also suggest that you have plain (non-patterned) flooring?
    People with dementia often misinterpret patterns as ridges and dips, or think that there are things on the floor.
     
  11. Sarahdun

    Sarahdun Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    339
    My husband has been in a separate room for a year or two now. LIke others I use motion sensitive lights to help him find the way to the toilet in the middle of the night. He has solid wood-effect floors instead of carpet to make cleaning accidents and spills easier - and minimal stuff around the room. The walls were already white and I did not repaint but I did take him with me to choose curtains and (much to my surprise) he had a very clear preference (for plain blue as it happens). One other thing makes him very very happy - my daughter bought him a battery operated light that casts a pattern of stars onto the ceiling for about 20 minutes while he falls asleep at night. He also wouldn't think to wear a dressing gown (or know what one was) but (for some reason) is always keen to put socks or slippers on his feet.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.