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Sleeping most of the time.

hspeter

Registered User
Mar 13, 2015
2
My wife has Alzheimer's and I am her carer. I have read a lot about the disease but seen nothing to compare with the way my wife's illness has progressed. She has been sleeping or resting more each day. Now she is only active about 4 or 5 hours each day. Although this makes life easier for me it is very depressing and I wondered how many other carers have a similar experience. My wife is 70 and was diagnosed with the disease just over three years ago although in retrospect she had symptoms well before that time.
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,025
Scotland
It's quite true that a lot of carers would love a " sleeper" as opposed to constant restlessness. However if you are looking for more stimulation for both of you I would recommend the groups run by the Alz Society. In the last three years they have been my salvation - stimulation for John, company, sense and empathy for me.
 

Grey Lad

Registered User
Sep 12, 2014
5,736
North East Lincs
My wife has Alzheimer's and I am her carer. I have read a lot about the disease but seen nothing to compare with the way my wife's illness has progressed. She has been sleeping or resting more each day. Now she is only active about 4 or 5 hours each day. Although this makes life easier for me it is very depressing and I wondered how many other carers have a similar experience. My wife is 70 and was diagnosed with the disease just over three years ago although in retrospect she had symptoms well before that time.
My wife is just the same. I think the brain is so overworked that more sleep is needed as the condition progresses
 

Chuggalug

Registered User
Mar 24, 2014
8,007
Norfolk
My husband slept for 23 out of 24 hours twice when he was home. He did spend more time in bed in the darker months. Around spring, when the lighter nights were coming, he would then be up and about for much longer. It seemed to be a seasonal thing with him.

The long sleeps were rather scary for me. After a couple of years, it got so I would expect him to sleep longer in autumn and winter. He probably needed the warmth as much as anything else. When I go to visit him these days, he still takes to his bed when I'm there but always gets up for his food.
 

Spamar

Registered User
Oct 5, 2013
7,058
Suffolk
OH could sleep 23/24 hours in later stages if he was allowed. It only happened at weekends as during the week something was happening every day, daycare, respite, etc, so I got him up.
My theory was that he obviously needed the sleep and I let him do it when possible. Another point is that, to a dementia patient, the world can be a scary place. Bed is safe and secure and warm - hence the best place to be!