Sharing a home

Chrismitch

Registered User
Jun 23, 2011
127
After seeing the loneliness of some, the excruciating care home costs, 'charitable' sheltered housing, etc, I think I've found a possible answer to the care dilemma.
I have found a five bed roomed house, all ensuite, two reception rooms, large kitchen, beautiful garden. I want to buy this house - along with three other people/couples. The fifth bedroom would be occupied by a full-time carer and the whole enterprise would be managed by me (with back-up, obviously). Other carers would come in daily to give care, meals, cleaning, medication, bathing, etc, as needed. Care to be paid for on an ad hoc basis.
During the day, day care could be provided for 5-10 other people and activities provided.
Not all residents would need care. People would bring their OH with them, thereby offering support for each other, respite, nights off to go to the cinema, etc.
If/when nursing care becomes necessary and people wish to move out to receive more specialised care, the OH would stay on of course if desired, or they could sell or rent out the room to someone else.
There must also be people with dementia who are rattling around in a large house, feeling lonely and in need of help? Wouldn't they benefit from sharing it?
I would welcome your views/feedback.
 

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
4,774
Salford
Total madness, look up the rules for "houses of multiple occupancy" you'd have to have separate kitchens as well as bathrooms, it comes with a nightmare of rules, safety checks, insurance issues and all the rest.
I think it's a good idea, don't get me wrong, in principle, I could never understand why my mother, her brother and her sister all lived within a couple of miles of each other but alone, they all got on OK, visited each other every week, went on shopping trips together but would they share? No way all valued their independence too much.
It's a great 1960's idea when we all did the Hippy, Hippy Shake and wanted to live in a commune, now sadly it's more the Hippy, Hippy Replacement and living in an incomune.
Still run it up the flagpole and see who salutes it.
K

http://england.shelter.org.uk/get_advice/private_renting/about_private_renting/houses_in_multiple_occupation_hmo
 

jasmineflower

Registered User
Aug 27, 2012
335
Hi Chrismitch
I have often contemplated this very option! I am in all intents and purposes an only child as my brother lives in Australia. I have my parents (still fit and active at 80 - I mean skiing and cycling active!!), my father-in-law - very needy, an uncle and aunt with no children and another elderly uncle with no children.

I've often wondered how I would be able to support them all and have considered that buying a large house with a sea view and rooms for carers might be the answer. It wouldn't be on a commercial basis though as I'm sure as you have to start meeting staff ratios, health & safety regs and food hygiene regs the costs would start spiralling.

Good idea though
 

Aisling

Registered User
Dec 5, 2015
1,807
Ireland
After seeing the loneliness of some, the excruciating care home costs, 'charitable' sheltered housing, etc, I think I've found a possible answer to the care dilemma.
I have found a five bed roomed house, all ensuite, two reception rooms, large kitchen, beautiful garden. I want to buy this house - along with three other people/couples. The fifth bedroom would be occupied by a full-time carer and the whole enterprise would be managed by me (with back-up, obviously). Other carers would come in daily to give care, meals, cleaning, medication, bathing, etc, as needed. Care to be paid for on an ad hoc basis.
During the day, day care could be provided for 5-10 other people and activities provided.
Not all residents would need care. People would bring their OH with them, thereby offering support for each other, respite, nights off to go to the cinema, etc.
If/when nursing care becomes necessary and people wish to move out to receive more specialised care, the OH would stay on of course if desired, or they could sell or rent out the room to someone else.
There must also be people with dementia who are rattling around in a large house, feeling lonely and in need of help? Wouldn't they benefit from sharing it?
I would welcome your views/feedback.
A lovely idea but I think it might not work out as loads of issues here eg insurance, health and safety etc. be careful.

Aisling (Ireland)