1. CHEZA27

    CHEZA27 Registered User

    Jan 8, 2015
    29
    Hello, I was wondering if anyone could shed some light on some of the symptoms that my mum has been displaying. She's got vascular dementia and only got her diagnosis in March 2014. Mum is unfortunately in a care home because my dad is unable to care for her.

    Just recently I've noticed that mum has been a lot more disorientated, confused and really lacks spacial awareness. The most worrying symptom is mum leaning to the left or right. We were shopping today and suddenly mums left side pretty much gave way, she couldn't really move it and was slurring a bit. I had to drag her when she was walking and also had to help her to avoid bumping into things. This really scared me and i couldn't really explain it to mum. I did that whole 'google the symptoms' thing and it told me that these symptoms are sometimes caused by mini strokes :( I told the home about this and they told me it was nothing to worry about. I'm not convinced that its all fine, and i want to know if mums getting worse. If anyone could give me advice, or experiences that are similar then i may relax a little bit knowing that what she's experiencing is to do with the dementia.

    Thanks ck
     
  2. 2jays

    2jays Registered User

    Jun 4, 2010
    11,603
    West Midlands
    I'm bumping this so some one, when they can, responds.

    No personal experience, only my thoughts from reading on here...

    It does sound as if mum had a mini "something" which shouldn't be ignored, it may turn out to be nothing, just the way mum dealt with what was going on... But my thoughts are it should be investigated.

    Once you have met one person with dementia you have met one person with dementia. Everyone is an individual and presents in their own way.

    What does your gut reaction tell you to do?? I've found it best to listen to my gut reaction - and to ignore that fluffing guilt monster. Gut feelings are best to be listened to, guilt monster don't bother listening to them... Guilt monsters haven't had dealing with dementia training ...




    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     
  3. Acco

    Acco Registered User

    Oct 3, 2011
    228
    I am not an expert so can only relate my experience in caring for my wife who has mixed dementia. Over the last 8 to 12 months there have been occasions when Pat has tended to lean heavily to her left side when walking, usually towards the end of our walk. Subsequently she started to stoop forward and adopt a shuffle rather than normal steps when walking. I initially put it down to exhaustion but have now come to understand that in her case it is the progression of the disease rather than some specific occurance at that time. In the last few months Pat has started to lean whilst sitting and today her walking is minimal and always assisted, and there is a tendency for the left leg to drag or collapse. A wheelchair has now become a necessity even in getting her from room to room in the house.
    I too have questioned in my own mind if she had suffered a mini stroke but her speech (effectively lost some time ago), expressions and responses have not changed so I concluded 'not so'. However, I understand that during progression of the disease, particularly in vascular dementia, there can be times when lack of normal blood flow to areas of the brain cause damage with consequent loss of function. Our GP and mental health clinician are aware of these changes, now very apparent, but neither has offered any solution or expressed a need for medical intervention, again suggesting it is expected progression of her disease.
    My wife is now 9yrs plus since diagnosis which is another factor in our situation.
    Whilst it may be that what you have seen is as in our case, I would recommend that you raise your concerns with your mums GP, particularly in view of the slurred speach and limited time since diagnosis. I hope the situation improves and that a visit to the GP provides an answer and peace of mind in knowing the cause.
     
  4. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,654
    North West
    I can understand your concerns ck as what you describe - the tilt, weakness and slurring - are things which might indicate something serious, particularly when they happen together.

    However, my wife who has had dementia for a long time and now has some Parkinson's symptoms, has been tilting, on and off, for more than three years. This is usually accompanied by weakness/floppiness as well. Typically, she'll lean to the left for a few days (standing or sitting) then straighten up for a day or two and then maybe tilt to the other side. Occasionally she tilts backwards or forwards which is much harder to deal with. Amazingly, she can usually continue to walk and climb stairs when tilting. The best that the professionals can come up with is that this is probably 'just' a dementia symptom which is probably what the care home have been told about others.

    So, it's certainly worth pursuing but may not be as serious as you fear.

    Take care.
     
  5. AlsoConfused

    AlsoConfused Registered User

    Sep 17, 2010
    1,955
    Mum (AD + VasD) often leans backwards - a real problem when she's being assisted to move from chair to somewhere else. Her level of functioning also changes a great deal from day to day.
     
  6. BR_ANA

    BR_ANA Registered User

    Jun 27, 2012
    1,084
    Brazil
    Talk with her GP. It can be an UTI or anything else. New symptoms need explanation.

    Is she on new medicines? Or any new herbal tea? Is this new symptom lasting days? Or it is gone by now?

    I remember my mom was worsened by a different allergy pill. (Reversible).
     

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