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Popular sleep remedies and hayfever pills 'increase risk of Alzheimer's

jimbo 111

Registered User
Jan 23, 2009
5,080
North Bucks
Popular sleep remedies and hayfever pills 'increase risk of Alzheimer's by more than 50%'
Sleep remedies, hayfever pills and anti-depressants are linked to dementia
The risk is greatest when high doses are taken over several years
Risk was 54 per cent higher for people taking the highest doses
Found a link between dementia and antihistamines Piriton and Benadryl
Link was found with sleep remedy Nytol and anti-depressant Doxepin
Also found with Nytol and Ditropan - treatment for an overactive bladder



Common over-the-counter hayfever pills could raise your risk of Alzheimer’s, warn researchers.
They found a link between dementia in older people and anticholinergic drugs, which include the antihistamines Benadryl and Piriton, as well as sleep remedy Nytol and some older antidepressants.
These medications affect the brain by blocking a key chemical messenger called acetylcholine, which has a range of functions in the body.

Study leader Professor Shelly Gray, of the University of Washington School of Pharmacy, said no one should simply stop taking the drugs without speaking to their doctor.
WHICH MEDICINES ARE LINKED TO ALZHEIMER'S?
Researchers found a link between anticholinergic medications and dementia.
Anticholinergic medications affect the brain by blocking a key chemical messenger called acetycholine, which has a range of functions in the body.
People taking the following drugs for more than three years have an increased risk of dementia:
At least 10 milligrams(mg) per day of the antidepressant doxepin,
Four mg per day of diphenhydramine (Nytol, Benadryl) or
Five mg per day of oxybutynin (Ditropan) for overactive bladder
For those taking the highest doses of these drugs, the risk of dementia was increased by 54 per cent after seven years, compared with no use.
The risk of Alzheimer's - the most common form of dementia - was increased by 63 per cent.
But she said: ‘Healthcare providers should regularly review their older patients’ drug regimens, including over-the-counter medications, to look for chances to use fewer anticholinergic medications at lower doses.’
Research last year linked the use of anticholinergic drugs with mental impairment in the elderly. But the new study, in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine, is the first to show that the higher the dose, the higher the risk of dementia.

Read more:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/a...ls-DOUBLE-risk-Alzheimer-s.html#ixzz3Q0lLjZEx



For those who don't like he Daily Mail

Hayfever drugs raise risk of Alzheimer's disease, say scientists
Scientists at the University of Washington say pensioners taking over-the-counter drugs like Benadryl and Nytol should tell their doctors and stop taking medication if it is not needed

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/sci...isk-of-Alzheimers-disease-say-scientists.html
 
Last edited:

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
4,771
Salford
could raise your risk of Alzheimer’s,
Note the word "could" when they say "does" then I'll listen when they can prove why I'll give them a Nobel Prize. As I've said before coincidence doesn't prove causality,
If for example people who take Piriton are at a much bigger risk why don't we see people on here posting about AZ and hay fever? Every day another story and everyone who thinks they can validate it will post comments on the Daily Mail or wherever so reinforcing the "facts" and we all end up thinking what is just a "could" becomes a fact.
K
 

jimbo 111

Registered User
Jan 23, 2009
5,080
North Bucks
could raise your risk of Alzheimer’s,
Note the word "could" when they say "does" then I'll listen when they can prove why I'll give them a Nobel Prize. As I've said before coincidence doesn't prove causality,
If for example people who take Piriton are at a much bigger risk why don't we see people on here posting about AZ and hay fever? Every day another story and everyone who thinks they can validate it will post comments on the Daily Mail or wherever so reinforcing the "facts" and we all end up thinking what is just a "could" becomes a fact.
K
Note my italics and underlining
jimbo


Hello Kevinl
I would generally agree with you on your comments about articles and responses in newspapers
But when the articles are backed up by studies from medical sources , whether backed up by ‘suggestion ‘or ‘fact ‘ is in my opinion worth noting on TP
I often post articles and I admit I tend to rely on the member reading the article in full and coming to their own conclusions
On this occasion the article warranted comment by Dr Simon Ridley, at Alzheimer’s Research UK and
Dr Doug Brown, director of research and development at the Alzheimer’s Society (see below )
I also post many threads on news of Alzheimer’s/dementia reports from medical sources
I believe that such information is ,or should be , useful and informative to members of TP who are dealing with the problems
jimbo




Study suggests sleeping drugs can increase risk of Alzheimer’s
Nytol, Benadryl, Ditropan and Piriton among the medications identified by scientists as raising likelihood of dementia

Dr Doug Brown, director of research and development at the Alzheimer’s Society, said: “There have been concerns that regular use by older people of certain medications with anticholinergic effects, such as sleep aids and hayfever treatments, can increase the risk of dementia in certain circumstances, which this study supports. However, it is still unclear whether this is the case and if so, whether the effects seen are a result of long-term use or several episodes of short-term use.

Dr Simon Ridley, at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: “This large study adds to some existing evidence linking anticholinergic drugs to a small increased risk of dementia, but the results don’t tell us that these drugs cause the condition.
“Continued research to shed light on these links will be important for helping understand the benefits and potential risks of these drugs. In the meantime, anyone who is worried about the medication they are taking should seek advice from a doctor or pharmacist before stopping a course of treatment

Read more
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/jan/27/sleeping-drugs-increased-risk-alzheimers
 

garnuft

Registered User
Sep 7, 2012
6,585
Just to add more information

There was an item about this on Radio 4's 'Inside Health' programme yesterday.
They contacted one of the Authors of the research to verify the percentages that were being quoted in the press...50%+
They discovered that the actual figure was roughly around 10% increase in the probability of developing dementia as opposed to people who had never taken any of these drugs... and that was ONLY in people who had taken the highest doses for the longest time.
It is the first item on the programme...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05077n8#auto
 

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
4,771
Salford
Note my italics and underlining
jimbo
Study suggests sleeping drugs can increase risk of Alzheimer’s
Nytol, Benadryl, Ditropan and Piriton among the medications identified by scientists as raising likelihood of dementia
Dr Doug Brown, director of research and development at the Alzheimer’s Society, said: “There have been concerns that regular use by older people of certain medications with anticholinergic effects, such as sleep aids and hayfever treatments, can increase the risk of dementia in certain circumstances, which this study supports. However, it is still unclear whether this is the case and if so, whether the effects seen are a result of long-term use or several episodes of short-term use.
Dr Simon Ridley, at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: “This large study adds to some existing evidence linking anticholinergic drugs to a small increased risk of dementia, but the results don’t tell us that these drugs cause the condition.

All information has a value but look at the bits in italic, can you actually say the medication causes the condition even they say it is "unclear".
I personally would wonder if the medical conditions people took these self prescribed medication for was a precursor of dementia, why do people feel the need to take Piriton or Nytol, maybe it's a symptom not the drugs that are the cause.
I'll be honest and say all these reports of a "breakthrough" depress me there's one in the paper every week and basically except for a few medications like Aricept which may or may not work we're in exactly the same place we were a 100 years ago.
K
 

jimbo 111

Registered User
Jan 23, 2009
5,080
North Bucks
Note my italics and underlining
jimbo
Study suggests sleeping drugs can increase risk of Alzheimer’s
Nytol, Benadryl, Ditropan and Piriton among the medications identified by scientists as raising likelihood of dementia
Dr Doug Brown, director of research and development at the Alzheimer’s Society, said: “There have been concerns that regular use by older people of certain medications with anticholinergic effects, such as sleep aids and hayfever treatments, can increase the risk of dementia in certain circumstances, which this study supports. However, it is still unclear whether this is the case and if so, whether the effects seen are a result of long-term use or several episodes of short-term use.
Dr Simon Ridley, at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: “This large study adds to some existing evidence linking anticholinergic drugs to a small increased risk of dementia, but the results don’t tell us that these drugs cause the condition.

All information has a value but look at the bits in italic, can you actually say the medication causes the condition even they say it is "unclear".
I personally would wonder if the medical conditions people took these self prescribed medication for was a precursor of dementia, why do people feel the need to take Piriton or Nytol, maybe it's a symptom not the drugs that are the cause.
I'll be honest and say all these reports of a "breakthrough" depress me there's one in the paper every week and basically except for a few medications like Aricept which may or may not work we're in exactly the same place we were a 100 years ago.
K
Thank you Kevinl
I think we have both made our point

Best wishes
jimbo
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
12,138
South coast
May I add another thing to the mix?

I read a paper about the effect of sleep on the brain recently (cant find the link) that looked at substances produced by the neurons during sleep. There was the suggestion that being deprived of sleep could hasten the onset of AD in susceptible people.

This could be why people who need to take sleeping medication are more likely to get AD.
Not that I am saying it is the cause. Just speculating really......
 

Peace and Truth

Registered User
Feb 20, 2012
17
Rutland
Benadryl hay fever remedy

My husband was never Ill, never took any medication EXCEPT Benadryl, a popular remedy for hay fever. Every Summer he used this to keep working through the hay fever season.
If medication is the cause of his illness, it makes me feel so guilty because I was the one that used to buy it for him. He hated doctors, chemists etc. so would not buy it for himself.
I really hope this is investigated fast, and if proved right the drug should be removed from sale at once.
Too late for us,because he is in the advanced stages of Alzheimer's and exists rather than lives.
 

MIKYPLUM

Registered User
Jun 8, 2012
10
I have been taking sleeping aids for many, many years, inc amytripilyn, now I have dementia, and am worried as whether or not, all this has caused my dementia, or is it, age related, as my mother died from it, now I am worried as to what to do, is it too late, to take a herbal alternative, and is ginko biloba, helpul
 

Pingu

Registered User
Sep 6, 2013
13
A follow-up article in the Guardian to this scare... You'll have to add another 'w' to the link and copy/paste it as I'm not allowed to post links here yet. If someone who is allowed to post links could re-post it, that would be appreciated. :)

ww.theguardian.com/science/brain-flapping/2015/jan/27/do-common-drugs-really-cause-dementia
 

Lyncus

Registered User
Oct 30, 2014
16
Warwickshire
My mum was prescribed Valium in the 60's and took it for many years. Mum also had electric shock treatment quite a number of treatments. She was probably one of the few that came out "cured" from what I would describe as Frankinstein treatment. I ofter wonder if this is a cause of her AD. Mum is 84 and in middle to late stages over the past 3 years. Mums sister who is early 80's told me she took the AD test and is fine, but did not not have mums medications and treatment, just food for thought xx
 

BR_ANA

Registered User
Jun 27, 2012
1,079
Brazil
I just try not to think about it. Depression is serious worry now. Dementia can be something IF I survive the depression.
 

nimbus11

Registered User
Apr 22, 2011
79
Hampshire
My brother in law who died at age 57 with early onset was addicted to otravine, he could not function without it, no family history of dementia at all - really makes me wonder....