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Physio exercises

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
13,964
South coast
OH has ataxia and is very unsteady on his feet, so he tends to fall quite a lot. He has been referred to the community physio for exercises to help with his balance and the physio turned up today. He was put through his paces, shown how to do some exercises and given written instructions.

Hes not going to remember how to do the exercises and probably wont even remember that he has to do them, so its going to be down to me to supervise, explain and encourage. Im not even sure that he will be able to do them properly, so its going to be a bit of a challenge. I guess that it will be about half an hour that Im going to have to shoe-horn into OHs daily routine.

Im already wondering what I can jettison in order to do it..........
 

CardiffGirlInEssex

Registered User
Oct 6, 2018
229
oh @canary , how difficult for you. Yet another example of the failure of the medical profession to understand basic issues that come with dementia. In theory physio can be very helpful, but not without the right resources to make sure it happens properly. It’s tough enough for a frail elderly person who doesn’t have dementia to remember what to do and how to do it correctly. How on earth do they think a PWD will manage, and why is it assumed that the carer can just step in to do it?
 

Dimpsy

Registered User
Sep 2, 2019
1,596
Hi @canary, you know my OH has had a couple of nasty operations this year and OH has been recommended to do strengthening exercises 2 or 3 times a day, to help improve his fitness levels, before operation number three.

Ummmm.

He won't do the exercises on his own, so we are doing them together!!
I stay calm and pretend I'm back at my yoga class, which stopped in March.
Namaste
 

Weasell

Registered User
Oct 21, 2019
760
I am sure if anyone
is going to be successful it will be you, but!
physios work very well with nearly the whole population, who understand ‘no pain no gain‘ , sometimes their wonderful plans work less well with dementia patients.
Should your OH quickly realise the plan is dry tedious, and start exhibiting challenging behaviour when asked to do the exercises may I offer a tip?

Dont say ‘ time for you exercises’ say time to play the ball game.
First sit them on a footstool or something with no back or arms.
This is an amazing exercise in itself. All the muscles in the core ( trunk of the body) go to mush when they are sat in an arm chair all day, this excercise puts them to work, and the person doesn't even realise they are exercising!
Then set up a bucket or washing up bowl and get the person to throw a ball or bean bag into the bowl. Each time you give them the ball hold it high in the sky causing them to stretch up. Lots of congratulations when the ball goes into the bowl.

I used to find that when I started the exercise routine in this way It was often more successful ( particularly with the men, what is it about men and any game that involves a ball?’)
Also if the routine involves planter flexion (pointing toes down) or dosiflection (Up) they can be easily done from the stool.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
13,964
South coast
I am sure if anyone
is going to be successful it will be you,
Ha! I am not superwoman! I never managed to get mum to accept carers and reached carers breakdown just before Christmas last year.

I did like the mental image of the ball in the washing up bowl, though :)
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,185
Scotland
I had exactly that experience with John. “Do ten of this and ten of that, walk here and March up and down there”. That is the gist of it and quite impossible. By the time the physio had gone out of the door John had forgotten he ever existed. I built in normal exercise eg by going for short walks up and down the garden path, walking down our stairs while holding on to both rails. In the end he had a fall at the care home while on a respite break. As someone said at the time all the attention and care I had given was of no use when he was with people who didn’t really know him and so didn’t see the danger of him getting out of a chair unaided.

This is a battle that is easier to lose than win. Nevertheless give it a go and best of luck.
 

Starbright

Registered User
Apr 8, 2018
535
My oh had a total hip replacement last December.... sadly it was not as successful as we hoped...I was always very concerned about the rehabilitation afterwards and told any medic that would listen to me, they all did and where very understanding . In hospital for 9 days and had 6 weeks after care at home with 4 visits from a physio. As soon as she left he’s back in bed and no amount of persuasion, in any form will he excersise.
I’m still trying with him sometimes but the effort it takes is just too tiring for him he’s 83 .@canary in fact it help me In the beginning.:rolleyes:
I agree with @marionq this is what I have found too that the battle easier to lose than win.
Wishing you strength .....A x
 

Pete1

Registered User
Jul 16, 2019
893
Hi @canary, it reminded me of the time Mum was supposed to have home physio following her discharge from hospital after a fall. I hadn't heard anything after four weeks and chased it through the GP surgery. A few days later I received a call from the Physio to say she had been out to visit Mum several times and given her some exercises to do! She had no idea Mum had dementia (I had requested to be there to let the physio in and to learn what needed to be done), and obviously Mum had absolutely no recollection of her ever visiting! Poor Mum could barely walk and had to struggle to the door to let her in (carers were using the key safe). I think we can classify that as an utter debacle and waste of everyone's time.

I did try to get Mum moving - but as you say it is very difficult, especially if someone is feeling pain too. But I know it is important as the impaired mobility causes more falls, the proverbial catch 22. But it is another thing to worry about. I think you can only do what is realistically achievable and only you will know that. I wish you all the best.
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,833
cornwall
I have had the same battle with dad. Four years ago and then last week. Physio came out to give him exercises to strengthen his legs and to try a new walker. He couldn’t use the walker. The physio asked if he wanted more exercises and how he was getting on with the other ones. Also would he do them. Dad’s answer “Probably not”! He is correct . He won’t and doesn’t. The physio said he wasn’t going to waste his time giving him more..If is easier to lose that battle than fight it. I find there is enough to worry about already. If dad cannot be bothered than I’m not going to stress myself about it..
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
13,964
South coast
Yes, @Starbright , @Pete1 and @TNJJ I think that we will inevitably go down the same path. It sounds like the same exercises @marionq

Yesterday I spent the morning sorting out OHs catheter, getting 3 lots of washing done (OH is into the diarrhoea part of his cycle, so had to wash the bedding and also clean him up again after the carer had gone), prep the meal for the evening, getting washing up done (was too tired to do it the night before) and try and tidy up. I had planned to get him to do the exercises after lunch, but I had a flurry of phone calls (none of which were social calls) and by the time they were sorted out OH had fallen asleep! He didnt wake up till 5.00pm and by this time I was deep into the usual fatigue (by 4.00pm Im wiped), so I got dinner cooked and after that had no energy for anything. OH did not mention the exercises at all and has obviously forgotten, even though I left the printed instructions prominently on display.

So that went well, eh? 😒
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,833
cornwall
Yes, @Starbright , @Pete1 and @TNJJ I think that we will inevitably go down the same path. It sounds like the same exercises @marionq

Yesterday I spent the morning sorting out OHs catheter, getting 3 lots of washing done (OH is into the diarrhoea part of his cycle, so had to wash the bedding and also clean him up again after the carer had gone), prep the meal for the evening, getting washing up done (was too tired to do it the night before) and try and tidy up. I had planned to get him to do the exercises after lunch, but I had a flurry of phone calls (none of which were social calls) and by the time they were sorted out OH had fallen asleep! He didnt wake up till 5.00pm and by this time I was deep into the usual fatigue (by 4.00pm Im wiped), so I got dinner cooked and after that had no energy for anything. OH did not mention the exercises at all and has obviously forgotten, even though I left the printed instructions prominently on display.

So that went well, eh? 😒
Sounds like a similar day to here. I know we all want the best for our PWD but sometimes (most) of the time it can be too much. I have been sleeping for 11 hours solid at mums and at home...Exhaustion definitely takes its toll @canary!
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,185
Scotland
One positive out of the physio @canary is that I adopted a tip for myself. I stand at the worktop in the kitchen looking out of the window at my bird table and do running on the spot. 100 steps with my hands flat on the worktop for safety. Not leaning on it but just in case. As winter closes in I am less likely to be out in poor weather so this is next best thing. I don’t want a fall but must keep
Moving.

Best wishes.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
1,285
Southampton
my husband has bppv vertigo when the crystals in his inner ear move. we had a leaflet that showed the exercises and needing to do them 3 times a day. i need to be there in case he gets dizzy and falls off the bed. i started with the best of intentions but i dont think we ever got to three. there was always some excuse why he didnt want to do them but most it was because he was tired. laying down and sitting up is quite a workout but he has copd as well so got very breathless. hes given up now and accepted he gets dizzy and we just have to deal with it