1. Expert Q&A: Benefits - Weds 23 October, 3-4pm

    Our next expert Q&A will be on the topic of benefits. It will be hosted by Lauren from our Knowledge Services team. She'll be answering your questions on Wednesday 23 October between 3-4pm.

    You can either post your question >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll be happy to ask them on your behalf.

  1. times

    times Registered User

    Sep 30, 2015
    2
    Hi i am having a PET scan in the next few weeks due to possible Early onset Dementia , I know after reading that the PET scan is only a diagnostic tool which can be used for possible signs of dementia as well as other tests which i have had done , but how accurate is a PET Scan ? if it is fairly clear does that mean i do not have dementia ?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    10,217
    Merseyside
    I'm sorry I don't know the answer but just wanted to say welcome to TP :)
     
  3. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,557
    Female
    South coast
    Hello times and welcome to Talking Point.
    Such a difficult time for you. I think you need to be guided by your doctor about this.
    Unfortunately, in the early stages scans (even PET scans) can come back normal even though there are symptoms and later scans show a problem. Scans are just one tool in the box when it comes to diagnosing dementia - other things are neuropsychology tests, memory tests, physical examinations (including blood tests) and sometimes a lumber puncture. The doctors will look at all of these things, not just the result from one test.
     
  4. Countryboy

    Countryboy Registered User

    Mar 17, 2005
    1,425
    Male
    Cornwall
    #4 Countryboy, Oct 1, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2015
    Hi if this helps I was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in November 1999 I didn’t agree that I had any serious problems mentally after a change of Consultant he sent me for a PET scan in 2003 I had to go to another County for this the scan was repeated in 2004 this time a SPECT scan the results of the Scans read Serious Loss of Volume on the Frontal Temporal Lobes { possible due to head injuries whilst growing up } hence my diagnosed of fronto-temporal-dementia however the diagnoses of Alzheimer’s wasn’t remove from my medical records and it wasn’t for the want of trying on my part

    PET (Positron Emission Tomography): A type of nuclear medicine scanning that involves capturing cross-sectional images of the brain, much like CT scanning. The images that are created are functional rather than the structural images of CT and MRI. Functional images capture how various parts of the brain are working, which makes it a diagnostic tool for neurodegenerative conditions such as fronto-temporal-dementia . Areas of the frontal or temporal lobes that are not as active as they should be may indicate FTD.

    The PET scan involves the injection of a radioisotope, or tracer, into a hand or arm vein. The tracer emits positrons, which collide with electrons, or negatively charged particles, producing gamma rays which are similar to X-rays. These gamma rays are detected by a ring-shaped PET scanner and analyzed by a computer to form an image of brain metabolism. These tests are very expensive and not covered by all insurance policies. Check with your insurance provider to see what tests are covered or if pre-approval is needed.

    SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography): A type of nuclear medicine scanning that is very similar to PET. SPECT measures blood flow and activity levels in the brain, which make it a diagnostic tool for identifying behavioral and cognitive problems in persons with neurodegenerative conditions such as FTD.
    SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography): PET (Positron Emission Tomography): A type of nuclear medicine scanning that is very similar to PET. SPECT measures blood flow and activity levels in the brain, which make it a diagnostic tool for identifying behavioral and cognitive problems in persons with neurodegenerative conditions such as FTD.

    best not to worry im now 72+ and fit and well not bothered about things i forget I just have a few swear words and move on
     
  5. times

    times Registered User

    Sep 30, 2015
    2
    Thankyou

    Thank-you cat27 , canary & Tony for the welcome and replies the information really did help.
     

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