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Paying for shortfall in fees

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Azay28, Aug 9, 2019.

  1. Azay28

    Azay28 Registered User

    Nov 21, 2015
    95
    Hi all
    Does anyone know what happens if you are unable to meet the shortfall in fees for your PWD?

    If there is a difference between their pension/income plus the council funding and the cost of fees and you are asked to sign a contract to cover the shortfall, what happens if you don't sign because you cannot pay this money.
     
  2. Bunpoots

    Bunpoots Registered User

    Apr 1, 2016
    3,343
    Nottinghamshire
    Hello @Azay28

    If you can't afford to pay don't sign the form. The LA have to find somewhere suitable for your PWD which will not require a top-up. You will have to accept their choice of home though.
     
  3. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,746
    Female
    London
    You can't ever be forced to pay top-up fees unless you caused them by choosing a bigger nicer room or something, so don't sign anything! It's up to the council to figure this out.
     
  4. Azay28

    Azay28 Registered User

    Nov 21, 2015
    95
    Thank you both Bunpoots and Beate I appreciate your replies. I'm not quite in this situation yet but know it can happen and wanted to be prepared as moving to a care home is getting closer. It helps me to decide what i need to look for in a home.
     
  5. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,795
    Female
    South coast
    When you go and look at care homes you can ask them outright whether they accept the LA rates, or whether they require a "top-up" fee.

    Also, when you look, dont be blinded by "bells and whistles". My mum didnt need a spa, cinema, bistro or fancy decor.
    The place that my mum was in was shabby and basic, but the carers were excellent. They had a program of activities (usually in the morning) and outings for those who were capable of going out. They had a visiting hairdresser, chiropodist and optician who were all used to dealing with dementia.. Mum was self funding, but had she outlived her savings, then the care home would have accepted the LA rate. When you look around, check to make sure that there are always staff and the residents are not left unattended. Be brutally honest about what your person with dementia is like as some places will only accept people in the early, easy stages of dementia. Try and see past the decor and go for somewhere homely (rather than looking like a hotel) with good care.

    SS aught to be able to give you the name of at least one care home that will accept LA rates.
     
  6. Azay28

    Azay28 Registered User

    Nov 21, 2015
    95
    Such good advice and my own thoughts exactly. Both my aunt and mum in law are in homes and one is very much the shabby with good care and the other all bells and whistles (as she can afford) but also has good care. I've already seen the homely ones and they will suit my mum so much better anyway. I have now been pointed to SS department to help with the search so thanks for your tips too Canary. All made note of
     

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