Occupational Therapist visit

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by emscub, Apr 26, 2004.

  1. emscub

    emscub Registered User

    Dec 5, 2003
    124
    Bath
    Hi all,

    We had the occupational therapist come today - not that any of us saw her!
    We got the letter on Friday 23rd saying she was coming today (26th) - not exactly enough time for any of us to arrange to be here!

    My Mum, however, did manage to speak to her on the phone this morning before the arranged visit to tell her not to bother but she said she'd still come and would phone my Mum about the visit later this week. I've just got home and my Nan said that two women came earlier. I asked her what they'd said and she said it was something to do with religion! Guess they must be trying new training strategies for therapists - you've got to laugh!

    At first we were a bit worried about not being there for the visit but I think, in a way, it will be good for them to see my Nan without my Mum around as it's bound to make her more confused if my Mum isn't there for her to re-direct their questions to. Not really sure what they actually came for, but my Mum asked them specifically this morning to see whether they thought my Nan was safe to be left at home on her own every day. We're all really worried about this, but it seems there's not a lot we can do until day care can be arranged.

    Has anyone got any previous experience with O. therapists and what they actually do/did for you?
     
  2. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    I have no experience with OTs that would be helpful, but I know that we do protect our loved ones during such visits, which may be more painful for the family than for the person being visited.

    It is awful to see them struggling with the simplest of questions, and even though we know it is in their interests to have the true extent of their condition recognised, it is natural to try and interpret or help.

    I think it may have been a good thing for you not to have been present.

    But do make sure that the results are fed back to you in their entirety.
     
  3. Jenny M

    Jenny M Registered User

    Sep 15, 2003
    11
    Barnet
    My Mum went into hospital in September for a routine matter which should have only kept her in for a day or two. while she was there, the staff became increasingly concerned about her confusion and therefore her ability to manage if she was discharged to live alone, as she did before going into hospital. She was therefore referred to the hospital OT for an assessment of her capabilities. This involved taking her to an assessment unit in the hospital with kitchen facilities where she was asked to do a few simple tasks, e.g. making a cup of tea. I wasn't present for the assessment, but the OT phoned me afterwards and said that, based upon what she had seen of my Mum's actions in the assessment unit, she had concerns about her ability to live independently. She reported her findings to the hospital social workers, and this ultimately led to her being found a residential care place. I think that OTs look at a person's ability to cope with everyday tasks. If possible, they will suggest ways of allowing the person to continue to live independently, such as installing safety & mobility aids into their home. Where this isn't possible, as in my Mum's case, they may assist with the decision to allow the person to get a local authority funded permanent care placement. I hope this is some help. Good Luck.
    Jenny
     
  4. emscub

    emscub Registered User

    Dec 5, 2003
    124
    Bath
    The thing is that my Nan has lived with us for about six years or so now, so we weren't actually sure why she would need tests to see what she could/couldn't do as we pretty much do everything now as she becomes less and less interested/capable of doing things herself.

    As I think I mentioned before, my Mum did mention on the phone that she would like the OT to assess whether she thought my Nan should be left at home all day on her own. I'm not sure that this was what they were initially coming for though.

    To date we haven't heard from the OT so don't know what the findings were but she said she'd phone my Mum so hopefully we'll know soon.

    I'm becoming increasingly worried about my Nan. For the last few days her blood sugar level has been constantly high - was 15.5 on Monday night and meant to be between 5-7 (she's diabetic), and all she's done is sleep (we had to wake her to give her lunch yesterday). In total she was awake for perhaps an hour yesterday. She was completely confused on Monday night also - didn't know what time of day it was and couldn't comprehend anything we said to her. I'm not sure what to do and neither is my Mum as last time her sugar levels were high we phoned the NHS direct line and they told us to leave her. It just doesn't seem right that she's suddenly gone like this.

    Does anyone else have any experiences with diabetes?
     
  5. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Whenever anything new happens with someone like your Nan, I believe it is a good thing to get an outside opinion - GP, for instance.

    When we care for someone at home, caring needs can slowly escalate over time without our noticing, since we just expand to fill the needs.....to a point.

    Although you know your Nan's care needs, it is a good thing to have someone independently test to gain their view. It will be helpful in the long term since these things will be on record, and there won't be a need to rush to get tests done, perhaps in a time of more critical need.

    Diabetes is a whole issue on its own and I would recommend getting a GP's view on her in that area anyway, given your current symptoms.

    My experience of NHS Direct is minimal but the occasion we have used them it was a waste of time and we had to use our own common sense instead. Besides having to wait a couple of hours with someone who has a dicky heart and new medication that was sending her temperature really high, plus a 4 times overactive thyroid and a pulse rate of 105, the most we got from NHS Direct was a call after the 2 hours saying they would call back some time later.

    GPs are there to be called upon when needed.....
     

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