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Mum sleeping for many hours a day

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
Good afternoon folks my Mum has dementia and has recently been treated for a urine infection. my mother is now spending many hours a day in bed sleeping. She has to be asked several times to get up and does not wash much. She will only allow carers to help her wash occasionally. We keep asking her to wash and lay fresh clothes out for her but these tactics are not working.Can any one offer other suggestions.Thank you. haygreen
 

Bunpoots

Volunteer Host
Apr 1, 2016
3,822
Nottinghamshire
I'm afraid this is common @haygreen. My dad would get up (not very early though) and would then spend most of the day asleep in his chair!

If her carers are well versed in dementia care they should know what sort of tactics to try...but sometimes nothing will work. If it carries on it might be worth checking that the infection has gone.
 

Fullticket

Registered User
Apr 19, 2016
475
Chard, Somerset
We had carers in on weekday mornings to get mum up and out but ,as the dementia progressed, at weekends she would spend all the time in bed asleep. After a while we didn't worry about getting her up as she would have been upset and so would I. She would happily sleep Friday evening through to Monday morning without realising that there had been a Saturday and a Sunday in between. Providing your mum does not have an infection and providing she is well hydrated I would go with the flow. I found that the carers were far better at getting her showered/washed than I was so I didn't worry about washing or teeth cleaning at weekends but just let mum get on with it.
 

Duggies-girl

Registered User
Sep 6, 2017
1,787
Dad is the same. If I didn't badger him into getting up he would stay in bed all week. Once he is up, he goes to sleep in his chair.

He eats and drinks okay so no worries there. It would be easy to let him stay in bed but I feel that could lead to a slippery slope.

I don't know what to think really.
 

myss

Registered User
Jan 14, 2018
431
My dad's also another who can sleep for a long amount of time and at times he's all for having a wash and another time he refuses, in a battle between sleep and washing, for him sleeping comes first and to be honest I'm happy that he feels that way.

Most times we've used wipes or washing up bowl & flannel to clean him. As dementia can change the behaviour/thoughts/etc of a pwd like a switch, there has been times when dad's been asked to come to the bath for a wash and he's reluctant, only to ask him again 5 minutes later like it's the first time he's being asked and he's all for it! You could try that!
 

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
I'm afraid this is common @haygreen. My dad would get up (not very early though) and would then spend most of the day asleep in his chair!

If her carers are well versed in dementia care they should know what sort of tactics to try...but sometimes nothing will work. If it carries on it might be worth checking that the infection has gone.
 

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
We had carers in on weekday mornings to get mum up and out but ,as the dementia progressed, at weekends she would spend all the time in bed asleep. After a while we didn't worry about getting her up as she would have been upset and so would I. She would happily sleep Friday evening through to Monday morning without realising that there had been a Saturday and a Sunday in between. Providing your mum does not have an infection and providing she is well hydrated I would go with the flow. I found that the carers were far better at getting her showered/washed than I was so I didn't worry about washing or teeth cleaning at weekends but just let mum get on with it.
 

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
We had carers in on weekday mornings to get mum up and out but ,as the dementia progressed, at weekends she would spend all the time in bed asleep. After a while we didn't worry about getting her up as she would have been upset and so would I. She would happily sleep Friday evening through to Monday morning without realising that there had been a Saturday and a Sunday in between. Providing your mum does not have an infection and providing she is well hydrated I would go with the flow. I found that the carers were far better at getting her showered/washed than I was so I didn't worry about washing or teeth cleaning at weekends but just let mum get on with it.
 

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
Full ticket thank you for taking the time to post such a useful reply to my query. I am very grateful. Haygreen
 

Champers

Registered User
Jan 3, 2019
225
Is your mum in her own home?

Interestingly, when my mother was living alone, she would sleep for hours and hours. So much so that I often couldn’t get hold of her on the phone and would have to call neighbours to check she was ok. Since she’s been in a CH, her sleep patterns are more appropriate. I put it down to the fact that there’s always something ‘interesting’ going on in the CH whereas, at home, things were fairly routine.
 

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
We had carers in on weekday mornings to get mum up and out but ,as the dementia progressed, at weekends she would spend all the time in bed asleep. After a while we didn't worry about getting her up as she would have been upset and so would I. She would happily sleep Friday evening through to Monday morning without realising that there had been a Saturday and a Sunday in between. Providing your mum does not have an infection and providing she is well hydrated I would go with the flow. I found that the carers were far better at getting her showered/washed than I was so I didn't worry about washing or teeth cleaning at weekends but just let mum get on with it.
Bbj
Washing is nice but not critical.
There is Alzheimer's info on this plus a lot more with a web search:
https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/daily-living/when-someone-dementia-reluctant-wash#content-start


Is she eating and drinking?
 

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
BryanG200 thank you for your kind reply to my. Query.I am sorry I've taken so long to thank you. Haygreen
 

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
My dad's also another who can sleep for a long amount of time and at times he's all for having a wash and another time he refuses, in a battle between sleep and washing, for him sleeping comes first and to be honest I'm happy that he feels that way.

Most times we've used wipes or washing up bowl & flannel to clean him. As dementia can change the behaviour/thoughts/etc of a pwd like a switch, there has been times when dad's been asked to come to the bath for a wash and he's reluctant, only to ask him again 5 minutes later like it's the first time he's being asked and he's all for it! You could try that!
 

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
miss thank you for your helpful reply to my query and sorry I have taken so long to thank you...Haygreen
 

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
Champers thank
Is your mum in her own home?

Interestingly, when my mother was living alone, she would sleep for hours and hours. So much so that I often couldn’t get hold of her on the phone and would have to call neighbours to check she was ok. Since she’s been in a CH, her sleep patterns are more appropriate. I put it down to the fact that there’s always something ‘interesting’ going on in the CH whereas, at home, things were fairly routine.
you
 

haygreen

Registered User
Sep 13, 2017
68
Champers thank you for your reply to my query.Mum lives in her own home and seems to resent carers coming into the house so I can get respite. I am asking Mums carers to try and get her up each day with little success.I do take her out and try and stimulate her bu t with little success...Haygreen