1. lesley2

    lesley2 Registered User

    Mar 17, 2005
    3
    furness, Cumbria
    Am trying to find out for someone who doesn't have internet if anyone has come across people with Alzheimer's having periods of up to two hours in which mouth seems to go rigid. The lady in question can't speak at this time even though she tries to and her husband wants to know whether anyone else has come across this. He's talked to GP who doesn't seem particularly concerned, but he's still worried. Can anyone help?
     
  2. gemini

    gemini Registered User

    Sep 8, 2003
    69
    Nottingham
    #2 gemini, Mar 18, 2005
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2005
    Hi Leslie

    My Mum in law suffers from AD and she also has mouth spasms, although in not quite the same that you discribe. None of the family can ever remember this happening before the on set of the disease so we're pretty sure it is related in some way to the illness. Her bottom lip will drop repeatedly down to one side, almost like a nervous 'twitch'. It doesn't last very long so at the moment doesn't affect her speech. At first this would happen when she was very tense and/or confused. However, we have noticed that as her illness progresses, it is becoming increasingly more frequent and noticable. We've never mentioned it to her and are convinced she is totally unaware of it. I hope this helps.

    Best wishes
    Gemini
     
  3. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Jan's jaw goes rigid and she tries to talk that way, but this just means she grinds all her teeth together in a way that makes me cringe. She doesn't seem to feel anything bad though.
     
  4. lesley2

    lesley2 Registered User

    Mar 17, 2005
    3
    furness, Cumbria
    Hi
    Thanks for that. I'll pass your comments on to the gentleman who asked me.
    Lesley
     

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