1. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia
    I wonder if other TPers could share their experiences of loss of mobility with me? Mum has AD and broke her hip in December 2005. She made a good recovery and was back to walking unaided around her Hostel room and relying on her stick for longer walks (eg. to the dining room).

    Over the last month her walking ability has deteriorated drastically, for no apparent physical reason so I think it is part of the AD. She can no longer walk without her stick in one hand and a support (person or rail) in the other. Also shuffles a lot more and is more bent over. This has been quite sudden but is very noticeable and even Mum has noticed it.

    There has not been a corresponding drop in other areas (eg. memory, etc.) but she is still declining steadily in these areas. Like so many I read about on TP, she has her good days and her bad days, but the mobility is on a downward slope fast.

    Have others experienced this? Is it likely that she will lose all ability to walk independently soon, or could the process be halted? (I know!! I'm expecting miracle cures from you all!! Sorry!) Really just need to know what others have experienced to give me some idea what I might expect.

    Thanks everyone.
    Nell
     
  2. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    My mum also broke her hip in December 2005. She seemed to recover from the operation well but unfortunately has been confined to a wheelchair ever since. She did regain some mobility in hospital but had very little physio and the physio stopped completely when she left hospital and moved to a nursing home.

    After much effort from me the physio restarted but it was sporadic and I think it was too late - she had 'forgotten' how to walk and/or had lost confidence in her own ability to do so.

    How old is your mum and how good/bad/indifferent was her mobility prior to her breaking her hip? Did she have physio after her op and is she still having it?

    The problem I have is that I hate the fact that my mum can't walk but I also realise that if she could walk she would be more likely to injure herself by falling and possibly suffering another fracture (she broke her collarbone about a year before she broke her hip).

    I doubt if I have been of much help as I have probably given you more questions than answers!
     
  3. JT13

    JT13 Registered User

    Aug 9, 2006
    41
    The Global Deterioration Scale for Assessment of Primary Degenerative Dementia

    Hi Nell,

    Question is, does she still feel pain from the old hip injury?

    Shuffling seems to be a normal part of progression of Dementia. I have been following the progression of Dementia over here using this as a general guideline. Maybe it will also be able to give you a clearer picture or form of reference for you.

    http://www.geriatric-resources.com/html/gds.html

    It lists out "The Global Deterioration Scale for Assessment of Primary Degenerative Dementia" based on a 7-Level Scale.

    Wishing you all the best and do take care.

    Regards,
    J
     
  4. Helena

    Helena Registered User

    May 24, 2006
    715
    I somehow think that does not truly apply when it comes to Vascular dementia

    my Mother on a bad day shows pretty much 90% of the symptoms in 1 to 6 and some of stage 7

    However on a good day she only exhibits 1 to 3

    Since she wont go near the doctors and since they refuse to arrange any tests even if i got her there we are at stalemate

    I have no idea what we are going to do and only wish I knew when the nightmare would end
     
  5. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Don't forget that there is no precise dementia box that defines pretty much anything decisive at all for individual patients.

    The doctors try to encapsulate the most common symptoms of the condition and then attempt to line them up with the development of the condition over time. they then try to say what might reasonably be expected to happen at given stages.

    It is not gospel!

    Since the various dementias can frequently be present in a single patient at the same time, this tends to confuse things even more. Is the vascular element 10%, 50%, 70%, 100% of the cause, and what would that mean, symptoms-wise anyhow?

    Looking at the Reisberg list, reproduced once again on the site that JT13 lists, I wonder if it is only most conclusive when - as with my Jan - the person reaches stage 7?

    These things are useful to use, but should only be considered as additional - possibly interesting - information.
     
  6. JT13

    JT13 Registered User

    Aug 9, 2006
    41
    Hello there Helena & Brucie :)

    As mentioned before, it is a general guideline that I use to monitor the progression of Dementia with the person I care for. Brucie has clearly reiterated that it is not a gospel. Of course it isn't. Dementia is different with each individual, type of dementia and many other factors. I however use it as a general gauge to understand and plan for other symptoms that may or may not occur when the Dementia gets to a more severe stage.

    Helena... as a general idea, this was what I did. I had been writing down everything in a journal (thanks to Brucie's suggestion in a previous thread). For example, out of 30 days, I summarize how many days she shows each symptom and average them out at the end of the month. From there, I gauge the severity of her Dementia month to month.

    Yesterday, she heard chickens clucking and asked if we've fed the little chickens. However, she doesn't hear the chickens very often. I do however monitor the frequency. From this gauge, I'm able to get an averaged idea of the severity of her Dementia... which falls between 6 to 7. This, helps me plan for her future.

    Hope I've managed to clarify a few things, and thanks guys.
     
  7. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    I can see parts of what is happening to my Mother in 6 I always look at those stages think and like now wish I had not, because it reminds me how long this AD can go on for and can get very depress about it , but I suppose its learning to live with it in a positive way of thinking that I find so hard .

    It may help some carer in writing it all down how the desies is progressing, but not for me and when they get to stage seven; well they can live like that for years. How can they call that living is it far for the person to live like that. well I suppose there people that think better to have life then no life at all as my daughter keep say when I bring that issue up so I don’t bring up that issue up anymore just wanted to share part of what I am feeling as that part is what is making me depress about it . sorry am just a person that can not live in the now take one day at a time as I know that’s what is going to happen to my mother If I can share it all with you with out offending anyone, it does help me carry on. Sorry to but in about this
    Nell
    when all you are asking is about your mother mobility my mother has not broken her hip, but her mobility is still going and has been shuffling for a long time Mum use to make so much nose is she does not have the right shoes clack clacking that the lady downstairs new when mum was getting up to the toilet and my would wake my daughter at night time so got mum soft slippers

    Mum walking is even getting slower and can not walk unaided and she knows it so try her best to keep walking so the musical in her legs do not get weak
     
  8. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia


    Mum was very mobile before breaking her hip. She did have physio for about 4 months after the break, until the physio herself discontinued it. Having read your post I think it might be a very good idea to have the physio back and to see her again. Thanks for the idea! Nell
     
  9. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia


    Thanks J. She doesn't seem to have any pain, altho' sometimes I see her wince a little so perhaps it hurts more than she llets on.

    Thanks for the scale - looking at it I'd say Mum is somewhere around no. 5 - maybe 4 on good days. Obviously we are stilll a way from the worst stages.
    Nell
     
  10. clare

    clare Registered User

    Oct 7, 2005
    31
    lost the will to walk

    Hi All

    Ive been reading this post with interest as mobility seems to be my mums present problem. Up to a few weeks ago she was very mobile, especially when violent, kicking etc. but now she just seems to have given up.
    I was shocked to see her in a wheel chair in the nh when we visited, but they say there is no physical reason why she cant walk just wont. Her medication has been reduced so i dont think this is the problem.
    Anyone had similar experience. I think mum is proberly about start of stage 7.

    thanks
    claire
     
  11. JT13

    JT13 Registered User

    Aug 9, 2006
    41
    Hi Nell,

    Hope that you are well. If your mum is wincing, then best you don't take that lightly. Dementia sufferers do not or are not fully capable of telling you about their pain.

    She's not going to be able to express it to the Physiologist either. Do take her to the Geriatrician as there are ways to test for pain.

    All the best to you and your mum.

    Regards,
    J
     

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