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Incontinence

Cholly

New member
May 9, 2019
3
My husband has diffused Lewy body disease . A combination of Parkinsons and dementia. Incontinence is now a big problem as he soils the incontinence pants continually throughout the day and night. He doesn’t seem to go to the toilet to open his bowels at all just passes poo continuously. This means changing pants and cleaning him up every few hours. It is getting very tough to deal with. I am hoping to get carers in in the mornings but this really isn’t a great help as it goes on constantly. Anyone else have this to deal with.
 

Weasell

Registered User
Oct 21, 2019
343
So the question here is, is the continual pooing a new behaviour ? Or is he someone who has done this for years but because they have been in control of their own continence you didn’t realise they did it?
Here is some ransom info.
If you are using pull ups the best way to remove them is to cut the sides with scissors.

It is easier to change a pad than pulls ups, but if someone is able to go to the toilet to urinate you disempower them by putting them in pads.

If you get a referral you can get free pads. It may be a good idea to talk to the continence nurse anyway. ( That is a specialist nurse not any nurse )

The best way to clean poo, is to use the clean area of the pad to wipe away as much as you can before you start with wet wipes.
 
Last edited:

Chrystle

Registered User
Feb 15, 2018
17
So the question here is, is the continual pooing a new behaviour ? Or is he someone who has done this for years but because they have been in control of their own continence you didn’t realise they did it?
Here is some ransom info.
If you are using pull ups the best way to remove them is to cut the sides with scissors.

It is easier to change a pad than pulls ups, but if someone is able to go to the toilet to urinate you disempower them by putting them in pads.

If you get a referral you can get free pads. It may be a good idea to talk to the continence nurse anyway. ( That is a specialist nurse not any nurse )

The best way to clean poo, is to use the clean area of the pad to wipe away as much as you can before you start with wet wipes.
 

Chrystle

Registered User
Feb 15, 2018
17
What brilliant practical info, thank you!
My PWD has just become doubly incontinent quite suddenly - hoping for a ‘recovery’ but managing expectations.
Totally unwanted aspect of marital intimacy - on the other hand, I’m amazed at what I’ve been able to handle without disgust or squeamishness. Recent experience of baby grandchildren has helped.
Hate it tho
God bless all you brave folk out there
 

Weasell

Registered User
Oct 21, 2019
343
What brilliant practical info, thank you!
My PWD has just become doubly incontinent quite suddenly - hoping for a ‘recovery’ but managing expectations.
Totally unwanted aspect of marital intimacy - on the other hand, I’m amazed at what I’ve been able to handle without disgust or squeamishness. Recent experience of baby grandchildren has helped.
Hate it tho
God bless all you brave folk out there
You just reminded me of the other point I meant to mention!
When start changing poo pads you think
Yuk
Yuk
Yuk
Then one day you change a pad and realise you did it on autopilot and didn’t even think about it!
 

Agzy

Registered User
Nov 16, 2016
1,380
Moreton, Wirral. UK.
So the question here is, is the continual pooing a new behaviour ? Or is he someone who has done this for years but because they have been in control of their own continence you didn’t realise they did it?
Here is some ransom info.
If you are using pull ups the best way to remove them is to cut the sides with scissors.

It is easier to change a pad than pulls ups, but if someone is able to go to the toilet to urinate you disempower them by putting them in pads.

If you get a referral you can get free pads. It may be a good idea to talk to the continence nurse anyway. ( That is a specialist nurse not any nurse )

The best way to clean poo, is to use the clean area of the pad to wipe away as much as you can before you start with wet wipes.
I had a telephone consultation with the continence nurse and she agreed to arrange a delivery of pads for Pauline and, 7 days later, 2 big boxes arrived full of pads and summary that said they estimate they should last until September. Pauline loves them but storage is a bit of a problem, see pic.
A5A34D63-D49C-4D0C-B6E0-5AC988B5DD65.jpeg
A5A34D63-D49C-4D0C-B6E0-5AC988B5DD65.jpeg
 

Jaz

New member
Jun 30, 2020
1
My husband has diffused Lewy body disease . A combination of Parkinsons and dementia. Incontinence is now a big problem as he soils the incontinence pants continually throughout the day and night. He doesn’t seem to go to the toilet to open his bowels at all just passes poo continuously. This means changing pants and cleaning him up every few hours. It is getting very tough to deal with. I am hoping to get carers in in the mornings but this really isn’t a great help as it goes on constantly. Anyone else have this to deal with.
I am a first time user of any forum so please bear with me if I make mistakes. I have the same problem with my mum. She’s 92 and was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and vascular dementia about 2 years ago. I think in her case, the vascular dementia has caused muscles to weaken and this includes the bowel. Like you I am constantly changing pants and cleaning her up and any additional accidents because it just seems as if her bowel is open constantly. I find it hard too and there are days when I feel like just giving up but other days, like one of the other members said, I go into automatic pilot mode and just get on with it. I have found ways to manage some aspects which you might find helpful:

I use scissors to cut the pants off. I then provide mum with toilet paper and wet wipes and explain how to use them - because she forgets. I leave the toilet door ajar so I know when she is thinking of getting off the toilet. I then ‘secretly’ watch whilst she cleans herself (to maintain some semblence of independence) and I’m able to pick up any accidents without her knowing. It also means I have less to clean up on her and I’m able to just give a helping hand - which she’s a lot happier about and finds less embarrassing. I give her caffeine free tea and coffee as, the incontinence nurse told me caffeine stimulates a muscle in the bladder making you want to go to the loo more often. This has helped. After every meal, snack I ask her if she wants to go to the loo as I’ve learned that every time she eats it acts as a stimulant. Sometimes I get it timed right and she actually goes to the loo on the toilet. Every time she’s amazed “because she didn’t know she wanted to go!” I take it as a win - 😂I’ve also cut down on foods that seem to go through her - such as chocolate, high fibre cereals etc. That helps in terms of consistency (ugh). Sorry that’s probably too much info.