housing association trying to evict my mum because she has dementia

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by robertsnicola, Jun 11, 2015.

  1. robertsnicola

    robertsnicola Registered User

    Jun 11, 2015
    2
    portsmouth
    #1 robertsnicola, Jun 11, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 12, 2015
    my mother has recently been diagnoised with dementia and the housing association where she lives is sending me threatening letters that they are going to end my mothers tenancy as she is a risk to others and the security of the building and distressing other tenants.
    yes my mum is forgetful and gets muddled at times but she does not cook for herself or cause any trouble, she is fully mobile takes care of herself and is well suported by family.
    but this housing association is demanding she has 24 hour care immediately which she doesnt need.
    i am a nurse and have tried to point this out to them but this pompous ceo ex army is sending me threatening letters i need help or someone to educate him on dementia and stop the distress he is causing me and mum.
    my mum has been through so much in the last 18mths she lost her husband of 53 yrs to cancer who i cared for till he passed away as well as mum , her home in spain, and her social network...... it makes me so cross that this housing association appears to have little if no understanding of dementia and that mum is still an individual who can live independently with support and deserves to me respected and feel valued as such despite her condition...........
    anyone got any advice id appreciate it as even though i have negotiated the mine field of social care and i have a lot of experience of dementia i find that ordinary peoples lack of understanding and knowledge of dementia very frustrating and feel mum is being marginalized and treated unfairly by this housing association.
     
  2. Suzanna1969

    Suzanna1969 Registered User

    Mar 28, 2015
    346
    Essex
    Woah! Local MP time I think! PDQ!
     
  3. Isabella41

    Isabella41 Registered User

    Feb 20, 2012
    901
    Northern Ireland
    Unless they can show specific examples of how your mother is posing a danger to others and a risk to the building they don't have a leg to stand on. If it were my mother I think i'd be writing to them via registered letter asking them to provide proof. If they can't give times and dates and specific examples of risky behavior then they don't have a case. I'd also threaten them with disabilty discrimination legislation.
     
  4. SugarRay

    SugarRay Registered User

    May 5, 2014
    48
    Sunny South East
    Now, I used to work for a housing association In a small team including nurses and social workers - but when I was there rent arrears were the easiest to get people evicted for - anti- social behaviour took a long time, there were acceptable behavioural contracts etc etc.

    I would speak to someone higher, unless they have proof and even with proof they can not throw her out.... I can see the headlines now HA makes VUNERABLE ADULT PERSON WITH DEMENTIA homeless. They have a DUTY OF CARE, throw in the Equality Act... I used to deal with drug addicts and mental health and they were 100 times worse than your mum.. trust me on that!

    Definitely speak to someone higher up in the first instance and DO NOT remove her. If her rent is up to date, good - if it isn't make sure it is pdq.

    I feel this Pompous person want them off "their patch" for an easier life. Well guess what - it ain't gonna happen! You are a nurse.... as hard as it is, because it is Mum, go into work mode. Think if this person was on my ward what would I have to do to keep them safe.

    I'm sorry if it's come across forceful or ranty - but reading your post has got my dander right up!

    Keep us posted. SR. X
     

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