1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. sleepingplum

    sleepingplum Registered User

    Mar 1, 2015
    46
    I wonder if anybody has any suggestions as to how I can secure our garden gate. we need to go shopping on Saturday afternoon and we need to secure our metal garden gate to stop my fil from going out onto the road the front garden is big enough to be away from the house if he wants fresh air or gets it into his head he wants to go see his friends (he doesn't know where they live) the house is all safe and he cant turn anything harmful on but we have got the worry that he might have a thought he doesn't do it all the time but we need to make sure.
     
  2. susy

    susy Registered User

    Jul 29, 2013
    806
    North East
    If it is a big gate then I would put a padlock on the top of it. Either at the front or the back, entirely for where you need it to be. Hide the key somewhere safe (take it with you?)
    If it's a low gate then the same unless he could climb over it. Some of our older folk are remarkably nimble!!!! X
     
  3. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,559
    Female
    Scotland
    When we moved into this house four years ago and before diagnosis my husband put a slip bolt top and bottom on our back gate and a padlock in the centre. I thought it was over the top as we live in a very nice quiet area but it has turned out to be a good thing as I can be quite certain he cannot wander when out there!
     
  4. DivingDavey

    DivingDavey Registered User

    Feb 18, 2015
    32
    Solihull
    Just a thought, you could fit a combination lock to the gate, that way there's a permanent solution in place. You can also get a little combiation "safe" that fits to a wall or fence that you can keep the key in, so you don't have to worry about relatives and friends not having a key as it's always there.
     
  5. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,829
    UK
    Ah the garden gate, I have had this problem for a long time now. Bought a combination padlock and a small chain. The combination is just set at 1111. It worked, mum has stopped wandering out, maybe its just the Dementia moving on, but now with it I can relax and know that mum is just pottering around the garden while I carry on in the house. I was initially worried that if I did this she would try to climb over the gate, thankfully she never did.
     
  6. sleepingplum

    sleepingplum Registered User

    Mar 1, 2015
    46
    I was thinking of this and am always worried if I leave to do shopping but I am never gone for long this time I will be gone for about 3 hours and was worried that if anything happened people wouldn't be able to get in. a combination lock would be good as sometimes I have to go to pick up my son from school and my father in law would let anybody in (cold callers) but sometimes its not possible to stay at home
     
  7. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,829
    UK
    It has worked for me, neighbours and friends know the combination and anyone important. Anyone else who knows the situation in my home can see my car in the driveway and usually give me a quick call on their mobiles. The one tiny problem I have had is occasionally someone forgets to reset it when entering or leaving, they get a quick lecture and telling off and don't usually make the same mistake twice!!!
     
  8. sleepingplum

    sleepingplum Registered User

    Mar 1, 2015
    46
    thank you I will have a word with my OH later anything has to be better than him walking across the street when there are cars up and down and forgetting where he is.
     

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