1. taylorcat

    taylorcat Registered User

    Jun 18, 2006
    171
    W.Scotland
    I think I've managed to talk my Dad into coming to stay with me and we can put an extension on for him to have his own space if he wants.

    What I want to know is would he qualify for a grant for this even though he owns his house.

    I'll phone on Monday and find out but I just wondered if anyone had experience of this?
     
  2. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Dear Taylorcat,

    Are you talking about putting an extension on YOUR house? And your father owns a totally different house?
     
  3. taylorcat

    taylorcat Registered User

    Jun 18, 2006
    171
    W.Scotland
    Yes, Jennifer.
     
  4. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Have you seen this http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2003/09/18303/27476

    Although it's directed more at making a property habitable, it also relates to making a house significantly more accessible for a disabled person. Now the question, I think, is whether your father could be classified as disabled. If he did, theoretically, if a grant was given it would come under the "minimum percentage grant"

    According to http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/47176/0028734.pdf
    councils must give a grant (within the limits of their budget whatever that means)
    "installing any additional standard amenities which are
    needed because a disabled occupant cannot use the
    existing ones"

    My personal feeling is that "within the limits of their budget" is a weasel phrase which will probably mean you'll be out of luck, but maybe you won't be.

    Best wishes
     
  5. taylorcat

    taylorcat Registered User

    Jun 18, 2006
    171
    W.Scotland
    Thanks for the helpful links.

    I'm just thinking. I would probably have to have an extension put on sometime in the future anyway since my son has special needs and there will come a time when he wants his independence and this would be ideal.

    I wonder if I should mention this when phoning or indeed state that the extension would be for his benefit, although with him only being 12 I don't know if that would work.
     
  6. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Actually that might work better - I vaguely remember reading a couple of years ago that they had changed the rules to allow parents to apply for this on their children's behalf. That may have been England though but I'll see if I can find the link.
     
  7. taylorcat

    taylorcat Registered User

    Jun 18, 2006
    171
    W.Scotland
    That would be great, Jennifer. Although I don't know if because he's only 12 just now they might think I'm mad. I could say I want piece of mind for the future, which I do really.
     
  8. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Have you ever dealt with builders? He could easily be 18 before they finish this proposed extension:D I haven't found the thing I was looking for I'm afraid.
     
  9. taylorcat

    taylorcat Registered User

    Jun 18, 2006
    171
    W.Scotland
    Good point. I must just go down that route or I might even just tell them the truth that it is for my Dad at the moment but would be for my son's use in future.

    I'll have a look about and see if I can find anything out.

    Thanks
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.