End of life care but pacemaker needs new battery

Discussion in 'End of life care' started by jp57jac, Nov 27, 2019.

  1. jp57jac

    jp57jac New member

    Nov 27, 2019
    5
    My mumis 74 and has had dementia for 7 years now. I was caring for her in her own home but last November she had a stoke and in January went from hospital into a care home for rehabilitation. Unfortunately she has really deteriorated. Mum is bed bound, doubly incontinent, can't speak, feed herself and doesn't recognize anyone anymore. Mum has to be turned every two hours and cannot move on her own, her legs have contracted up so we can't even hoist her in a wheelchair. We have been told she on palliative care but the doctors want to re new her battery on her pace maker. We have medical power of attorney and know without a doubt she would NOT wish this to be done. Has anyone else been in this situation? Any advice please, Thank you
     
  2. nellbelles

    nellbelles Volunteer Host

    Nov 6, 2008
    8,512
    leicester
    Hello @jp57jac welcome to DTP
    If you have POA talk to the medics sometimes they don’t want to raise the subject of no further treatment if all the family is in agreement then put your point of view.
    Now you have found the forum I hope you will continue to post for further support
     
  3. Duggies-girl

    Duggies-girl Registered User

    Sep 6, 2017
    1,757
    Hi @jp57jac Dad had his pacemaker battery tested recently and he has another 5 years left on it which is good.

    I believe that when the battery runs out then the whole unit has to be replaced and I really can't understand why any doctor would wish to subject your mum to this procedure at this stage of her illness. I agree with the previous response and that you need to speak to the doctors about it. Sometimes doctors just tick the boxes without taking a good look at the patient.

    Hope they see sense.
     
  4. Lawson58

    Lawson58 Registered User

    My husband has a defibrillator in place and he also has a good percentage of his battery available to him, probably 4-5 years provided he doesn't need his heart to be shocked.

    Given the condition of your mother, I am surprised that they want to do the replacement. If it were me, I think I would be having a serious conversation with the doctors. It is obvious from what you say that you think there is nothing to be achieved for your mother and you can't help but wonder why they are thinking like that. Where is the compassion in that?
     
  5. Dimpsy

    Dimpsy Registered User

    Sep 2, 2019
    895
    Female
    It looks as if there needs to be a two-way conversation between your family and the medics/care home.
    No-one knows better than you and your family your mum's belief's and wishes and you should be able to steer this ship to what your mum would say if she was able.
    You might consider that these days 74 is not a great age; it isn't the quantity of days that count but the quality of life for the time remaining.
    Above all else, your mum deserves dignity which only the people who love her can provide.
     
  6. jp57jac

    jp57jac New member

    Nov 27, 2019
    5
    Thank you for your reply, I have made an appointment to see the doctor so fingers crossed. x
     
  7. jp57jac

    jp57jac New member

    Nov 27, 2019
    5
    Thank you for your reply, I have made an appointment to see my mums doctor x
     
  8. jp57jac

    jp57jac New member

    Nov 27, 2019
    5
    Thank you for your reply, you are right 74 is a very young age. This is my mums worst nightmare, she made us promise never to put her in a home but at the end we didn't have a choice. My mum also had a mass that took 2 months to drain from her stomach so she needed nursing care. She is just a shell now with absolutely no response to anyone or anything. It's just so cruel :(
     
  9. jp57jac

    jp57jac New member

    Nov 27, 2019
    5
    Sorry to hear about your husband and thank you for your kind words, I totally agree.
     
  10. Curlew

    Curlew New member

    Dec 10, 2019
    4
    Hi, I've not personally been in your situation, but when I read your OP, I was strongly reminded of a Radio 4 programme I heard which dealt with the issues involved in an almost identical situation. I can't post the link as this is actually my first forum post, but if you go to BBC Sounds and search for "Inside the Ethics Committee", Series 10, Treating Patients with Dementia, you should find it.
     

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