Emi

RussellC

Registered User
Jul 6, 2006
47
My father is currently being assessed in hospital. After three weeks there are strong indications given that he needs EMI care. He is being assessed for a further three weeks and various drugs are being tried to stabilise his condition.

Is it possible that the drugs would mean (a) he may not need EMI care but could be cared for at home (b) that he could be cared for in a Nursing Home?

My reason for asking is that we may wish to keep him at home if possible and seem to be very few EMI beds in our area.

Thanks

Russell
 

Amy

Registered User
Jan 4, 2006
3,453
Hiya Kath,
I think it is Elderly Mentally Infirm - I think they tend to be smaller, more secure units.
Russell, see how the medication goes. Ask questions of the doctors, what care they feel your father needs. If he were to return home what care can be put in place for him there?
Love Helen
 

RussellC

Registered User
Jul 6, 2006
47
Thanks for your replies.

My Dad seems OK with the drugs at this early stage. Mum and I go every day and talk to the nurse.

I will be leaving work for a trial month in the first week of September to support both my father and mother. I will be asking advice of the health team of what care standards are required.

Regards

Russell
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
Liverpool
RussellC said:
Is it possible that the drugs would mean (a) he may not need EMI care but could be cared for at home (b) that he could be cared for in a Nursing Home?

My reason for asking is that we may wish to keep him at home if possible and seem to be very few EMI beds in our area.
Thanks

Russell
Do you mean a nursing home or a care home as there is a difference. Nursing homes tend to be for those of higher dependency eg the residents are less likely to be mobile - most of the residents in my mum's nursing home are in wheelchairs. My mum was in an EMI home until she broke her hip and EMI homes unless they are EMI NURSING homes can't generally look after someone in a wheelchair.
 

Kriss

Registered User
May 20, 2004
513
Shropshire
My heart nearly fell to my boots when we were told Aunt needed EMI care. She seemed happy in her residential home but we were not witnessing the daily horrors during our visits. Dad only went into a specialist EMI unit at the very end - initially for respite.

However, when the time comes - if it comes - I know there are others as well as me who can vouch they are not all "homes from hell" as I initially feared. Aunts home is purpose built, light and airy. It has a nursing unit on the floor above so should residents health deteriorate they can be cared for without moving on again. There are also 2 levels of emi care, the one for relatively early stage residents and the other for those needing help with almost all their daily needs.

I hope you will find the drugs will allow time for you to research and perhaps go on a waiting list for the home which can offer the best for your Father. The situation is very stressful and to be further stressed with the urgency of the move as well takes even the most calm of us to the edge.

Good luck
 

RussellC

Registered User
Jul 6, 2006
47
Kriss

Thanks very much for this.

I had these fears about EMI care and you have set my mind at rest.

My Dad had a review by his doctor yesterday. I had sent a letter for the panel to let them know I would be leaving work to look after my Dad if he were considered suitable for release at the end of the assessment period (in two and a half weeks). I also outlined what I saw as the care we could provide at home.

Last night I was told by the Nurse that the doctor had read my letter and Dad had been put on an Alzheimer's drug. There was a noticeable improvement in his awareness, reading etc, so we are hoping that there will be no side effects to prevent his taking it. I would guess it is Ebixa as he couldn't take Aricept. Up to now they seem to have tried anti agitation drugs and stabilising drugs.

I hope the improvement will be sufficient for him to be released. The plan would then be, following your line, to research the most suitable home for him for the future.

TP has bee a lifeline. Thanks to you and everyone else for listening and helping.

Russell
 

Kriss

Registered User
May 20, 2004
513
Shropshire
Russell - TP has been a lifeline to all of us, there are some pretty amazing people around here, it never fails to inspire me reading through the posts. We laugh and we cry, all enduring various levels of the hell that is AD. Our strength is that we do it together.

Bless you all

Kriss
 

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
113,517
Messages
1,661,684
Members
64,575
Latest member
WindmillMan