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Early stages - Driving

UncleZen

Registered User
Dec 24, 2019
10
My wife has the early stages of Alzheimers.
I was told to inform the DVLA, and the specialist filled out a simple form for me to send them. He didn't say she couldn't or shouldn't drive. only to inform DVLA
I filled out a CG1 form and sent it to DVLA as well as the simple form mentioned above.
I assume she can drive, until told otherwise.
IMO she is safe to drive at this stage, she never goes far anyway.
Was I right to do this? With hindsight, I should have asked here first, but it didn't occur to me until afterwards.
Thanks
 

Vic10

Registered User
Feb 18, 2017
101
You also need to inform her insurers.
When I did this for my OH there was no problem or increase in cost but they should be made aware.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
11,648
South coast
A diagnosis is not an automatic from driving, but you do need to tell the DVLA and the insurance company. I see that Louise has already posted a link
 

jaymor

Volunteer Moderator
Jul 14, 2006
12,796
England
We advised DVLA and insurance company at the point my husband was diagnosed. They took away his licence and replaced it with an annual one. He was tested every twelve months and he continued to drive for 4 years post diagnosis. I’m sure we have members who have continued to drive for longer.
 

UncleZen

Registered User
Dec 24, 2019
10
I plan to tell the car insurance
I declared it on the holiday insurance as well, that went up quite a bit.
 

UncleZen

Registered User
Dec 24, 2019
10
A bit of good news. Phoned the car insurance company, Saga, and they didnt want to know. They only want to know if the licence is revoked. This, they said was their policy, as they only insure over 55s, and wouldn't necessarily be the policy of other insurance companies.
 

Wakky

Registered User
Jan 5, 2020
44
My wife has the early stages of Alzheimers.
I was told to inform the DVLA, and the specialist filled out a simple form for me to send them. He didn't say she couldn't or shouldn't drive. only to inform DVLA
I filled out a CG1 form and sent it to DVLA as well as the simple form mentioned above.
I assume she can drive, until told otherwise.
IMO she is safe to drive at this stage, she never goes far anyway.
Was I right to do this? With hindsight, I should have asked here first, but it didn't occur to me until afterwards.
Thanks
Hello there. My husband was diagnosed with early stages of AD in September 2019. There were no concerns about his driving. We in formed the DVLA and (as I think is usual) he was issued with a new driving licence which is renewed yearly. We informed his insurers who thanked us, but said it didn't incur any increased charges. This is good as my husband would be devastated if he was no longer allowed to drive.
 

Thethirdmrsc

Registered User
Apr 4, 2018
127
One thing to be wary of is when the PWD no longer has their license. When my husbands was not renewed last year, I informed our insurance, **** and had his name removed. **** then upped my payments by £3 a month, as they said a lone driver was more at risk. I felt like I had been doubly penalised.
 

Wakky

Registered User
Jan 5, 2020
44
One thing to be wary of is when the PWD no longer has their license. When my husbands was not renewed last year, I informed our insurance, ****, and had his name removed.****then upped my payments by £3 a month, as they said a lone driver was more at risk. I felt like I had been doubly penalised.
I would never, ever recommend **** as insurers for ANYTHING!!! WE had home insurance with them and ended up in quite a battle of wills over mis-selling of boiler insurance ( when they knew full well they would NEVER pay out for repairs!!) I persisted with my complaint and eventually got a payment which would have been given if we had got a new one, which we used towards the repair, and also a refund of the premium paid for the boiler cover. We were left without warmth or hot water during the coldest days of the year. My advice would be to "shop around" when your car insurance is due for renewal. By the way, boiler is still working fine after we had it repaired by the company that **** would have used!!
 

Countryboy

Registered User
Mar 17, 2005
1,449
Cornwall
We advised DVLA and insurance company at the point my husband was diagnosed. They took away his licence and replaced it with an annual one. He was tested every twelve months and he continued to drive for 4 years post diagnosis. I’m sure we have members who have continued to drive for longer.
Yep up to now it's been 21 years since I was first diagnosed and like your husband was issued with a yearly driving licence but after many battles I got my Full driving licence back ok it took 12 years but still driving today
 

PalSal

Registered User
Dec 4, 2011
804
Pratteln Switzerland
Yep up to now it's been 21 years since I was first diagnosed and like your husband was issued with a yearly driving licence but after many battles I got my Full driving licence back ok it took 12 years but still driving today
Still driving?? after 21 years....I guess you can also still use a computer. A slow progression if Alzheimers, perhaps another dementia diagnosised.
@ZenUncle Certainly the experience of most carers , it that the people we care for have NO SELF Awareness. It is one of the symptoms of Alzheimers. My husband insisted he drove perfectly, and could do everything but all of us could see that his reaction time was very limited and his understanding was impaired....until he hit a bicyclist while driving with my son. Luckily, she was not hurt badly, and she did not discover he had Alzheimers. Yet he would still not stop driving, even after they revoked his license. And in the end to prevent him from driving I had to sell both of the cars. That was seven years ago. So, he drove approximately 10 years after diagnosis of Early On Set Alzheimers. He could no longer use the computer or the TV remote control, or the mobile phone.....but he could drive a car. It was a sad day for him to lose his license, but he was unable to see that he was a danger to himself and others. You will know when it is no longer appropriate for her to drive.
That is our experience.
 

Countryboy

Registered User
Mar 17, 2005
1,449
Cornwall
Still driving?? after 21 years....I guess you can also still use a computer. A slow progression if Alzheimers, perhaps another dementia diagnosised.
@ZenUncle Certainly the experience of most carers , it that the people we care for have NO SELF Awareness. It is one of the symptoms of Alzheimers. My husband insisted he drove perfectly, and could do everything but all of us could see that his reaction time was very limited and his understanding was impaired....until he hit a bicyclist while driving with my son. Luckily, she was not hurt badly, and she did not discover he had Alzheimers. Yet he would still not stop driving, even after they revoked his license. And in the end to prevent him from driving I had to sell both of the cars. That was seven years ago. So, he drove approximately 10 years after diagnosis of Early On Set Alzheimers. He could no longer use the computer or the TV remote control, or the mobile phone.....but he could drive a car. It was a sad day for him to lose his license, but he was unable to see that he was a danger to himself and others. You will know when it is no longer appropriate for her to drive.
That is our experience.
Well it was first suggested by my GP to see a Consultant Psychists in July 1999 after various tests was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in Novembers 1999 aged 56½. and asked to take a trial drug Aricept I continued working not accepting the diagnoses in March 2003 was sent for a PET brain scan and April 2004 a SPECT brain scan which showed loss of volume on the Frontal -temporal -lobes dignosed FTD I never gave up work had years of battles with DVLA and “Yes” I still use a computer since in 1986 and I still Drive with no real issues ok health not brilliant with Diabetes, Angina, Kidney Cancer, high blood pressure, Cholesterol, B12 Injections , I’m a prime target for this Coronavirus :eek::eek: but if my time is up its up remember where here today and gone today Tomorrow never comes:):)
 

PalSal

Registered User
Dec 4, 2011
804
Pratteln Switzerland
Well it was first suggested by my GP to see a Consultant Psychists in July 1999 after various tests was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in Novembers 1999 aged 56½. and asked to take a trial drug Aricept I continued working not accepting the diagnoses in March 2003 was sent for a PET brain scan and April 2004 a SPECT brain scan which showed loss of volume on the Frontal -temporal -lobes dignosed FTD I never gave up work had years of battles with DVLA and “Yes” I still use a computer since in 1986 and I still Drive with no real issues ok health not brilliant with Diabetes, Angina, Kidney Cancer, high blood pressure, Cholesterol, B12 Injections , I’m a prime target for this Coronavirus :eek::eek: but if my time is up its up remember where here today and gone today Tomorrow never comes:):)
Amazing good for you Countryboy....wishing you all the best.