1. Saffie

    Saffie Registered User

    Mar 26, 2011
    22,493
    Female
    Near Southampton
    #21 Saffie, Oct 27, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2015
    My solicitor didn't charge for handing over my husband's Will.
    I also has to have forms from the bank, BS and my husband's Isa provider signed by a solicitor to say that I was not going to probate. I was charged just £10 for this and a lot of other helpful information too.
     
  2. lin1

    lin1 Registered User

    Jan 14, 2010
    9,320
    Female
    East Kent
    #22 lin1, Oct 27, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2015
    Hi. When applying for probate I had to hand in the original will which was held by a solicitor, they made no charge. the problem I had was, that the will had been made quite a few years before and the solicitor took a couple of letters and several weeks to find it.
    Their is an old thread on here about what to do after a death , I'll see if I can find it.

    http://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/showthread.php?12028-What-to-do-after-death

    this one is from the government site
    https://www.gov.uk/after-a-death/overview
     
  3. theunknown

    theunknown Registered User

    Apr 17, 2015
    325
    The information I've read on-line states that advertising in the London Gazette is in case the deceased has outstanding debts or there may be unexpected claims. If the person's financial situation is well-known I wouldn't bother doing it. In my mum's case, I know she has no debt, and the only people who have any claim on her estate are me and my sister. If you don't need to do it then why give yourself yet another thing to do? You do need to report the value of the estate to the tax office.

    The same guide also states that you don't need probate if a 'child' is executor for a 'mentally-incapacitated' parent. Presumably this is because the person who has PoA or deputyship already has access to all the information required. Although I'm sure there'll still be organisations that insist they need it :mad:.

    This all sounds so clinical doesn't it :(? You're talking about things that most people avoid talking about, but you find out you can't afford to that when dementia's involved.
     
  4. Pickles53

    Pickles53 Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    2,475
    Radcliffe on Trent
    I did use a solicitor for mum's estate. Sister and I were joint executors and the only other beneficiaries were (almost invisible)brother and (brilliant) former sister-in-law. Partly this was because I knew I would be doing most of the work otherwise, I will admit.:eek:

    Mum's estate was not too complicated, and there was a house to sell, so I used the same solicitors for the conveyancing. The cost was nowhere near £6k, about £1200 for the probate etc. That worked out as £300 per beneficiary which I reckoned was a bargain.

    If you do go down the solicitor route, get all the information they need together in a logical order. Saving them time will save you money. Mine said they are quite often presented with cardboard boxes full of every piece of paper found and expected to sort out what is important and what isn't. They can do it of course, but it can take ages.
     
  5. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,776
    Salford
    Same as Pickles, I paid £1,200 about 2 years ago for a fairly straightforward will, there were some complications as odd bank accounts and insurance policies kept popping up that was with a local High Street solicitor, I've since found out that a lot of accountants offer the service for a lot less money.
    K
     
  6. Slugsta

    Slugsta Registered User

    My MIL died in May this year and hubby was executor, ably assisted by me :) We didn't use a solicitor and it really wasn't too difficult. We told the estate agent that we wanted the house valued for probate, they didn't charge. In view of this, we used that firm when we came to sell the property (we complete tomorrow).

    Hubby is one of 7 so he has documented everything clearly and kept all communication to emails (which he has kept). We didn't do the notice in the London Gazette as hubby was convinced that MIL's affairs were very straightforward and he was adamant that no creditor was going to turn up later (time will tell!).
     
  7. Raggedrobin

    Raggedrobin Registered User

    Jan 20, 2014
    1,427
    Thanks all, for further comments. Encouraging that it doesn't cost as much as I had read at the solicitor but I shall continue to try to simplify Mum's affairs as much as possible so there is less to do when the time comes, whether or not I use a solicitor.

    I have an invisible sister, so I shall have to see what she wants us to do, too.
     
  8. Pickles53

    Pickles53 Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    2,475
    Radcliffe on Trent
    Totally agree that the more you can simplify now, the better.
     
  9. nicoise

    nicoise Registered User

    Jun 29, 2010
    1,806
    My invisible sister was very helpful in changing the locks and removing valuables for safekeeping the day Mum went into care, despite being too busy for the more mundane tasks previously. And in removing further items from the house after mum died.

    Also helped out by proof reading my IHT400 completion as co-executor...

    Yours may equally prove helpful in the monetary aspects of care - so keep records!
     
  10. Raggedrobin

    Raggedrobin Registered User

    Jan 20, 2014
    1,427
    good point and indeed I partly keep records for just that reason. My invisible is coming up to discuss finances with me but won't bother to go and see Mum while she is up here. Don't get me started...:mad:
     
  11. fredsnail

    fredsnail Registered User

    Dec 21, 2008
    649
    I did most of Grandad's probate myself and would have completed it but the invisible started kicking off about how long it was taking (only 3 months at that point!!) and sent a solicitors letter - so I handed it to a solicitor to complete as I didn't need the stress and agro because my Mum was poorly.
     
  12. Raggedrobin

    Raggedrobin Registered User

    Jan 20, 2014
    1,427
    I can understand that, one thing I am concerned about is that my invisible won't understand how long probate takes, whoever does it.
     

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