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Dilemma........to pay rent or not?

Pete R

Registered User
Jul 26, 2014
2,038
Staffs
A family member has moved into the home of a relative for the sole reason that the person cannot manage alone anymore. The carer manages to fit in 2 days a week work and there are no benefits paid to either. The care begins as just all housework, maintenance, shopping, cooking, gardening, driving and companionship. However this progresses to include personal care as well.

Should the family member pay a rent?

All opinions appreciated.
:)
 
Last edited:

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
So this person is basically receiving room and board for providing care 24/7 for most of the week? Depending on how much they are actually doing, I personally think they should be paid as well. It definitely doesn't sound as if they should pay rent.
 

Pete R

Registered User
Jul 26, 2014
2,038
Staffs
So this person is basically receiving room and board for providing care 24/7 for most of the week? Depending on how much they are actually doing, I personally think they should be paid as well. It definitely doesn't sound as if they should pay rent.
Thanks

The only time they are not "caring" is for 16 hours a week whilst at work.

PS. Do you have the power to fix the thread title????? Pretty please.:eek:
 

PeggySmith

Registered User
Apr 16, 2012
1,683
BANES
The family member has moved in to provide practical support for their relative. If said relative had to pay for all those services, it would cost quite a lot. If you think anyone's going to make a fuss about them living rent free, then set a realistic rent and also charge for all the cooking, cleaning etc. that they do. Your LA charges an hourly rate and while I'm not up to speed on that, it's not cheap.

Alternatively, if help wasn't being provided by the family member, your relative might have to move into a nursing or care home at enormous cost.

So, no I don't think they should be paying rent, really. Doubtless someone will be along in a minute to disagree....
 

ITBookworm

Registered User
Oct 26, 2011
456
Glasgow
As a "paper exercise" it might be useful to work out the following:
- what a reasonable rent figure might be to include board, food, utilities etc.
- what a reasonable salary figure for the carer might be, including being on call 24/7, all the housework etc. etc. (maybe find out what a non family live in carer would cost?)

The carer is then paid the difference between the two?

If anyone complains in future you can then show the figures and prove you have at least considered the situation and there is no financial abuse or favours :)
 

Beate

Registered User
May 21, 2014
11,950
London
Why isn't the cared for getting Attendance Allowance? It could be used to make up for shortfall in rent though if he lives in his own house or has no problem in paying the rent himself, there wouldn't really be any. I know this isn't the question asked but someone only working 16 hours a week might qualify for some benefits or working tax credits or what have you.

I live with my OH and we share the rent but that's because we've always done that and it would feel wrong to make him pay the lot (not sure what SS would say either), but then I haven't moved in with him for the sole purpose of caring for him.

Is there anyone who could at any point moan about lost rent? Is he self-funding?
 

mrs mcgonnagal

Registered User
May 9, 2015
153
As a "paper exercise" it might be useful to work out the following:
- what a reasonable rent figure might be to include board, food, utilities etc.
- what a reasonable salary figure for the carer might be, including being on call 24/7, all the housework etc. etc. (maybe find out what a non family live in carer would cost?)

The carer is then paid the difference between the two?

If anyone complains in future you can then show the figures and prove you have at least considered the situation and there is no financial abuse or favours :)
Yes, quite. If only the government would use that to work out carers allowance. The person has given up a lot to do this. Don't worry its justified if the person can afford it
 

Pete R

Registered User
Jul 26, 2014
2,038
Staffs
Alternatively, if help wasn't being provided by the family member, your relative might have to move into a nursing or care home at enormous cost.
Thanks for the reply and CH was avoided for perhaps 4-5 years but other help would still have been needed whilst still at home.
 

Pickles53

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
2,474
Radcliffe on Trent
If you're dong the calculations consider the impact on council tax. If the cared for person was living alone, they would have had 25% discount as a single occupant. Now they won't but if AA is awarded, then the SMI discount would reduce council tax again.
 

Raggedrobin

Registered User
Jan 20, 2014
1,427
I absolutely think the carer should have free board. I should think it would cause a lot of bad feeling if they were asked for rent. A huge amount is saved by having a live in carer. I looked into it for my Mum, it is a massive expense if someone had to pay for it.

The fact that the person works elsewhere 2 days a week is irrelevant, they are still there for most of the time. Actually if I was them I would expect free food as well, as in board and lodging, this might be preferable to financial payment.
 

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