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Dad has had his licence rescinded - he's furious!

attakgirl

New member
Sep 20, 2018
2
0
Hello everyone,

My dad was diagnosed with mild Alzhiemer's last Monday. It came as quite a surprise to him but not the rest of us. His consultant was very concerned about his lack of insight, especially around his deteriorating driving standards and the DVLA have rescinded his licence. This has been a huge blow for a man who has been a keen motorist all his life who enjoys regular jaunts in his sporty Jaguar (he's 88)!

Now he's disputing the diagnosis and talking of getting his solicitors involved (pointlessly of course), adamant he has no driving issues (he has). He's always been a very pragmatic, unemotional and strong willed man and gentle but fact-facing reasoning is falling on deaf ears.

Has anyone else been through this? I'm hoping he will accept things in time. Many thanks all.
Going through exactly the same situation with my husband. He had his licence revoked at the end of May and simply cannot understand why, after driving all over the world all his life, he is no longer “allowed” to drive. He obsesses constantly about getting another licence and has now started talking about buying himself another car so that he doesn’t have to use ours, which I have kept because I need it to get around too. I have come close to getting rid of it a couple of times in desperation, just to stop him going on about it and I have to hide the car key now or he will try to go for a drive. He simply cannot or will not understand that he is not safe to drive and would endanger other road users
 

AliceA

Registered User
May 27, 2016
2,914
0
So at the second visit to the psychiatrist on Tuesday, dad fishes out of his pocket "the letter from the DVLA" that he's been so indignant about, for us all to discover it's actually a copy of his assessment letter to his GP, recommending he stop driving! After a long and arduous discussion, he pipes up to the consultant (who thankfully I happen to know quite well) "Nothing personal but this is all a load of b***ocks, there's nothing wrong with my brain and nothing wrong with my driving. I'm going to carry on as I am." He refused to take a driving test, see his GP or be referred for a second opinion.
Meanwhile, his wife is blaming me for the havoc that's befallen them because of his diagnosis - which she also refuses to accept - and took to her bed before deciding she is going off to stay with her brother.
GP case conference next week.
Glass of wine anyone????? :)
Make it two!
 

Anotherz

Registered User
Sep 25, 2018
16
0
So at the second visit to the psychiatrist on Tuesday, dad fishes out of his pocket "the letter from the DVLA" that he's been so indignant about, for us all to discover it's actually a copy of his assessment letter to his GP, recommending he stop driving! After a long and arduous discussion, he pipes up to the consultant (who thankfully I happen to know quite well) "Nothing personal but this is all a load of b***ocks, there's nothing wrong with my brain and nothing wrong with my driving. I'm going to carry on as I am." He refused to take a driving test, see his GP or be referred for a second opinion.
Meanwhile, his wife is blaming me for the havoc that's befallen them because of his diagnosis - which she also refuses to accept - and took to her bed before deciding she is going off to stay with her brother.
GP case conference next week.
Glass of wine anyone????? :)

OH! I'm editing it, hang on....

So. Yes, my dad's licence was revoked, due to his poor peripheral vision. There was much grumbling. I can see why!

Anyway, he had to accept it. There is nothing that can be done if his licence is revoked due to medical advice. Yes, he *might* get a second opinion - it could actually be useful to him to confirm the first result. His wife needs to be supportive, it's a big problem for him, but he will be very grumpy.

The DVLA will send him a letter and ask for his licence to be returned. He MUST take notice of that. He could appeal, there are possibilities of that, again "but". If he keeps driving there will be consequences. A friendly visit from the police might help if it's tee'd up. An unfriendly one will unfortunately result if he keeps going.

So anyway, it's almost certainly gone. What next?

Well, it's possible - but one must be careful to say that - that an electric mobility scooter might be an option, but even IF it's possible, it might not be a possiblilty for long. My dad wanted an electric tricycle too. That wasn't a good idea. I've still got the thing. Able body & mind only.

In some areas there are bespoke bus services (ask the council, if they don't, they may know of). You call up, arrange a time within bounds, they come to the door to pick you up and drop you off, and return you. He might not be so lucky though.

That really leaves ordinary buses or taxis. Costing these out might be a good thing. There might actually be a cost benefit which could be a useful lever.
 
Last edited:

maryjoan

Registered User
Mar 25, 2017
1,633
0
South of the Border
Hello everyone,

My dad was diagnosed with mild Alzhiemer's last Monday. It came as quite a surprise to him but not the rest of us. His consultant was very concerned about his lack of insight, especially around his deteriorating driving standards and the DVLA have rescinded his licence. This has been a huge blow for a man who has been a keen motorist all his life who enjoys regular jaunts in his sporty Jaguar (he's 88)!

Now he's disputing the diagnosis and talking of getting his solicitors involved (pointlessly of course), adamant he has no driving issues (he has). He's always been a very pragmatic, unemotional and strong willed man and gentle but fact-facing reasoning is falling on deaf ears.

Has anyone else been through this? I'm hoping he will accept things in time. Many thanks all.

My OH was an advanced driver - and lost his license last year. We now have no car and no transport from our remote village - I have sight problems so gave up driving a few years ago.

My OH keeps thinking he will get his license back, also thinks it has been taken away because he has now got a stoma ( had a colonoscopy). He also tells people that he will have his operation reversed privately when he comes up on the lottery. The op cannot be reversed.

All nonsense of course, and just another part of this vile and horrid disease that our loved ones have.
 

AliceA

Registered User
May 27, 2016
2,914
0
My OH was an advanced driver - and lost his license last year. We now have no car and no transport from our remote village - I have sight problems so gave up driving a few years ago.

My OH keeps thinking he will get his license back, also thinks it has been taken away because he has now got a stoma ( had a colonoscopy). He also tells people that he will have his operation reversed privately when he comes up on the lottery. The op cannot be reversed.

All nonsense of course, and just another part of this vile and horrid disease that our loved ones have.
So difficult without transport, it makes like so complicated.
 

Mrs Tizzler

New member
Sep 24, 2018
8
0
So what's the answer to all those in rural spots with little or no access to public transport? Years ago when I was looking after my mum, I remember there used to be minibus schemes for the elderly or volunteer private drivers for a much smaller fee than local taxis. Are these things in short supply?

I've lived in a very rural part of France for the past 3 years, over there public transport in remote areas is non-existent. It's just customary for people to help their older neighbours with lifts and shopping if family aren't close by and small communes look out for each other. It's simple and it works.

Enjoying glass number 2 of a rather pleasant Chilean Merlot from the Coop (you did make me laugh Canary and AliceA). :D Cheers!
 

john51

Registered User
Apr 26, 2014
292
0
Dunstable, Bedfordshire
I was upset and relieved when DVLA took away my iicence. I wanted the independence of having it but knew it wasn't safe. it. it was towards the time when I was also retiring (and struggling) from work. I drove to work, arrived frazzled and did a poor days work. I reversed (I'm told fairly confidently) into the school minibus and Principals car.
What really upset me and made me angry was the attitude of the IAM when I wrote to them to tell them I had given up my license. It was very much OK thanks for letting us know you can stay a member until the next renewal then...bye. No thanks for the many Advanced Drivers I has supported as an observer over 10 years. Just bye bye (not even thanks for all the fish!)
 

AlisonE

Registered User
Mar 5, 2017
9
0
Hello everyone,

My dad was diagnosed with mild Alzhiemer's last Monday. It came as quite a surprise to him but not the rest of us. His consultant was very concerned about his lack of insight, especially around his deteriorating driving standards and the DVLA have rescinded his licence. This has been a huge blow for a man who has been a keen motorist all his life who enjoys regular jaunts in his sporty Jaguar (he's 88)!

Now he's disputing the diagnosis and talking of getting his solicitors involved (pointlessly of course), adamant he has no driving issues (he has). He's always been a very pragmatic, unemotional and strong willed man and gentle but fact-facing reasoning is falling on deaf ears.

Has anyone else been through this? I'm hoping he will accept things in time. Many thanks all.

hello there
I went through this with both my parents and actually had to 'dob them in' to the DVLA as I was so concerned about their driving and lack of insight. Dad (vascular dementia) was stopped anyway due to stroke, before the on road test happened (Mum was colluding with him to ensure he passed!!) but he was really angry so I do sympathise. (we just kept his keys, sold his car and he soon forgot it even existed; if he asked, we fudged an answer...) the year after Dad's death Mum's driving became poorer and I had to report her too. (we are now on the way to a dementia diagnosis with her too) I felt awful but I would feel even more awful if she had run someone over. I am a GP and have to deal with this with patients as well, I ask them (in front of family) if their offspring allow them to drive their grandchildren around as that is often a clue. I tell patients that insurance would not cover them if there were an accident. I support the family, as I know their view of their loved one's driving is much better than mine! Sitting in a surgery I cannot reliably assess someone's driving and I don't think any GP can or should (or should be expected to). Sometimes it is blatantly obvious, but sometimes not, and I feel DVLA should be advised if any doubt at all, and on road assessment can be arranged by the patient too. Recently a chap I was not sure about paid for his own on road assessment and passed - I was happy to feel he had been properly assessed. I lived in NZ for many years, everyone over 75 has an on road test ever 5y and I wish that happened here! GOOD LUCK! Keep a thick skin - easier said than done!!!