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D.n.r

spree

Registered User
Jun 25, 2014
33
north wales
j have been asked by Nursing home to signe a D.N.R on my husband although he is quite well at moment , is this usual for nursing homes to do this , I would welcome some advice please.
 

Pete R

Registered User
Jul 26, 2014
2,038
Staffs
j have been asked by Nursing home to signe a D.N.R on my husband although he is quite well at moment , is this usual for nursing homes to do this , I would welcome some advice please.
It is quite normal for a NH to ask what your/your husbands wishes are in the even of him needing resuscitation. It is always best for the staff to know beforehand.

:)
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
9,041
Yorkshire
Hi spree
when dad went into his care home last year this was one of the questions the manager asked - and I was glad, actually, that I could consider it at a time dad was fine so I wasn't under pressure during a crisis.
I did sign as I don't want dad to be brought round but then find his condition was much worse - and fortunately I'd had conversations with him over the years and I know his wishes for certain - he told me he's had a good life, been very happy, and if it's his time to let him go. It's very comforting to me to know this.
So, yes, I think it's a usual practice, nothing sinister.
 

marmarlade

Registered User
Jan 26, 2015
183
D n r

The home my hubby is in also does DNR but it seems to be at this home if the patience is able to get about [walking wheelchair] they just put on their record book NO DNR in place hubby hasnt got one in place,but i suppose with doing it this way if things go down hill they ask you do you want it, im not sure which is the best way as things with dementia change so quickly,
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
16,421
66
Toronto, Canada
when dad went into his care home last year this was one of the questions the manager asked - and I was glad, actually, that I could consider it at a time dad was fine so I wasn't under pressure during a crisis.....So, yes, I think it's a usual practice, nothing sinister.
I agree, it's much better to be able to think about this when there isn't any pressure.
 

fizzie

Registered User
Jul 20, 2011
2,730
Yes it is common and it is one of the things that CQC look at when they inspect. The thinking behind it is that it means that the home are talking to the family (and or the person) in some detail and really communicating and finding out their wishes (not just DNR but other things as well ). Also the care home are really the first line - so when they need to call the paramedics out for a fall or a chest infection they need to know what someone would want to happen in the event their heart stopped. It also makes the conversation about end of life care very much easier if and when it is necessary.

I think some people get worried because they think the end is nigh but that isn't true at all - it is much more about ensuring that someone's wishes are being carried out
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
20,054
North Manchester
"...thing is do they still treat a patient or just let them die??"

DNR only comes into play when the patient is effectively dead, not breathing and heart stopped. The R stands for resuscitate ie bring back to life.

An advanced care plan may have other implications.
 

LadyA

Registered User
Oct 19, 2009
13,563
Ireland
Do not resuscitate- means that if the person, for example has gone into cardiac or respiratory arrest- if their heart has stopped or they have stopped breathing independently - the doctors will not intervene at that point and "bring them back".
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
9,041
Yorkshire
spree, don't worry, it's not a licence to stop caring for your husband - of course any illnesses will be appropriately treated eg antibiotics given for a UTI
no-one will 'just let him die' - when his time comes all steps will be taken to make sure he is comfortable and pain free (palliative care)
as nitram and LadyA say, it just means that should your husband's heart stop naturally no CPR will be given