Comments Please Seroquel - Anti hallucination drug

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by cris, Oct 16, 2007.

  1. EmJ

    EmJ Registered User

    Sep 26, 2007
    230
    Scotland
    My Granny was prescribed seroquel by an old age psychiatrist when she had a bad UTI.

    After reading the medical instructions we sought advice from the Alzheimer's Society. We were made aware of the side effects and advised to go back to the doctor and ask for an alternative.

    We did not give her the medication and her mood improved when the UTI cleared up with antibiotics.

    EmJ :)
     
  2. cris

    cris Registered User

    Aug 23, 2006
    326
    Chelmsford
    Nebiroth. I never said that they must never be given. I started the thread because I was concerned for Susan and the effect the drug was having on her. Very often it takes several attempts to find a drug that is suitable for a person, what suits one may not suit others. I did go back to our GP, like anyone should if they have an issue or worry. I wanted to hear of others experiences with this particular drug. Drugs are there for a purpose, and hopefully provide a useful benefit. After the GP explaining his reasoning I did get Susan prescribed something else. I just find it worrying that the accompanying leaflet does not mention what the web site does. Namely Seroquel is not approved for these patients.
    Susan has now been prescribed Olanzapine (Zyprexa) and based on only having had one today, she is very much different. No talking to imaginary things and has not fallen asleep although she is much calmer and quieter. Also seems more co-operative and not agitated.
    cris
     
  3. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,749
    Kent
    Dear cris,

    I really hope the new drug Susan`s taking will give her long term benefit and so make life easier for you.

    Love xx
     
  4. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    16,127
    Toronto, Canada
    Cris,
    As you have found out, drugs and their effects on AD are very individual. My mother was originally on risperdone, then switched to olanzapine and is now on Seroquel. The switch to Seroquel was because of the increased risk of diabetes. There will always be side effects and dangers, we have to pick our way through them.

    I think it's more important that an AD patient be happier and settled.
     
  5. Trich

    Trich Registered User

    Aug 16, 2007
    31
    France
    Seroquel (Quetipine)

    Hi Chris,
    My dad was diagnosed with L.B.Dementia and prescribed Quetipine. Like yourself I researched the drug and was very worried when I found that it was not supposed to be prescribed for the elderly who had heart problems (my dad was waiting for a pacemaker because of heart problems). I did speak to the hospital doctor but was told that the information was not relevant in the UK and seems to originate in the US. It is their Drug Administration who have posted the warning on packs of the drug. Apparently there seems to be no restrictions on prescribing the drug here. Initially dad was very drowsy when given the medication, actually falling asleep on his dinner once. His body then seemed to get used to it and it did calm his moods down. He was being very agressive in the hospital and it was very worrying. His medication has now been upped to 2 tablets a day (without consultation with family again!) I don't know whether there is an alternative that would work and be less potoentially harmful but I do know that he does seem calmer and we have got a bit of our dad back. I'm afraid we are between the 'devil and the deep blue sea and totally at the mercy of the 'experts'. It feels like total trial and error and what works for one person seems to react badly on another. You are right to voice your concerns and I do hope that you find the right drugs for your wife.
    Take care
    TrichX
     
  6. CraigC

    CraigC Registered User

    Mar 21, 2003
    6,630
    London
    #26 CraigC, Oct 19, 2007
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2007
    Hi cris,

    Sorry to chime in late, but this thread is extremely interesting. I'd just like to add my experiences if it helps.

    My dad has been on quetiapine 25mg twice a day for over a year now. He is definitely a lot more settled and calmer than before. More importantly he seems more at one with himself (if that is possible with alzheimers!) rather then constantly agitated and painfully confused as he seemed before.

    The only negative effect on dad (as many have pointed out) is that dad can get very sleepy on occasions. In fact, it becomes almost impossible to wake him up when he drops off in the day. When he is active, he is very active and still wanders the floors and garden, but when he rests it becomes a real deep sleep.

    My reason for contributing is that I've been toying with asking the GP to review his medication again. I'm torn with dad seeming very balanced and calm at the moment and being concerned about the knock out sleep sessions. I'll see what the GP says and take it from there.

    I'm just going to mount my high horse for a bit:

    Whatever drugs that are recommended or prescribed carry some sort of risk. Pick any drug out of your medicine cabinet and read the leaflet - it can be terrifying. I just think you need to balance the benefits with the risks. It is also a fine line between someone being 'drugged up' as some people put it, or 'calm and stable'. The carers and people close to the person with dementia should be involved in assessing this, not just the medical experts.

    There is also a lot of negative publicity about these drugs. Personally I wish the people responsible for this negative publicity would speak to the relatives who need to make these difficult decisions on a day to day basis. We need to make informed choices and not live in fear.

    I'd also like to add that Seroquel/Quetiapine is also used for the treatment of sleep disorders, anxiety disorders, autism, tourettes, post-traumatic stress dissorder and OCD not just schizophrenia and behaviour problems.

    I'll step off my high horse now ;)

    Kind Regards
    Craig
     
  7. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    What a sensible post!

    As we all know, any medication for people with AD works for some, has no effect on other, and has potentially serious side-effects for still others.

    All we can do is try, and carefully monitor the situation to obtain the best possible balance.

    These leaflets and warnings are written by the legal departments of drug companies, simply to avoid them being sued if things go wrong. Every possible effect has to be mentioned so that thay can say 'We warned you'.

    For my part, I'm willing to try anything that will help, with the proviso that if I see any negative reaction, the medics will listen.
     
  8. Taffy

    Taffy Registered User

    Apr 15, 2007
    1,314
    Hi Cris, glad this new medication is having a positive effect even though it is early days, at least you can see some improvement with this drug. I hope it continues to be effective for Susan. Regards Taffy.
     
  9. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #29 Margarita, Oct 20, 2007
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2007
    That just what I thought , but at lest its good to known the risks , , as when cris read the leaflet at home it did not give any warning .


    Just like birth control pills given to young people and the risk of cancer in later years , so why not with this type of medication .

    Its not about negative publicity its about having a human right in knowing the risks, blanching the negative with the positive and having a choice

    sorry if I upset you Craig or anyone else in airing this out in TP, was not my intention .
     
  10. cynron

    cynron Registered User

    Sep 26, 2005
    429
    east sussex
    Well said Magarita you talk a lot of sense,my family did not know all of the warnings until we looked on the net.We were also alerted by a paramedic whom have extra knowledge of drugs in thier reference books that they have on board the ambulance.

    Cynthia x x
    .
     
  11. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #31 Margarita, Oct 20, 2007
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2007
    Thank- you cynron


    My brother was going to given a medication called Clozapine anti-psychotic medication CPN told us that he would need A blood count testing every week , as they a risk of death .

    We where going to go a head with it, but after assessment they though my brother may miss taking meditation or not go for 4 blood count testing .

    so left him on the medication his on , but at lest they told us the risk of death

    My point is knowledge - empowerment . knowledge of medication give us empowerment , take away fear .

    http://www.health24.com/news/Alzheimers_and_dementia/1-890,40613.asp
     
  12. EmJ

    EmJ Registered User

    Sep 26, 2007
    230
    Scotland
    I think a statement made earlier by Craig is important - "We need to make informed choices.."

    When making any decisions related to caring for someone you want to ensure you are making fully informed choices.

    Encouraging people to ask questions, to be aware of the information available and to discuss issues openly, therefore may help someone to make an informed choice.

    EmJ :)
     
  13. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    And isn't that just what TP's all about?:)
     
  14. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    16,127
    Toronto, Canada
    Right again, Hazel

    An informed choice is the best we can do. The experiences of everyone here, whether pro or con, are an excellent way for us to inform ourselves. Medical information is great but actual experience is invaluable.
     
  15. cris

    cris Registered User

    Aug 23, 2006
    326
    Chelmsford
    Thank You

    Thanks to everyone who posted, it helps to make that informed choice.
    I don't give Susan 2 aday but usually 1. It does not completely stop the visions but makes things much calmer. If you call laying the dining room chair over on to the floor as opposed to throwing it over. Walking around the house talking, banging doors, but a much calmer bang. Picking the right moment to give it, is tricky, not possible when angry, not too soon so as to fall asleep late afternoon.
    Thanks to each
    cris
     
  16. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,749
    Kent
    Dear cris,
    You really do have challenging behaviour from Susan, and I can only offer sympathy and some understanding.
    I`m pleased the medication has had some effect at least.
    Take care xx
     
  17. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Well done, cris, you've made your own informed choice.:)

    I hope the improvement continues, and Susan's challenging behaviour easier to manage.

    Thanks for posting.

    Love,
     
  18. fearful fiona

    fearful fiona Registered User

    Apr 19, 2007
    723
    London
    Thank you....

    ........ to Chris who started this thread and others who have given feedback.

    As my Mum is still getting very aggressive and not settling at all into the care home (with my dad who is most definitely settled), the psychiatrist has prescribed her a small dose - 25g - of Quetiapine possibly increasing. Having read all your feedback, I think we have to go with this, she just can't go on hitting people everytime they upset her. I will report back on how she gets on.

    Mum was recommended this medication while still at home, but the doctor decided to hold back until she was in the care home where it could be properly monitored. I'm pleased about that.
     
  19. fearful fiona

    fearful fiona Registered User

    Apr 19, 2007
    723
    London
    Sorry Cris, mis- spelt your name!!!!

    :eek: :eek: :eek:
     
  20. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    hope your also getting support for you , so you can get a break :)
     

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