Care home's responsibility for A&E attendance

Discussion in 'Welcome and how to use Dementia Talking Point' started by Jill1966, Mar 23, 2019.

  1. Jill1966

    Jill1966 Registered User

    Aug 5, 2013
    9
    County Durham
    Just really wanted to know what people feel about this. In the last three months, mum, who's 86 and in a residential care home (self funded) has had an ambulance called four times. One time she ended up staying in A&E, short stay for 36 hours, once the paramedics checked her out and didn't take her, and the other two occasions, she's had routine tests, and been discharged. Each time, and rightly so, the care home have telephoned me to see if I can go. One occasion I was actually in Northern Ireland visiting my son (a few nights away, typical it would happen then!) and then on the other times I've been unable to go because of work. Needless to say, if I thought it was serious, I would do everything possible to get out of work commitments and go. On each occasion the care home have asked if at all possible I could go, and rightly or wrongly, I have felt guilty that I have had to say I can't. I completely understand that the sending carers from the care home may leave them short staffed, and wonder if their care sort of ends at the door of the care home. The last time was on Thursday morning, when I did go down to A&E, saw mum from the corridor and into a side room, and ascertained that although she was confused, she was well. I told A&E that I was going back to work, and phoned the care home to let them know the situation.
     
  2. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,509
    Female
    Most members on here have said they are asked to accompany a relative to A&E, and if that doesn't happen the PWD (person with dementia) is unaccompanied.

    My mother's care home go above and beyond, which I think is unusual. They always inform me me asap, but they send an accompanying carer to A&E who stays with her either until she is admitted or discharged. My mother has had 3 A&E visits in the past year, and was admitted to a ward for the first two. The only time they specifically asked if I could take over from the carer was when she broke her hip and had to wait several hours before being admitted, but as it happened I arrived just as she arrived on the ward. It's understandable they ask you to accompany her, but sometimes that may not be possible for a variety of reasons.
     
  3. Rosettastone57

    Rosettastone57 Registered User

    Oct 27, 2016
    978
    My mother-in-law was taken to hospital once while she was in care and a carer went with her. She was never admitted though. We were told afterwards she had gone there. Obviously not asking a family member to accompany her was unusual, from the experience on here
     
  4. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,509
    Female
    I wonder if it's partly down to how they perceive your relationship. I think many people would want to accompany their mother, but personally I don't, and I seem to remember you felt the same. On the most recent occasion I was told she'd fallen and cut her head, she was okay but they had called paramedics to be on the safe side. I was then only contacted again when she'd been glued up at A&E and returned to the care home. But yes, I think it's unusual for a carer to accompany.
     
  5. Kikki21

    Kikki21 Registered User

    Feb 27, 2016
    1,962
    Female
    East Midlands
    My mum was not accompanied by a carer on her admittance to hospital on this occasion & the care home did not have the staff for anyone to accompany her. We thought that she was not going to be admitted as she was saying she was in pain & was being sick - thought she might have a bug & that her A&E stay would be minimal since she was admitted in the early hrs on a midweek.
    How wrong we were! It took 8 hrs for a dr to finally see to her at A&E & things progressed so much that now she is on end of life meds.
     
  6. chickenlady

    chickenlady Registered User

    Feb 28, 2016
    94
    I always preferred relatives to stay with their loved ones as frequently the young carers sent knew nothing about the patient and had so little in common that they found it hard to make conversation for hours whilst results came back or a bed was found on a ward. If relatives were a long way away then we would call them and give an update but I always rated care homes by the standard of escort they sent and that person's ability to care rather than just play on their phone. Provided that your Mum is not prone to wandering and is not distressed then she is probably Ok for a short while on her own in A&E but it's a very difficult environment for a dementia sufferer.
     
  7. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,509
    Female
    I understand why you say that but I'd say that depends on the relationship. My mother is likely to have been far more comfortable being escorted by a carer she knew well from her daily life. When I arrived she barely noticed I was there.
     

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