care home safety

Discussion in 'Legal and financial issues' started by jemacy, Sep 13, 2015.

  1. jemacy

    jemacy Registered User

    Sep 13, 2015
    6
    Can anyone give me advice please? My mother who has advanced dementia is resident in a care home. One of the staff was recently prosecuted for physically abusing mother. However the case could not be proved because of differences in evidence provided by other members of staff. I am very worried that the person concerned will be able to return to work and have direct contact with mother as well as the other member of staff who supported her. What would be my best course of action to protect mother?
     
  2. PeggySmith

    PeggySmith Registered User

    Apr 16, 2012
    1,683
    BANES
    Just want to give your post a bump to the top so the people who are more knowledgeable will see it.

    If I were you, I'd go and see the CH manager tomorrow and put your concerns to them. It may be that the person concerned won't be coming back anyway.

    Good luck and try not to worry too much.
     
  3. Poppyfields

    Poppyfields Registered User

    Sep 12, 2013
    69
    #3 Poppyfields, Sep 13, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2015
    I am not an expert, just dealing with a similar situation

    Perhaps contacting the local authority that the home comes under might be an idea if you feel your concerns are falling on deaf ears.

    Mentioning Safeguarding as abuse has happened - who is now going to take responsibility if this person is allowed back to work

    Put everything in writing, do not have any phone conversations unless you record them - I sound paranoid but my experience is that social workers/care home staff are really not above colluding with each other (and yes sometimes lying I'm afraid) in order to protect their jobs

    Lastly, install a "nanny cam" - not getting into the legal issues, but I would assume you had quite a lot of proof for this person to be prosecuted = so this time it would give you irrefutable evidence and also may alert you in advance
     
  4. jemacy

    jemacy Registered User

    Sep 13, 2015
    6
    #4 jemacy, Sep 13, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2015
     
  5. jemacy

    jemacy Registered User

    Sep 13, 2015
    6
    Thank you so much for your advice, it is really helpful.
     
  6. jemacy

    jemacy Registered User

    Sep 13, 2015
    6
    I am going to see the CH manager today and will ask her who is going to take responsibility for mother's safety as suggested. Thank you again for all your advice I really appreciate your help.
     
  7. Poppyfields

    Poppyfields Registered User

    Sep 12, 2013
    69
    I recommend recording the conversation on your phone.

    If you feel that you need to ask permission and the CH manager refuses, then there is a problem

    Insist on knowing who is going to be directly responsible if this person (and the other member of staff?) are going to be anywhere near your mother.
     
  8. jemacy

    jemacy Registered User

    Sep 13, 2015
    6
    Thank you Poppy fields. I took a witness with me today and spoke to CH General Manager who assured us that the staff member concerned would have no contact with mother. She would be moved to the downstairs units, mother is upstairs in one of the 3 dementia units. She gave me the names of the new staff she has moved onto the unit and who will be responsible. She also asked me not to move mother to another home. Thank you for advising what questions to ask. I am very grateful.
     
  9. PeggySmith

    PeggySmith Registered User

    Apr 16, 2012
    1,683
    BANES
    You must be feeling very relieved.
     
  10. Poppyfields

    Poppyfields Registered User

    Sep 12, 2013
    69
    I'm pleased that you feel reassured

    I'm also disgusted that this person is back at work :mad:
     
  11. Slugsta

    Slugsta Registered User

    I was just going to say this. I'm all for giving someone a second chance - but not when that involves being in contact with more vulnerable people!
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.