Care home refusing to take my mum back after stay in private hospital

Discussion in 'Recently diagnosed and early stages of dementia' started by Anotherdamnlol, May 10, 2015.

  1. Anotherdamnlol

    Anotherdamnlol Registered User

    May 2, 2015
    23
    #1 Anotherdamnlol, May 10, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: May 11, 2015
    Mum was in a care home for 3 weeks then they called an ambulance to take her to A&E because she wasn't eating, drinking or taking her meds. Part of the problem was severe thrush of the mouth.
    After a week I transferred her to a private hospital for the thrush of the mouth. While in there I paid a private psychiatrist to assess my mum as I was getting nowhere with the NHS getting a psychiatrist to see her, been trying for months.
    Brain scan clear except some old damage from two old silent strokes. Psychiatrist diagnosed vascular dementia and alzheimers but was unable to do the cognitive tests as my mum just wasn't with it.
    Pyschiatrist took her off mirtazapine which had done nothing for 4 months and put her on traduzole and memantine.
    Thrush cleared up but mum still refusing to take all her meds (she's on a lot of different tablets). But eating and drinking a bit better.
    The care home manager came to do an assessment yesterday and called me this morning to say they cant take her back in the care home because of her diagnosis and the fact she is not eating, drinking and fully taking her meds. She has no beds available on the high needs floor.
    My mum is due to be discharged from private hospital tomorrow and is now homeless. Can a care home really "evict" someone with no notice and no alternative arrangements?
    I have no idea what to do, mum still doesn't have a social worker or an NHS psychiatrist.
     
  2. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,776
    Salford
    #2 Kevinl, May 11, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: May 11, 2015
    Sorry Anotherdamnlol but if the care home doesn't have the capability/capacity to deal with her they have no alternative. Harsh as that may sound there are rules they have to follow both legally and morally and also very unprofessional.
    If she was being discharged from an NHS hospital the NHS would label her a "bed blocker" but be stuck with her until social services sorted something out. As private care is doing the discharge then I have no idea what happens, there has to be a safety net and I would suggest that social services is your first port of call.
    Say she is a "vulnerable adult" and see what happens, whether she is or was in the public or private sector she remains a citizen of this country and they have a duty of care to see she is taken care of and they have a legal responsibility to ensure she isn't "out on the street", however, it might get difficult as self funders who have private care may not be on the top of the pile, however, they may have options you could look for ages to find.
    K
     
  3. starryuk

    starryuk Registered User

    Nov 8, 2012
    1,300
    #3 starryuk, May 11, 2015
    Last edited: May 11, 2015
    I just want to wish you well for sorting things out for your mum today.

    I do agree with Kevini, though, that if the CH cannot 'meet your mum's needs' for whatever reason, then it is right that they tell you now.

    Can the hospital recommend somewhere for your mum to convalesce maybe? In the hope that your mum could return to her CH when she has recovered more? Or to give you more time to find somewhere else suitable for her?
     
  4. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,803
    Female
    South coast
    If a care home is unable to provide for some-ones needs then they are not allowed to accept them, so you are in an unfortunate situation. I assume the problem is the diagnosis of dementia.
    Will she be self-funding? If she is you may find that there is limited help from social services. Your best bet may be to make inquiries about care homes/dementia units yourself and choose one that will accept her. Im afraid I dont know what happens in the meantime as she is in a private hospital.
     
  5. Anotherdamnlol

    Anotherdamnlol Registered User

    May 2, 2015
    23
    So to give you an up date on what happened:

    I called Social Services, they referred me to the NHS social work team who referred me back to social services. Couldn't get help anywhere. Had 6 hours to go and find another care home.

    I totally agree that if a care home cant meet your needs they shouldnt accept you. But once they have accepted you and you live there surely they cant evict you with no notice?

    The Care Quality Commission seem to agree with me and after I had found my mum another care home they suggested I submit a formal complaint to the care home and copy them in.

    I have also submitted a formal complaint to the Director of Social Services and my MP.

    All three have acknowledge receipt of my complaint and have all stated they will now be doing an investigation.
    I don't hold my breath, just hope the care home will think twice about evicting a resident in the future.
     
  6. jan.s

    jan.s Registered User

    Sep 20, 2011
    7,352
    I was in a similar situation a couple of years ago, and I sought advice from a variety of sources.

    Whilst the care home found your mum difficult to care for, the care home is her home. It is not permissible to evict somebody from their home in this situation without notice, or allowing you time to find a reasonable alternative that can cater for your mum's needs.

    That was the advice I was given.
     
  7. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,776
    Salford
    Surely though if the care home are unqualified to take her back with her new needs then what can they do, take her back and hope for the best? A care home isn't a nursing home and not all can cope with complex medical needs.
    It'll be interesting to see what the CQC say. What would happen if the person concerned lived with you? Could you be forced to take them back even if you knew you couldn't cope? The logic of hospitals forcing people out and into a situation where they cannot be cared for properly doesn't really add up to me. It is for precisely this reason we have what the NHS call "Bed Blockers".
    There have been many tales on here where a hospital want to sent someone back to the home of one of their children who has been caring for them, however, they feel they can't cope, could they make them do it too.
    K
     
  8. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,438
    I think what would have happened had it been possible to force the care home to take her back that they would have immediately called an ambulance and had her taken back to an NHS hospital.
     
  9. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,776
    Salford
    I think that's part of the issue, it's not an NHS hospital that's discharging her it's a private hospital. If it was an NHS hospital and the care home refused to take her back citing their inability to meet her needs then they would be obliged to keep her and sort something out with social services.
    K
     
  10. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,438
    Thst was my point.
     

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