1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Tender Face

    Tender Face Account Closed

    Mar 14, 2006
    5,379
    NW England
    My husband has just alerted me to the fact that this feature is an article of 'breaking news' on a satelite TV channel news programme ......

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/6929482.stm

    Just me being touchy.... (as per :eek: ) .....but I don't like the use of the word 'burden' and the context in which it is used .......

    As with the Pointon 'discussions' - is all publicity 'good' publicity?

    I do hope eventually it will all achieve a greater good. A difficult week for those who's lives are affected by the media spotlight in different ways this week ......

    Thinking of all who may be affected, Love, Karen (TF), x
     
  2. DickG

    DickG Registered User

    Feb 26, 2006
    558
    Stow-on-the-Wold
    Karen

    Thanks for the pointer to good news. To highlight what some of us already know is a positive step but the proof of the pudding.....

    I will accept the use of the word "burden" and anything else as long as it benefits us carers and our loved ones. Would the Disability Discrimination Act come into force if there had been no upsetting images of the disabled? I am lucky to be born with a thick skin and am prepared to put up with a lot for the greater good.

    Love

    Dick
     
  3. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Hi Karen

    I appreciate all our sensitivities in these issues and the way they are worded, but I just checked the definition of burden at http://www.answers.com/topic/burden?cat=biz-fin

    includes:

    I accept all these in this context.

    I do appreciate that common usage may sometimes differ...:(
     
  4. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Have to say I agree with you Dick:

    My skin is not particulaly thick, but my Lionel means so much to me.

    My knowledge of him, as a person, and insight into AD gleaned from all sorts of sources, is enabling me to help in keeping him calm and comfortable.
     
  5. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    The article is about the 'spiralling burden of Alzheimer's on society'. I don't think any of us could argue with that. It is a huge burden on NHS and Social Services resources, and if that message gets through, more funds may be made available for research and treatment.

    Nowhere does it refer to individual sufferers as a burden to their carers. I'd be the first to protest at that.
     
  6. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    I think the article is good newa.
    We must bang the drum at every chance that we get,I will.
    Norman
     
  7. Tender Face

    Tender Face Account Closed

    Mar 14, 2006
    5,379
    NW England
    Maybe I don't like someone - anyone - being reduced to a statistic - and the cost of their care when they are vulnerable being expressed in monetary terms ..... and a cost to 'society'??? The one that turns its back??????

    Those who know me - some more than others - know I have a passion for child welfare - a group of people who have rights, but no means to exercise it for themselves .... no income to control for themselves .... no voice to be heard unless their carers or dedicated professionals speak up ...... . at times I see little difference with dementia sufferers ..... except chidren are not seen as a burden to society although their 'rights' and their vulnerabilities are little different from those we all care for - or know of - through dementia - at whatever age ....

    Because people are adults does not deny them vulnerability, nor to be stereo-typed as a 'burden' - in fact, more importantly ... adults who become vulnerable have had chance to contribute in some way to society in a way in children have not been allowed to gift their promise to us ...

    I ask only for respect for those who have already given .... while we invest (and rightly) in those who have yet to give ......

    I agree Dick, that this is great and good news, but I would ask that those directly affected are treated with the respect they deserve for living the reality and not the language which befits the theory of economists ....... :mad:

    Karen, x
     
  8. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    I ask for much more than that. I demand respect and investment.
     
  9. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Big thanks to Karen for surfacing the piece, which contains some good facts - though the way they are couched is not good, and leads to wrong interpretation.

    .. tell that to Nice..!
    OK so the government understands. Now tell Nice
    Things not defined well
    I'm guessing they are not including the opportunity costs - spouses and family members stopping paid work - losing money to the family and to the tax system; the costs to the NHS of the treatment of carers, necessary because of the strain of the role; costs of broken families because of the stress etc etc

    to defend the article, it does not categorise the people who have dementia as a burden, rather the dementia itself.
     
  10. daughter

    daughter Registered User

    Mar 16, 2005
    824
  11. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Thanks for that link, Hazel. Let's hope it's not just another press release that fizzles out.

    It's certainly a hopeful sign.
     
  12. elaineo2

    elaineo2 Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    945
    leigh lancashire
    Burden on society

    Sorry if anyone disagrees with me but I don't see Alzheimers/Dementia as a burden.I see it as a disease that has no cure.A disease that can tear sufferers and their families to pieces.I have had a few family members pass away from the dreaded cancer.Is this cancer not a burden on society then?some develop it for no particular reason,others through sunbeds,smoking etc.Yet cancer is treated without an eyelash batted.Alzheimers/Dementia is treated with contempt by NICE.Sorry no offence intended to anyone the word BURDEN got my goat alittle bit.love elainex
     
  13. Ashburton

    Ashburton Registered User

    Feb 19, 2007
    99
    Have to say agree with you, AD has a very low profile.As you said Cancer etc is treated completely differently. AD is underfunded imo and carers receive no official recognition.
     
  14. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    to be fair, there are treatments for conditions other than dementia that NICE will not agree to - and some cancer treatments are included in that.
     
  15. Lonestray

    Lonestray Registered User

    Aug 3, 2006
    236
    Hereford
    Burden

    Well put Karen, couldn't have put it better. You don't have to be told you're a burden to society once your over a certain age. It doesn't feel inclusive. Your like the kid who's sent out for an ice cream and when you return home only to find a 'Sold' sign outside and family gone!
    Padraig
     
  16. Nebiroth

    Nebiroth Registered User

    Aug 20, 2006
    3,518
    so that people and their relatives feel able to seek support at the earliest possible stage in the knowledge they will get expert help and be treated with dignity and respect

    Hah. Presumeably that includes being told "so sorry, there are drugs that could help, but you're not sick enough to get those because they cost more than looking after you without them does at this point in your illness"
     

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