Brainwork 'holds of Alzheimers'

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by CraigC, Sep 28, 2005.

  1. CraigC

    CraigC Registered User

    Mar 21, 2003
    6,630
    London
    Not sure if anyone came across this article in the Daily Mail, but it is now available online.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/li...ain.html?in_article_id=363366&in_page_id=1774

    Just thought it may stimulate some reaction, hopefully directed at the Daily Mail letters pages (that's what I will be doing). I wonder if Dr Andel studied a decent cross section of the population! and how he came to this conclussion. I'm personally very sceptical as I hear more and more stories of peoples past lives visiting homes and meeting relatives. My father like many had very challenging job and did 'complex' work right until the day he retired. He then continued to stimulate his mind even after the onset of alzheimer's. I really can't believe there is any connection between peoples jobs and the onset of dementia. The study and its conclussions are is misleading and insulting in my opinion.

    Kind Regards
    Craig
     
  2. daughter

    daughter Registered User

    Mar 16, 2005
    824
    #2 daughter, Sep 28, 2005
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2005
    Hmmm, I'm inclined to agree with you Craig. Admittedly, my Dad was a manual worker but he was always doing crosswords.

    I suppose we could set up a poll here, (just for interest of course - I analyse data for a living and I would never trust statistics! :p )

    Best wishes,

    PS. What did you think about the other article on green tea?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/li...ain.html?in_article_id=363149&in_page_id=1774
     
  3. rummy

    rummy Registered User

    Jul 15, 2005
    700
    Oklahoma,USA
    I have heard this before but have wondered how they can account for all the people with alzheimers that had intellectual or otherwise knowledge based professions.

    President Regan for one!

    Debbie
     
  4. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    15,975
    Toronto, Canada
    One facet the sturdy did not address was the economic side of the equation. People who become lawyers, doctors etc tend to come from economically privileged backgrounds. Maybe there's a nutritional basis in early life. Maybe it's because wealthy people get better medical care all their lives. Maybe with all that money family members with AD, which still has a great stigma, are better hidden away and their disease covered up. I'd put my money (what I have of it) on that one.

    Maybe it's because sharks don't get Alzheimer's - but that would apply to lawyers only. (Just kidding folks).

    All I know is that my mother did crosswords every day and read extensively - murder mysteries (because of the puzzle element), history and so on. She also read the newspaper every day. She worked mostly in accounting all her life. She was a bright and clever person and now I'm left with her shell.

    I have heard this argument before but then what about Iris Murdoch? Now there's someone whose life was entirely of the mind.

    The study seems badly constructed and shoddy. Craig, I'm with you.
     
  5. Lulu

    Lulu Registered User

    Nov 28, 2004
    391
    My mum had a supervisory role ...
     
  6. CraigC

    CraigC Registered User

    Mar 21, 2003
    6,630
    London
    #6 CraigC, Sep 28, 2005
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2005
    Hi Hazel et all,

    I read the article on green tea, thanks. I've kicked caffeine and tried all sorts of teas and drinks, but green tea is hard to stomach must admit. I'd heard of the connection for helping prevent cancer but not alzheimer's. Interesting though.

    I'm starting to think that there is no sure way to avoid the Alzheimer's lottery. My dad had such a healthy lifestyle and diet. The article just triggered one of those angry moments, just now and then while your dealing with all this stuff, you get to thinking WHY. My dad once said that if anything serious happened to me, and he couldn't fix it, he'd find out why it happened and then do all he could to make sure it never happened to anyone else. One of my many attractions to the alzheimer's society. But articles and research like this are just plain unhelpful in my opinion and take the focus away from serious medical research.

    kind regards
    Craig
     
  7. daughter

    daughter Registered User

    Mar 16, 2005
    824
    Doh! sorry Craig, and I've just set up a poll! :eek:

    PS I agree with what you say about there's seemingly "no way to avoid the alzheimers lottery". :(
     
  8. CraigC

    CraigC Registered User

    Mar 21, 2003
    6,630
    London
    No problem at all Hazel....

    Sorry, didn't mean to say that the discussion/information wasn't interesting, it was just the way the the conclussion was drawn in the article/research like it was some sort of amazing discovery that no one had thought of before. Ground breaking stuff! Was ranting as usual and trying to stimulate discussion.

    A poll would be harmless, but a £200,000 (that's a wild guess BTW) research project on the subject would be was ill spent in my opinion ;)

    kind regards
    Craig
     
  9. Kriss

    Kriss Registered User

    May 20, 2004
    513
    Shropshire
    My Aunt spent the majority of her working life as a research chemist then latterly as a teacher and once retired as an accountant. Hardly "brain dead" professions!

    Kriss
     
  10. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    I agree with Craig,there is always someone running a research project and producing wonderful new theories,for in the end that is all they are theories.
    I do not believe Alzheimer's Disease is common to any one group.
    I thought about a few people around me that were victims of this horrible disease and what were their occupations.
    A few that I have known personally:Head Master and JP,Policeman,environmental officer,Seaman,Secretary,Policewoman,politicain and many Housewives.
    Can't see much similarity there !!
    Norman
     
  11. jc141265

    jc141265 Registered User

    Sep 16, 2005
    836
    Australia
    Brainwork, or is that %$%(rhymes with pass)work?

    Dad was a mainframe computer programmer, then operations manager of a factory then General Manager, his brain was super-powered, I've never met anyone in my whole life as smart.

    He did however come from a VERY poor background.
     
  12. daughter

    daughter Registered User

    Mar 16, 2005
    824
    Uh-huh! See what I mean about stats - there's always yet another variable that can be added to the analysis! :)
     
  13. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    15,975
    Toronto, Canada
    I agree, Hazel, right now everything is a guess about causes. So far, except for the genetic early onset type of AD, we haven't any firm idea about what causes it. Lots of theories, no absolute facts.

    I think it just happens. I don't think they will find one great overwhelming cause. There may be lots of little, incremental pushes but I think that will be all.

    It's very irritating to me that there seems to be an element of blame somehow - as if it's to do with one's choice of work or diet (the old aluminium pot thing) or reading or lack of reading etc etc etc. It just happens. It certainly happens more frequently as one ages so that's a factor. But I'm sick of the blame game. Bad things happen for no reason in this world. I don't need or want my mother blamed for her disease. :mad:
     
  14. rummy

    rummy Registered User

    Jul 15, 2005
    700
    Oklahoma,USA
    Well said Joanne,
    I think I've just been looking for reasons why, not blame. Perhaps if I know why Mom got it then maybe I can avoid it by doing something differently.
    The neurologist told me that my Mom's AD wasn't caused by drinking or anything else and that even though it is a genetic disease, it isn't hereditary. ( Guess I'll test that one out in a few years :eek: )
    Mom was a credit manager for General Electric. When she retired she turned to crafts and gardening.
    Since it doesn't hurt to drink green tea and read, I think I'll do it even if it doesn't work! At least I'll feel proactive. :)

    Debbie
     

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