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‘Smart socks’ to keep dementia carers on their toes by tracking patients’ stress levels

Sarasa

Volunteer Host
Apr 13, 2018
4,836
0
Nottinghamshire
That link was behind a paywall for me, so if it is the same for you here is a link to the BBC article on the subject
It sounds like a fascinating idea and I'd love to know how it works in practice. My mum would have spectacular meltdowns when she got too stressed, so being able to head them off would have been good. However I'd have had to get her to wear the socks in the first place and not living with her, that probably wouldn't have worked.
 

jugglingmum

Registered User
Jan 5, 2014
6,305
0
Chester
I've just read the article and wondered if it meant charged. Ie the r is missing as it also mentions they are machine washable
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
18,427
0
South coast
Thanks for that link @Sarasa - it was behind a paywall for me too.
How can they not need to be changed?
I think it means that the technology doesnt have to be removed from the sock ie the sock is not changed from the technology, rather than the PWD doesnt change the sock.
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
3,190
0
High Peak
I think most carers are well aware when their PWD's stress levels are rising. With mum, the snarling and growling was always a bit of a giveaway.

However, I do think wearable tech may have a place in dementia care. I think a device that monitored such things as sugar levels, hydration and blood pressure could be very useful.
 

Canadian Joanne

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 8, 2005
17,493
0
68
Toronto, Canada
I agree that technology can be quite useful. The problem is finding something a PWD will tolerate. My mother removed three medical alert bracelets and threw them away and they are not technology. I gave up at that point.
 

jugglingmum

Registered User
Jan 5, 2014
6,305
0
Chester
I think most carers are well aware when their PWD's stress levels are rising. With mum, the snarling and growling was always a bit of a giveaway.

I'm assuming they've got some algorithm which they anticipate will spot things before any visible signs.

Also crucial is the nature of the intervention as well. No point being able to predict things if nothing can be done.

Given developed in a care home and aimed at mid to late stages also indicates to me aimed at care home use where staff are on hand to deal with things.