Why are GP's NOT educated when it comes to Dementia?

Muttimuggle

Registered User
Dec 28, 2021
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It doesn't have to be water.Absolutely any fluid will do(except alcohol of course...and some fluids are obviously more healthy than others).It is always better to clear water infections(or cystitis- same thing but felt differently) without antibiotics if at all possible.They, in this country, are against prescribing too many so the bugs don't get too smart but it is not the best thing, anyway, for individuals to have too many repeated doses as they deplete nutrients in the gut. So it is about drinking more than you actually might feel you want to and spacing that evenly...so that your body never gets to to be dehydrated at any time throughout the day.Sometimes people's period of dehydration arises when they have spent a long time in bed- so even just having a long lie in without having a drink.Good luck with the water infection aspect of your mother's worsening cognition.There is not much else that can be done about the dementia bit though, sadly.
 

Toopie28

Registered User
Jun 7, 2022
283
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It doesn't have to be water.Absolutely any fluid will do(except alcohol of course...and some fluids are obviously more healthy than others).It is always better to clear water infections(or cystitis- same thing but felt differently) without antibiotics if at all possible.They, in this country, are against prescribing too many so the bugs don't get too smart but it is not the best thing, anyway, for individuals to have too many repeated doses as they deplete nutrients in the gut. So it is about drinking more than you actually might feel you want to and spacing that evenly...so that your body never gets to to be dehydrated at any time throughout the day.Sometimes people's period of dehydration arises when they have spent a long time in bed- so even just having a long lie in without having a drink.Good luck with the water infection aspect of your mother's worsening cognition.There is not much else that can be done about the dementia bit though, sadly.
Oh yes, I realise that. It's just going to get worse. The disease. And I see it.
(We do with tea and juice. She has about 5-6 cups a day. She has a juice that's diluted with water)

My main objective was that the infection is not going away.
The doctor insisted that she be involved and test the infection to pin down what it is.
Twice I get the urine sample to her (again, from afar so need to scramble with SIL to get it over there)
Twice I go through the "how do you know?"
Twice she tests with a stick. (The ones that I have at home.)
Meanwhile Ma is off. Add to that, she goes 10 times to the loo with just a "tiny bit" coming out.

It's the incompetence and stress that the doctors put you through.
And unfortunately, it's not just me :(
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
4,361
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Victoria, Australia
It doesn't have to be water.Absolutely any fluid will do(except alcohol of course...and some fluids are obviously more healthy than others).It is always better to clear water infections(or cystitis- same thing but felt differently) without antibiotics if at all possible.They, in this country, are against prescribing too many so the bugs don't get too smart but it is not the best thing, anyway, for individuals to have too many repeated doses as they deplete nutrients in the gut. So it is about drinking more than you actually might feel you want to and spacing that evenly...so that your body never gets to to be dehydrated at any time throughout the day.Sometimes people's period of dehydration arises when they have spent a long time in bed- so even just having a long lie in without having a drink.Good luck with the water infection aspect of your mother's worsening cognition.There is not much else that can be done about the dementia bit though, sadly.
And then you run into another problem when the person has chronic heart failure and has to limit their fluids so they don’t get clogged up with edema. Then one of the medications gives him dry mouth.

And if he doesn’t drink enough, his blood pressure plummets. Just goes on and on!
 

Muttimuggle

Registered User
Dec 28, 2021
710
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And then you run into another problem when the person has chronic heart failure and has to limit their fluids so they don’t get clogged up with edema. Then one of the medications gives him dry mouth.

And if he doesn’t drink enough, his blood pressure plummets. Just goes on and on!
Yes, it gets very hard...and feels very unfair when doing what would feel like the healthiest thing is not the best.It is also true of advanced chronic kidney disease where not only certain foods need to be restricted because the body cannot deplete them through urine and swelling and edema start instead. For the moment, with my own CKD, I keep drinking and flushing as much as I possibly can. Until someone can't manage the fluids they have to keep having them as much as they can, I suppose.
 

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
6,266
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Salford
Because the G in GP stands for General. They vary in quality but too many "seem" from what I've read on here over the years to be very reluctant to spot/acknowledge the signs. Maybe that's just my experience, mum first then my wife.
Maybe more specialist doctors or nurses would help...well you can dream.
K
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
23,397
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Southampton
i had a gp once who i contacted because of my husbands aggression. she said that she didnt have enough experience of what to prescribe for him as it was vascular dementia so referred us to OPMH. i actually appreciated that she acknowledged she wasnt the best person to deal with it and that she referred us to someone with more expertise. i think sometimes its more helpful as they have general knowledge but not expert in specific conditions.
 

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
6,266
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Salford
Fair comment Jennifer,but, i did say that was only my experience both times, mum first then wife (although it is debatable who was looking after whome.
All I can say is round here it didn't work for me or either of the (late) ladies in my life and neither are in a position to argue (without a Ouija board).
K
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
23,397
0
Southampton
Fair comment Jennifer,but, i did say that was only my experience both times, mum first then wife (although it is debatable who was looking after whome.
All I can say is round here it didn't work for me or either of the (late) ladies in my life and neither are in a position to argue (without a Ouija board).
K
some are useless and dont even try to understand. ive met a few of them as well. some are just not interested. it helps if they are honest rather than bumbling along.
 

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
6,266
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Salford
some are useless and dont even try to understand. ive met a few of them as well. some are just not interested. it helps if they are honest rather than bumbling along.
I hope/pressume it's the medical community you're talking about not me?
K
 

Lawson58

Registered User
Aug 1, 2014
4,361
0
Victoria, Australia
Because the G in GP stands for General. They vary in quality but too many "seem" from what I've read on here over the years to be very reluctant to spot/acknowledge the signs. Maybe that's just my experience, mum first then my wife.
Maybe more specialist doctors or nurses would help...well you can dream.
K
Yes, but they are expected to do lots of training (in Australia anyway) before they get their certification. They are supposed to be jack of all trades but master of none. Our GP will always say that he doesn’t know something and we appreciate that.

And our specialist doctor was more than useless.
 

Toopie28

Registered User
Jun 7, 2022
283
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We're all going through this hell together @Kevinl - love that by the way. And going to use it in my head, if you don't mind.

Some may have had different experiences with their doctors (GP's) but for the most part - it's what we are stuck with. @jennifer1967 - admirable that your GP knew her limitations.

I'll never forget when I had to have Ma assessed.
This very young doctor went through the test they give and she asked Ma to spell "World" backwards.
I said, um she wouldn't really know that anyway - maybe in Italian but not backwards...
Pfftttt, she said - I would think she could at least do that...
It took all my might not to lunge at her.

The doctor that is educated in dementia was brilliant with her. She ended up ripping up the test and said - ok, let's talk.
 

Gasnthat

Registered User
Jun 6, 2022
11
0
In October my wife's congnivity took a sudden turn for the worse. I got a test and she had cystitis. After two months and no return to "normal" I took her (she was reluctant) back to the doctor's, resulting in a negative test for a U T I. The doctor ordered blood tests and the result was a vitamin B12 deficiency. Long story, short after googling it it's another reason for cognitive decline.
She is now on B12 with more blood tests in three months.
Moral is don't give up, keep insisting the doctor explores every possible cause.