Panorama programme

Neveradullday!

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Oct 12, 2022
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England
I watched the report/interview about this on BBC Breakfast before.
The experts say it's a really important first step (the 2 drugs).
Not a cure, they slow it down (for 5 - 12 months?). Side effects - swelling and bleeding from the brain. Everyone will have to have a CAT scan or lumbar puncture to diagnose (only 2% get this at the moment). Drugs need to be given intra-venously, every 2 or 4 weeks (can't remember). NHS not ready for this yet.
Diagnostic blood test for over 50s won't be ready for about 5 years.
 

Neveradullday!

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Oct 12, 2022
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England
I am sure I hear about different drugs and possibilities every few months?
That's right. In the interview this morning, it was said there have been many false dawns.
These drugs aren't even a cure.
At the end the medical expert did give tips on lifestyle to avoid dementia - diet, exercise, good heart health.
 

nitram

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Apr 6, 2011
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Bury
The E (emissive) is the clue.
Amyloid is not radiopaque so it has to be made to transmit something for detection, positrons (the P in PET) from an injected radioactive tracer that binds to amyloid.

Most hospitals have at least one CAT scanner, PET scanners are limited.
 

Jaded'n'faded

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Jan 23, 2019
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High Peak
At the end the medical expert did give tips on lifestyle to avoid dementia - diet, exercise, good heart health.
All the health and lifestyle suggestions for a healthy heart are also recommended 'to avoid dementia'. I question if it's possible to avoid dementia through diet, etc, though it may reduce your risk (who knows?) and doing all those good things is likely to make you live longer for various reasons.

Unfortunately, the biggest risk of getting dementia is simply being very old.

What was it Roger Daltrey said?
'Hope I die before I get old!'

I'm already fairly old, so I've amended this to: 'Hope I die before I get really old.' 😀
 

Neveradullday!

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Oct 12, 2022
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England
Yes, when I was young in the 1970s the average life expectancy was about 70 for men and 75 for women (I may be wrong), meaning many fewer dementia sufferers.

My life expectancy now is 84, with a one in four chance of 92 and one in ten of 97.
I may have to start living fast and loose! 😏
 

nitram

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Apr 6, 2011
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Bury
My life expectancy now is 84
Covid probably knocked a year off.

Expectancy at birth
2024-02-12_121807.png
 
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WJG

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Sep 13, 2020
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These drugs could be really important, but will only work with people diagnosed with early stage disease, confirmed by bio markers and scans. I happen to fall into this category but know I’m in a minority. The NHS will have to establish new treatment centres, though, as the drugs are taken by infusion and the very serious potential side effects will need careful monitoring. I am already hearing of friends who don’t feel the treatment worth the risk. We have a way still to go.
 

Jaded'n'faded

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Jan 23, 2019
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High Peak
Getting an early diagnosis is the big problem. The medics either fob people off about their concerns or want to wait and see if things get worse. Unless this approach changes, no one will get an early diagnosis.

Then there's the fact that a lot of people in the early stages are in complete denial and will refuse to seek help, so they've got no chance either.

If we get past those issues, the NHS will first need to buy a whole load of new scanners to do the necessary PET scans.
The NHS will have to establish new treatment centres
That's about as likely as the NHS opening nail bars and spas. Sorry but it just ain't gonna happen! But yes, anyone taking this drug must go to hospital every 2 weeks as it needs to be administered intravenously. That's going to be pretty difficult for a lot of people. And they will need further scans to monitor for brain bleeds. There's also a not-insignificant risk of death.

Personally, I think taking Viagra seems to be a better bet in terms of ease, cost and risk and possible benefits. Just my opinion...

 

MaNaAk

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Jun 19, 2016
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Essex
They've just said that a speedy diagnosis is crucial but what they didn't say is that some carers will have an uphill struggle to get their loved. I tried every trick in the book to get dad to the doctors!!!! The carer needs a series of programmes themselves!

MaNaAk
 
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Mumlikesflowers

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Aug 13, 2020
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You all got there before me. I probably wouldn't have watched a programme about dementia had I not run into it by accident. If these new drugs put the focus on getting quicker diagnosis (because you need to be early stage to benefit) then that does everyone a favour. They said at the end that only one in three with dementia get a formal diagnosis! My goodness. A man who was early 70s with school age children had a letter from the memory service saying now you have to wait 7 months for an assessment. This dementia journey is a super struggle. Wherever stress can be taken out, it should be. We have so far to go.
 

Rayreadynow

Registered User
Dec 31, 2023
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The Consultant gave my PWD a diagnosis of Lewys Body , but I read that can not really be confirmed just by an assessment.
 

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