No activities

nancymay

Registered User
Oct 12, 2023
15
0
My sister is in a dementia unit , she's aware she's somewhere that she doesn't want to be , I used to be an activity coordinator and it frustrates me that the home advertises several activities but nothing takes place , the residents are just sat there with the TV on there's no interaction, nothing they can pick up and look at , several residents get aggressive as they are bored , I worry my sister will decline with no stimulation, we have addressed it to the manager and the only odd activities are a day trip out or listening to music , we have bought several things for my sister for in her room but then she's isolated , can this be right to have nothing available for the residents.
 

Violet Jane

Registered User
Aug 23, 2021
2,114
0
In my experience, homes often promise more than they deliver on the activities side. Is there actually an activities co-ordinator at the home? If there isn't, then there's not likely to be much going on as the carers are unlikely to organise anything. Even if there are activities there needs to be enough staff to help the residents to access them.
 

Angel55

Registered User
Oct 23, 2023
198
0
My sister is in a dementia unit , she's aware she's somewhere that she doesn't want to be , I used to be an activity coordinator and it frustrates me that the home advertises several activities but nothing takes place , the residents are just sat there with the TV on there's no interaction, nothing they can pick up and look at , several residents get aggressive as they are bored , I worry my sister will decline with no stimulation, we have addressed it to the manager and the only odd activities are a day trip out or listening to music , we have bought several things for my sister for in her room but then she's isolated , can this be right to have nothing available for the residents.
💗 Hello

Is it right? of course not ...

I think it may vary greatly and if there are activities it can be that those are more a one size fits all rather than taking the extra time to get to know people's interests and abilities as well as encouragement/support that older or younger might need to joint in.

They do offer activities and events where Dad is but I sometimes wonder if anyone evaluates them as purposeful and/or enjoyable. Dad refuses to join in anything which is a great shame but we keep trying.

It is a shame your sister's only offer music ? and the odd day out. Do they have an activity organiser there?
 

Kristo

Registered User
Apr 10, 2023
119
0
Have you asked the home, maybe via email so that it is in writing, to clarify their activity programme? Maybe ask if they can send out a weekly overview of the planned activities, so that you can plan your visits around them? That may encourage them to do a bit more. Or you could send in activity suggestions, even if they just plan a board game afternoon (my Dad’s care home has Kerplunk and Hungry Hippos, lots of fun!) or a colouring/painting session. They could even decorate some biscuits. None of these are expensive activities but they might help to stave off some of the boredom and restlessness. Let us know how you get on, good luck!
 

Violet Jane

Registered User
Aug 23, 2021
2,114
0
One wonders what those activities coordinators are doing then. Of course, each of them may work very part time.
 

nancymay

Registered User
Oct 12, 2023
15
0
We have sent lots of emails but no reply , I have asked for a meeting with the manager , hopefully we will get some answers, I've asked for the activity programme but it doesn't take place what has been put on , there just doesn't seem to be any interaction for the residents, I'll letvyou know how the meeting goes , thankyou for your reply .
Have you asked the home, maybe via email so that it is in writing, to clarify their activity programme? Maybe ask if they can send out a weekly overview of the planned activities, so that you can plan your visits around them? That may encourage them to do a bit more. Or you could send in activity suggestions, even if they just plan a board game afternoon (my Dad’s care home has Kerplunk and Hungry Hippos, lots of fun!) or a colouring/painting session. They could even decorate some biscuits. None of these are expensive activities but they might help to stave off some of the boredom and restlessness. Let us know how you get on, good luck!
 

sdmhred

Registered User
Jan 26, 2022
2,443
0
Surrey
Yes you wonder what those activity co-ordinators are doing?! ! Maybe things are so short staffed they end up doing regular care.
mums home have a team of 3 (53 residents) one FT and two PT and there is something on each morning and afternoon. Often very simple like music or bingo. We get sent a weekly timetable. They also buy a lot in so singers, animals etc.
mum is late stage now so can’t ‘do ‘ much but she enjoys going when she gets the opportunity. I dropped her at art group this week and the lady said mum was able to hold the paintbrush and they painted together 🥰🥰🥰

mums landscape 🙈🙈
 

Attachments

  • 423CD1AA-CDEB-4307-A888-64E9F42F8F6C.jpeg
    423CD1AA-CDEB-4307-A888-64E9F42F8F6C.jpeg
    291.9 KB · Views: 45

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
82,359
0
Kent
My husband’s home provided chair exercises every week and a weekly musical session. It was a small home for 17 residents and a very small number joined in with the music and even smaller joined the chair exercises.

I was there for all the activities and it was often just the teacher and I doing the exercises by ourselves. My husband was happy to watch.

Even though hardly anyone joined I suppose it was still a distraction, something to look at. So much depends on the stages of dementia . The benefits of these activities are probably overrated and more to please the relatives.

Before my husband went into residential care I tried lots of activities with him and it was hard work keeping him interested and that was one to one.
 

SoniaR

Registered User
May 25, 2024
17
0
I can’t believe there are no activities in her care home! My mums care home had activities every morning, as well as special events like singers, a garden party and even Diwali dancing. They had a fabulous Acitivities Co-ordinator who my mum adored. She was a very happy, warm person and I’m sure mum loved her more than me 😂 They did all sorts of activities, sometime even simple things like prepping the veg for lunch. Mum enjoyed that as she loved to cook. Singing was always the favourite. Not everyone joined in but they watched. Afternoons were quieter but that was okay as it gave residents a rest. I wonder if you need to move your sister to somewhere more stimulating? If you are self funding then that’s easy to do, but not sure how easy that is if she is funded by the council. Still worth discussing with SS. Hope all goes well for you.
 

nancymay

Registered User
Oct 12, 2023
15
0
Yes you wonder what those activity co-ordinators are doing?! ! Maybe things are so short staffed they end up doing regular care.
mums home have a team of 3 (53 residents) one FT and two PT and there is something on each morning and afternoon. Often very simple like music or bingo. We get sent a weekly timetable. They also buy a lot in so singers, animals etc.
mum is late stage now so can’t ‘do ‘ much but she enjoys going when she gets the opportunity. I dropped her at art group this week and the lady said mum was able to hold the paintbrush and they painted together 🥰🥰🥰

mums landscape 🙈🙈
What a beautiful painting to treasure , there's nothing like this where my sister is , I'm going have a meeting soon , hopefully things will change thankyou for your reply .
 

nancymay

Registered User
Oct 12, 2023
15
0
My husband’s home provided chair exercises every week and a weekly musical session. It was a small home for 17 residents and a very small number joined in with the music and even smaller joined the chair exercises.

I was there for all the activities and it was often just the teacher and I doing the exercises by ourselves. My husband was happy to watch.

Even though hardly anyone joined I suppose it was still a distraction, something to look at. So much depends on the stages of dementia . The benefits of these activities are probably overrated and more to please the relatives.

Before my husband went into residential care I tried lots of activities with him and it was hard work keeping him interested and that was one to one.
Like you say it's something different for the residents to watch , even if they don't take part , thankyou for your reply .
 

nancymay

Registered User
Oct 12, 2023
15
0
I can’t believe there are no activities in her care home! My mums care home had activities every morning, as well as special events like singers, a garden party and even Diwali dancing. They had a fabulous Acitivities Co-ordinator who my mum adored. She was a very happy, warm person and I’m sure mum loved her more than me 😂 They did all sorts of activities, sometime even simple things like prepping the veg for lunch. Mum enjoyed that as she loved to cook. Singing was always the favourite. Not everyone joined in but they watched. Afternoons were quieter but that was okay as it gave residents a rest. I wonder if you need to move your sister to somewhere more stimulating? If you are self funding then that’s easy to do, but not sure how easy that is if she is funded by the council. Still worth discussing with SS. Hope all goes well for you.
Thankyou , it sounds lovely where your mum is , I just wish we could have the same , hopefully after the meeting things might change .