Dementia sufferer and dog?

et1949

Registered User
Oct 30, 2022
55
0
74
Norfolk
Good afternoon

Some of you may know me already and of our circumstances.

We had a visit from my sister for a week, she went home on Saturday. She brought her little mini Schnauzer this time as she drove rather than taking the train.

My husband who has dementia and has been pretty inactive and uninterested lately, really got on well with the dog. The dog seemed to take to him straight away (I sometimes think dogs know things). He really enjoyed the week and seemed to brighten up and enjoyed having the dog around, she kept following him, mostly because my husband drops food a lot.
Sam kept saying 'that dog really loves me because I drop food', I think some was dropped deliberately.

My question is, do people think it would be good for me to adopt a small dog, Its something I've wanted to do for a while but didn't as we used to travel abroad a lot. We wont be doing that anymore now though.

My only slight reservation is if Sam gets much more 'disabled' will I still be able to cope and will he?

Experience and advice would be really welcomed.

Much love
Eileen
 

Blissy

Registered User
Jan 29, 2023
65
0
Although we haven't ever had a dog of our own my husband does like it when he sees friends dogs. However, I would be very cautious about adopting one at this stage. Sadly in time you will find your husband needs more of your time and to deal with him plus the dog might prove just too much. Dog will need walking and what would you do if time comes when you couldn't go out and leave your husband. Sorry to put a downer on things but I have heard other carers say this.
 

jac69

Registered User
Apr 17, 2023
39
0
Good afternoon

Some of you may know me already and of our circumstances.

We had a visit from my sister for a week, she went home on Saturday. She brought her little mini Schnauzer this time as she drove rather than taking the train.

My husband who has dementia and has been pretty inactive and uninterested lately, really got on well with the dog. The dog seemed to take to him straight away (I sometimes think dogs know things). He really enjoyed the week and seemed to brighten up and enjoyed having the dog around, she kept following him, mostly because my husband drops food a lot.
Sam kept saying 'that dog really loves me because I drop food', I think some was dropped deliberately.

My question is, do people think it would be good for me to adopt a small dog, Its something I've wanted to do for a while but didn't as we used to travel abroad a lot. We wont be doing that anymore now though.

My only slight reservation is if Sam gets much more 'disabled' will I still be able to cope and will he?

Experience and advice would be really welcomed.

Much love
Eileen
I have 3 dogs 2 mini schnauzers and a mini poodle I find they bring me a bit of light relief. They make me smile every day and I can get out in the fresh air and walk them My o/h can walk one of them but not unsupervised in case he gets lost. I tell him he can get lost but not with my dog. Although the dog has an id tag so they would know where both came from lol. If you have a garden and think you could cope with an older rescue dog then go for it. The rescue centres will help you get the right one for your circumstances. I have just helped a 74year old lady with a mobility scooter give a home to an older dog after she lost hers last year. Not the one she asked for but a match made in heaven. Older dogs are often house trained and content to sit at your feet all day they still have a lot of love to give just at a slower pace. I would advise against a pupy or young dog as they are a lot of work
 

et1949

Registered User
Oct 30, 2022
55
0
74
Norfolk
Although we haven't ever had a dog of our own my husband does like it when he sees friends dogs. However, I would be very cautious about adopting one at this stage. Sadly in time you will find your husband needs more of your time and to deal with him plus the dog might prove just too much. Dog will need walking and what would you do if time comes when you couldn't go out and leave your husband. Sorry to put a downer on things but I have heard other carers say this.
Thank you Blissy, I did think this may be a bit ambitious it's just that he was so much more alive with the dog here. It was lovely to see.
My sister said she noticed such a change in him. I said about walking the dog and her answer was to get someone to walk for me if I couldn't when the time comes although a quick walk alone would be good for me to. She used to use a dog walker when she was still working.
Thank you again
It needs a lot of thought.
 

et1949

Registered User
Oct 30, 2022
55
0
74
Norfolk
I have 3 dogs 2 mini schnauzers and a mini poodle I find they bring me a bit of light relief. They make me smile every day and I can get out in the fresh air and walk them My o/h can walk one of them but not unsupervised in case he gets lost. I tell him he can get lost but not with my dog. Although the dog has an id tag so they would know where both came from lol. If you have a garden and think you could cope with an older rescue dog then go for it. The rescue centres will help you get the right one for your circumstances. I have just helped a 74year old lady with a mobility scooter give a home to an older dog after she lost hers last year. Not the one she asked for but a match made in heaven. Older dogs are often house trained and content to sit at your feet all day they still have a lot of love to give just at a slower pace. I would advise against a pupy or young dog as they are a lot of work
Thank you Jac69

I had an older small dog in mind. Husband has his own tracking watch but doesn't go anywhere on his own 😉. He's not very good at walking but I sometimes drive him somewhere that we can have a very short walk.

We do have a garden big enough for a small dog to chase a ball or something.

It was so lovely to see him perk up each morning when the dog rushed to greet him. Very moving.

We get attendance allowance which we could use for a dig walker if necessary but I really need the exercise, and escape, myself at the moment.

I will give it some more thought.

Thanks a lot for the advice.
 

Veritas

Registered User
Jun 15, 2020
305
0
All I will say on this one is that I am now the dog carer as well as caring for my PWD, who is obsessed with the idea that the dog hasn’t been fed and constantly tries to feed him more. In order to protect the dog, I’m spending a lot of my time listening out and intervening when necessary. It is unbelievably annoying and frustrating, and currently I can’t do anything at all without expecting to be interrupted. It doesn’t matter if in the end I’m not interrupted, it is just as distracting.

If you really want a dog for yourself, fair enough, but be aware of the implications.