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Written confirmation of Dementia?

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Rosserk, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    247
    Hi all can I get a document that confirms my mother has dementia? And if so who provides it? And can I use it to support Power of Attorney?
     
  2. Rosettastone57

    Rosettastone57 Registered User

    Oct 27, 2016
    1,031
    I got a letter from the memory clinic stating that my mother-in-law had been diagnosed with mixed dementia, which was the same one sent out to her GP. I'm not sure you need a document for POA. I obtained POA for my mother-in-law way before her diagnosis . The OPG didn't ask for any medical information
     
  3. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
    Are you wondering about when you can use your LPA to handle your mothers financial affairs?
    Generally it's up to you to decide.
    I had a case where an institution asked for a formal COP 3, I ignored this and got a consultant to provide a 'to whom it may concern' statement saying that ' Due to her dementing syndrome Mrs nitram is not capable of fully handling her financial affairs' . They accepted this.

    If the query concerns H&W it's more difficult, blanket statements are not allowed.
     
  4. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    247

    I have power of attorney but it states only when person loses capacity so I wasn’t sure if I needed to prove no capacity? Did you have any problems using the POW? Do I just present it to the bank and so on? I’m worried they’d ask for proof of lost capacity.
     
  5. Rosettastone57

    Rosettastone57 Registered User

    Oct 27, 2016
    1,031
    I didn't have that restriction, so the bank dealt with it easily. I've no experience of your situation, I'm afraid
     
  6. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    247
    Thanks, it’s financial. I am concerned because it says ‘only when person loses capacity’ I mean it’s completely obvious for anyone to see. I have her bank cards but I could do with her statements being sent to me not her. She lives with me and waits for the postman if she gets to him before me she hides the letters! If she sees her bank statements she has no idea about any transactions and drives me insane! No money has gone out of her accounts for months but she’s walking around with a bank statement from 2017 demanding to know where the money went because she thinks it’s this months! She won’t believe me it’s 2019! As soon as I can I will grab the statement but I want to avoid it happening again.
     
  7. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    247
    We did the POA on the Government website and it has two boxes one for joint immediate control and one for only when person loses capacity I didn’t want any control until then.
     
  8. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
    Using your POA ask the bank to address the statements to you.
    This may not be possible or you may get letters addressed to 'you - POA for her'
    One solution is to cancel written statements and rely on online ones, doubt if she will notice lack of statements.
     
  9. Wifenotcarer

    Wifenotcarer Registered User

    Mar 11, 2018
    247
    Central Scotland
    We did our (Scottish) POAs around three years ago when OH was deemed to still have capacity. I had to get a letter from a medical professional this year, confirming that OH no longer has capacity (he scored zero on the cognition test) which had to be attached to the original POA document so that I could begin to act on his behalf. This was needed so that I could sign the papers when he entered a Care Home and to present to the Bank when I split our savings into two equal accounts.
     
  10. Rosettastone57

    Rosettastone57 Registered User

    Oct 27, 2016
    1,031
    I think the opening poster is saying the POA isn't set up with the bank yet ,because of the losing capacity clause
     
  11. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
    Just inform the bank that you want to take sole control
     
  12. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    247
    That’s correct I haven’t set anything up yet. I just want to make sure I do everything right don’t want to go the bank only to be told I need additional documents which I can get before if I need to.

    We have a psychiatrist visiting tomorrow to assess mum she’s had the cognitive test and failed miserably, she’s also had the brain scan which shows damage to frontal lobes. The psychiatrist is the final stage to confirm diagnosis. Apparently all three steps have to be completed before they can confirm. Five minutes with my mum was really all it would take, mum is definitely late stage but had to follow protocol! I’m in no hurry to set up POA mum lives with me so has no bills to pay and doesn’t need any money.
     
  13. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    247
    why is everything so complicated
     
  14. northumbrian_k

    northumbrian_k Registered User

    Mar 2, 2017
    794
    Male
    Newcastle
    I wasn't asked to prove my wife's capacity when I took over her financial affairs at her High Street bank, the one that favours horses. I made an appointment with someone from the team that deals with Power of Attorney. I went armed with a file of papers including the diagnosis letter that she got in 2016 (not in itself proof of lost capacity) and the psychiatrist's report produced for Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards purposes in 2018 (ditto). None of it was looked at.

    My wife was in respite at the time and I was fairly confident that if asked I could demonstrate her inability to handle her own affairs. The very friendly man did not look at the Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) in any detail and certainly did not check to see whether or not it specified that it could be used only when capacity was lost. Once I had proved my ID and handed over the original LPA for copying and immediate return I was made my wife's representative for the 2 accounts that she had at the time. I was given full access, a debit card, internet banking access and telephone banking.

    I hope that this helps.
     
  15. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    8,035
    Yorkshire
    hi @Rosserk
    just be aware that a diagnosis doesn't necessarily mean that the person no longer has capacity ... many retain capacity well after the diagnosis
    so it may be worth checking both issues with the psychiatrist
     
  16. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    19,035
    Male
    North Manchester
    Basically because taking over control of somebody's finances, and maybe H&W decisions is a very serious matter.
    If the LPA says 'only when lacking capacity' institutions have to ascertain that capacity has been lost.
    How they do this is up to them, they have a duty of care to the account holder.
    Best to go in and say in my judgement as LPA the person is now loosing or has lost capacity
     
  17. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    247
    She’s had dementia for three years and only recently lost capacity so I was aware of this. However I strongly believe her judgement has been impaired for the last three years. I don’t think I will have any problem getting evidence to confirm list capacity.
     
  18. jugglingmum

    jugglingmum Registered User

    Jan 5, 2014
    5,180
    Female
    Chester
    My mum has multiple bank accounts and investments (she worked in foreign exchange and therefore liked to spread her risk etc), some statements come addressed to me, with her name only visible somewhere in the statement (annoyingly this is one where I also have an ISA so never know who it belongs to until double checked), some come addressed to me with POA next to my name and mum's name on next line, and some come with mum's name first and then mine.

    I think all bar the investment mentioned everything comes with mum's name clearly visible in the 'window'.

    On line statements may be the way to go once you've sorted the POA out if mum lives with you and grabs the post (no reference to capacity in mum's so can't help on that bit).
     
  19. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    247

    We had to go into her two banks last week to order new cards because she’d cut her old ones up! Both banks witnessed how severe her dementia is going m sure they will remember me. They were both actually very helpful so I guess I’m just being over cautious.
     
  20. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    247

    Thanks I agree online is the way to go.
     

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