1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. johnprem

    johnprem Registered User

    Oct 26, 2015
    2
    Mam was forgetting things enough for me to notice something was wrong
    Since she's been told she has got Alzheimer's,she forgets everything,but remembers to do things for herself or wants me to do something for her but when I want her to do something for me she forgets,even afters numerous reminders
    Is this normal i'm confused.
     
  2. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,829
    UK
    Confusing isn't it!! For my mum, after diagnosis nothing in her behaviour was different, but my way of caring for her went up a notch and I suddenly became aware of the self obsessed nature of the illness. I wanted to do more for mum and she in turn actually asking me to do more. I did cut back on a lot of this and let mum do the things she could still do, mainly little household chores and sometimes I'd even let her make a cup of coffee for me, even though it was very black and very sweet!!! Not like that now though.
     
  3. johnprem

    johnprem Registered User

    Oct 26, 2015
    2
    thanks

    Thank you
    Mam doesn;t do housework or do a decent meal saying or I forgot
    how can you go from doing things one minute then completely nothing within a week of been officially diagnosed. Awful to think but could she be playing on so she has to come to mu house everyday for a meal or me do housework.
     
  4. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,561
    North West
    How do you feel she has reacted to the diagnosis? This could perhaps have some bearing on her current state. Welcome to TP by the way.
     
  5. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,829
    UK
    Good point made, has your mother been able to take on board the diagnosis and now feeling a little insecure because of it?
     
  6. Sue J

    Sue J Registered User

    Dec 9, 2009
    8,042
    Hi Johnprem, welcome to TP. I think Stanleypj is right receiving a diagnosis is devastating even though you may have been living with the disease and its symptoms for some time.

    I have had symptoms for 6 years now and have also cared and still do for people with dementia. Until I had my own symptoms, I can only say I had no idea of what sufferers go through - as an 'onlooker' it seems they go out of their way to upset you, become lazy and want you to do things for them, forget when you ask them things etc. etc. I now know the reality: all energy and mental effort goes in to trying to cope with day to day living whilst struggling with a brain that is constantly misfiring at will is as it seems. Lots of help and support is needed, but not really wanted, thank you, as one struggles to do what the mind has always wanted to do.

    If your Mum was never one to 'play on' things before I'm sure you can safely say she is not doing so now but that the illness is affecting her functioning so much. Some people don't want to talk about their diagnosis but as with any other illness not sharing about such a devastating diagnosis can cause severe depression. Keep posting it will help your understanding.:)

    Best wishes
    Sue
     

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