1. lindaj

    lindaj Registered User

    Jan 15, 2007
    30
    Nottingham
    Mum has been in her home for 2 months now and she totally reliant on others to do everything for her she has moderate dementia and it seems to be well controlled with medication. She is very frail and weighs 5stone what is worrying me is that a lady in the home with Alzheimers is always going in everybodys bedroom and mum has told me that she is very strong and on occasions has hit her, when I have been visiting mum she is always coming into mums bedroom and mum will shout get her out and it is causing me some worry. I have had a word with the staff and they have said they will sort it out but I am not convinced. Has anybody any ideas about what to do I have no reason to disbelieve mum.

    Linda
     
  2. noelphobic

    noelphobic Registered User

    Feb 24, 2006
    3,452
    Liverpool
    I can see how this would be a worry for you. There is a lady in my mum's nh who wanders around and sometimes goes into peoples rooms. However, I don't think she would hurt anyone. Has your mum's home said how they propose to 'sort it out'?

    Brenda
     
  3. lindaj

    lindaj Registered User

    Jan 15, 2007
    30
    Nottingham
    No they haven't when I went at the weekend the manageress what not there so when I go again this week I will have a word with her if she's available!! When I spoke to the care assistant she said oh yes she can be a bit rough with us sometimes, I said well your not frail like mum are you.
     
  4. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    I don't blame you for being worried. You need to speak to the manager and to that end, you chould call before and make an appointment. I think doing that would give them a heads up about how serious you think this is: turning up and hoping someone available to see you might give the wrong message I think.

    Jennifer
     
  5. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,596
    Kent
    Dear Linda, I know how you feel, but have to say my mother was one of those who always went in the rooms of others. I don`t think that can be helped, some with dementia are known as wanderers.

    What is worrying is the violence, or threat of violence, and that it seems to be being taken lightly. I would certainly take issue with the response you got from the care assistant.
     
  6. magill

    magill Registered User

    Apr 10, 2007
    1
    London
    Linda

    I have seen nets used accross doors to deter other Dementia patients from entering a room. I understand they work very well. If they are not used maybe you could suggest to the home.

    Siobhan
     
  7. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Siobhan - what a good idea!
     
  8. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia
    In Mum's home (I think you call it 'assisted care' in UK) she has a key to her room so she can lock herself in. As with motel doors, the person inside is never locked in - they can always get out. It just prevents others from entering her room. Staff have a master key which allows them to enter whenever they need to.

    I realise that it may not be possible for your Mum to manage a key situation - many in Mum's home are beyond this too.

    It is very frightening for elderly people to have even the possibility of attack - when Mum and Dad first moved in to the home they were both scared of other residents whose actions were sometimes violent. Dad was a big man - over 6 foot tall and heavy, but he was scared too. (Dad has since passed away.)

    I hope you can find a solution for your Mum. Nell
     
  9. lindaj

    lindaj Registered User

    Jan 15, 2007
    30
    Nottingham
    thankyou for all your replies I certainly think the net seems a great idea I will certainly bring this up

    Linda
     

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