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Wobbly....

Blodski

Registered User
Sep 3, 2017
47
Conwy
Hello

My mum was diagnosed with Mixed Dementia in March and went into care in July. Since then my Dad (her husband) has died and the care home has said there has been a decline - to be expected I suppose after such a traumatic event.

When I saw her on Boxing Day, she seemed quite wobbly on her feet and had to hold the side of the table to steady herself. I noticed too she was 'shuffling' more.

Is this common in someone with Mixed Dementia, and is it a sign of further decline?

Thanks
 

witts1973

Registered User
Jun 20, 2018
731
Leamington Spa
Hello

My mum was diagnosed with Mixed Dementia in March and went into care in July. Since then my Dad (her husband) has died and the care home has said there has been a decline - to be expected I suppose after such a traumatic event.

When I saw her on Boxing Day, she seemed quite wobbly on her feet and had to hold the side of the table to steady herself. I noticed too she was 'shuffling' more.

Is this common in someone with Mixed Dementia, and is it a sign of further decline?

Thanks
Hi my mum has mixed dementia she became unsteady on her feet and fell over a few times while shopping and then walked with a shuffle at home and wasn't able to leave the house then,after a while she was no longer able to weight bare,that's just my mums experience
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
12,138
South coast
Yes, Im afraid that loss of mobility is a symptom of all types of dementia.
Sometimes it declines quite slowly and sometimes it can go almost overnight. That shuffle is very distinctive.
 

karaokePete

Registered User
Jul 23, 2017
5,433
N Ireland
Dementia is progressive and loss of, or difficulties with, mobility can be common in the later stages.

My wife is in the earlier stages and she is already experiencing falls.

If this has come on suddenly something like an infection may be the culprit so that should be ruled out before progression of the dementia is assumed.
 

Blodski

Registered User
Sep 3, 2017
47
Conwy
Dementia is progressive and loss of, or difficulties with, mobility can be common in the later stages.

My wife is in the earlier stages and she is already experiencing falls.

If this has come on suddenly something like an infection may be the culprit so that should be ruled out before progression of the dementia is assumed.
Thank you. The home says that she is generally more confused - putting layers of clothes on in the wrong order, and bringing down photo frames and then taking them back up, bringing them down, taking them up etc. She also asked me if my Dad was getting better, despite the fact he died in October. We told her at the time that he died, but it's a shock to hear her asking about him as though he is still alive. I just said he was still in hospital and she seemed to accept it.

She also asked me to take her home. The most dreaded words.
 

Jale

Registered User
Jul 9, 2018
440
Water infections knocked my mum off her legs literally so am assuming that the care home has ruled that out. Sadly the shuffling is another side of the awful illness. Mum went from shuffling to not being able to walk after a spell in hospital, despite the best efforts of the physios. For what it's worth I think you have done the right thing by telling your Mum that your Dad is in hospital, and as for the dreaded going home words we told mum initially that she was in a special hospital to get her better - she hasn't asked about going home now for at least a couple of months now. This illness is so very cruel
 

myss

Registered User
Jan 14, 2018
438
Thank you. The home says that she is generally more confused - putting layers of clothes on in the wrong order, and bringing down photo frames and then taking them back up, bringing them down, taking them up etc. She also asked me if my Dad was getting better, despite the fact he died in October. We told her at the time that he died, but it's a shock to hear her asking about him as though he is still alive. I just said he was still in hospital and she seemed to accept it.

She also asked me to take her home. The most dreaded words.
Hello @Blodski My dad has dementia, not mixed dementia, but for what it's worth, he has the same symptoms as described. With regards to the photo frames, not only does he take them up to his room and down but he sometimes takes off the part that the frame leans on to hold it up.
 

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