1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. atsc02725

    atsc02725 Registered User

    Oct 19, 2005
    1
    Midlothian Scotland
    My wife Catherine (Kitty) is in a very advanced stage of the Alzheimer's illness, and for the last eleven months has been totally confined to a wheelchair or a comfy seat during her waking hours. In recent weeks she has appeared to be more responsive when I speak to her or make comments about life and the surroundings. When I reach out to her, she attempts to move forward. I feel that with a little encouragement and support, she would attempt to stand.
    The care home has an arrangement with a Physiotherapist, whereby he attends the home twice a week, to treat those residents requiring his help. I have spoken to him about Kitty, and he agreed to see her. Afterwards, we had a discussion about what was possible in Kitty's case. We agreed that our expectation should not be high, but felt that it was worth a try. We decided on weekly sessions, and have had two already, the results are not startling, but we are sufficiently encouraged to continue with enthusiasm.
    What I am wondering is, has any one else attempted this type of thing at this late stage of Alzheimer’s?
     
  2. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    It would not be possible to do this for my wife Jan, but I keep trying anything that might give her a sense of achievement, a hint that not everything has gone.

    I would say do whatever you can, try anything at all that might encourage her to do what she may be able to do. If it doesn't work, you have lost nothing.

    If it works, rejoice, at least for a while.

    Small victories mean a lot!
     
  3. Robert

    Robert Registered User

    Feb 25, 2005
    44
    My wife who has Alzheimers, spent 2 weeks in a hospital bed, which resulted in her loseing the ability to walk. Then 2 months after moving to a care home, she walked spontaneously for a period of around 2-3 weeks, but after encountering pressure sores followed by bed rest she could not walk again. Now 7 months later, having failed to get any help on the NHS front, my wife saw a private Physiotherapist yesterday for assessment. I'll post any progress.
     

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