1. Q&A: Looking after yourself as a carer - Friday 25 January, 3-4pm

    As a carer for a person living with dementia, the needs of that person will often come before your own, and this can mean that you don't always look after yourself.

    However, it's important for both you and the person you care for. But how do you do that properly?

    Our next expert Q&A will be on looking after yourself as a carer. It will be hosted by Angelo from our Knowledge Services team, who focuses on wellbeing. He'll be answering your questions on Friday 25 January between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

When to move my Mum

Discussion in 'Welcome and how to use Talking Point' started by Gardenersworld, May 18, 2018.

  1. Gardenersworld

    Gardenersworld New member

    May 18, 2018
    1
    my Father has just died, leaving my mum who was diagnosed early on set Alzheimer’s last year. The doctor says she could stay at home with carers but I live abroad so my brother does most of the visiting and wants her to move closer to him. Any advice about whether to move her now or later? I fear more stress could initiate a further decline to that which we have seen over the last 6 months?
     
  2. Jessbow

    Jessbow Registered User

    Does she need to come to terms with your fathers death perhaps first? Does she understand that he has died? ( My late mother was convinced my father had gone off with another woman, despite having attended his funeral)

    In the bigger picture, she probably is better nearer your brother BUT will it then cut her off from everything and everyone she know? We kept Mum at home as long as we could, but all her neighbours looked out for her, and when she did go walk abouts they would usually intercept as they had known her years
     
  3. karaokePete

    karaokePete Volunteer Host

    Jul 23, 2017
    3,871
    Male
    Hello and welcome to TP, I hope you find support here.

    Moving someone with dementia is a hard thing to call for the reasons already outlined by Jessbow. Causing confusion by way of the loss of what is familiar can cause problems. I would hope that members with experience of this scenario will see your post and be able to advise how it turned out for them.
    In relation to the death of you father I offer my condolences and enclose a link to an AS Factsheet which deals with grief in general, including the issues for a person with dementia. I hope it is of use to you.
    https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/sites...oads/factsheet_grief_loss_and_bereavement.pdf
     

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