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What to do after death....

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Ladywriter1968

Registered User
Oct 2, 2009
437
0
London UK
Very helpful information

What to do after a death in England & Wales
Ref: D49 April 2006

This is a book/leaflet you can get from any CAB (Citizens Advice Bureau). It has loads of useful information including details on the things you must do.

For example - in the first five days you must:

  • Notify the family doctor
  • Register the death at the register office
  • Contact a funer director
  • Advise the DWP
  • Complete form BD8 - this stops any benefits

Here is a link to a PDF version for the computer savey.
http://www.dwp.gov.uk/publications/dwp/2006/d49_april06.pdf

Moderator note: this page link is now broken. A chase-through leads to
http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Governmentcitizensandrights/Death/WhatToDoAfterADeath/index.htm



Hope this helps
Craig

It is very useful and has a lot of information on benefit that the bereaved may claim.

Very helpful information to know, thanks.

D
 

Ladywriter1968

Registered User
Oct 2, 2009
437
0
London UK
got one question

I think this is really good and helpful advice and I am going to write this down. As when you have never dealt with it, no one comes and tells you what you should do, do they really, and you are mostly left to get on with it. At least I now have an idea for when my dads time comes.

If the person is not insured for enough, who do you contact to help out with the money? is it the LA? DSS? or what? To claim for funeral expenses if you cant afford the funeral?
 

Ladywriter1968

Registered User
Oct 2, 2009
437
0
London UK
this really is not fair on you

Another thing for people to be aware of is the DWP (Department for Work and Pensions).
Back in 2003 I filled in all the forms for pension credit on behalf of Mum as the forms were too complicated for her and listed all her savings and assets with the result that she was entitled to pension credit.
When she was taken ill and moved in with me February 2007 I informed the DWP of the situation and they advised me that everything was ok and the pension credit would still continue.
When she died however I received a form from them stating that I had to declare all her assets and savings(peps,government bonds,properties here and abroad,private pensions,tessas, bank and building society accounts - the list was horrendous). I duly filled in this form and sent it back to them and I have now received a reply saying that they have overpaid mum and they are working it out by how much. In the meantime, I am not allowed to distribute any of the estate (I am the named executor) as, obviously, the overpayment has to come out of this estate.
WHY, when I filled in all the original forms correctly (which was again reviewed in 2005 with the same result) have they now decided that as Mum has passed away they have been overpaying her? Needless to say, I am still waiting for the letter stating the overpayment amount.
It may not be much, I don't know, but it really is something I could do without especially when I'm still trying to get over Mum not being here any more.
These things really are sent to try us!!
Love Liz xx
This is not fair on you, you did everything right on your part, I think its their negligence and they are making you suffer now.
 

Ladywriter1968

Registered User
Oct 2, 2009
437
0
London UK
pretty poor service

What wonderful advice and a great help to everyone.

I could do with some advice, on how to rebuild my confidence after having been bullied and hounded for eighteen months by a social worker? The woman made life a misery and towards the end to avoid her I had to turn the answer machine off and not answer the telephone.

I always thought social workers were there to help people but this one broke the mould, thankfully after my mother passed away I had no further contact with the woman but I feel that her constant nagging and bully boy tactics have completely broken me.
I think the social worker should be struck off if thats how she is treating people. You needed her help not her bullying. If you want to persue this I wonder if you could contact her office where she works and put in a complaint about her to her manager and say that you will persue this if nothing gets resolved that you dont want others to suffer like you did. Or you could just move on now and forget about it all.

The choice is yours. Hope this helped. The social worker I had backed down to me in the end about my dad, but only cause I guess I am a very strong person. When my dad was sick she wanted to just send him home again with another care package as before, the previous one did not work.

I had lots of help and advice from people on here as well which helped. In fact the people on here cared more about what was going on with my dad then my own relatives to be honest. They always all sat back and let me get on with it all basically.

I told the SW I could not cope and dug my heals in at her. I said if you send him home and anything else happens I will hold you personally responsible and my Brother Inlaw works for a top lawyers in London so I will have no problem getting legal representation on this. Cause you are duty bound to him and his care. I will have you for neglect etc. But he only got into that home because of that stuff I said.

None of dads family showed up for the meetings, it was just me fighting alone, and the doctor agreed with me and nurse to. and when my husband could get time off work he came to support me. Even when uncle did come to one meeting he sat their like a stuffed toy anyway.

But this is just an example of how strong you have to be sometimes regardless of how you are feeling. Not everyone can be like this I agree. But sometimes when you get **** in life, you suddenly think, thats it, enough is enough. I am not putting up with this **** anymore and fob offs from services.
 

lesmisralbles

Account Closed
Nov 23, 2007
5,543
0
I understand all your problems

I should write a book, I shall call it IDIOTS, the DWAP, Gas board, TV, Telephone, council tax, all of them. The list is endless.

A solicitor is good,, if you can afford one:(
But, there are things you can do on your own.

I will post again, when I have sorted out all our stuff XX

Barb X
 

Ladywriter1968

Registered User
Oct 2, 2009
437
0
London UK
what a great ida

Hi All,

I'm starting a thread here to help with the practical issues of dealing with a loss/death. I was completely losts when mum died, not just emotionally but practically.

I'm going to start off by adding a few useful documents and books that I have used to get through all the practical issues. I'm not going to go into too much detail, just point to some really useful resources. I'll add to this over the next couple of days.

It has also been my first probate to deal with and I have learnt a lot a long the way. Please add any useful resources that you know of, and as time goes on I will try to summarise it all in another closed thread and perhaps make it a sticky.

Kind Regards
Craig
I think I have replied before here but my excuse at moment is, I am not well, I think this is a great idea.
 

Ladywriter1968

Registered User
Oct 2, 2009
437
0
London UK

Ladywriter1968

Registered User
Oct 2, 2009
437
0
London UK
what is the site for the army funeral allowance?

Does anyone know the name of the site for the army funeral allowance, I had this before but I lost the contact details? I just wanted this for future reference really.
 

CraigC

Registered User
Mar 21, 2003
6,631
0
London
What happens to an EPA if someone dies?

If the Donor dies the EPA automatically comes to an end. The Attorney should send the original EPA and the death certificate to the OPG as soon as possible. The OPG cannot provide advice about how to deal with the Donor’s estate; this is a matter for a solicitor, District Probate Registry or other professional advisor.

There is more information on EPA's in the guide on the Public Guardianship website here:

http://www.publicguardian.gov.uk/docs/epa101-0409.pdf

Kind Regards
Craig
 

gilly96

Registered User
Apr 29, 2010
6
0
West Sussex
What to do after death

I was EPA with my husband for my father and he lived with us and we looked after him without any help washing etc. My father died last february and my brother who is an executor along with dad's solicitors are handling probate (well the solicitors are as my brother is too busy he says) but my brother had no contact along with my other brother and sister with my father and still does not with us. I found out from the solicitors that the will was changed 7 weeks after my mum's death and 5 weeks after her funeral. It was a shock it now gives my brothers more money. My father had alzheimers at the time and when he moved in with us nearly 4 years ago he had advanced alzheimers. He was in a terrible state after mum died and it is obvious that he was pressured into changing his will. He was on sleeping tablets diazepan, he could not eat and could not keep still. I cannot afford to fight this and the way they bahaved has caused my blood pressure to rise dangerously high and the doctor wants me to calm down. But I do need to know the state of things with probate and would like to know what to ask solicitors (they are the ones that changed dad's will by the way) I need to know what to write as I feel very worried about what else is going on behind my back. Please can anyone help me.
 

CraigC

Registered User
Mar 21, 2003
6,631
0
London
Was the EPA registered?

Hi Gilly,

Firstly

I found out from the solicitors that the will was changed 7 weeks after my mum's death and 5 weeks after her funeral.

Sorry just to confirm. Are you saying that you dad's will was changed soon after your mother died but after your dad's EPA was registered? The EPA is usually registered as soon as you have reason to believe the person is losing the mental capacity to manage their affairs.

There are people better experienced to answer this, but my impression is that it is difficult to change a will after the EPA has been registered? Can someone confirm this or tell gilly if this may have been possible? I'd hate to give you incorrect information and have no direct experience of an issue like this.

My advice would be to phone the alzheimers help line. They cannot offer detailed legal advice but can give you accurate details on the law and put you in the right direction.

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/helpline

Kind Regards
Craig
 

Ladywriter1968

Registered User
Oct 2, 2009
437
0
London UK
how do you do that

We were advised to purchase pre-paid funeral plans.
It made life much easier,one telephone call,a visit to our nominated undertaker and all was settled.
There was also a geat saving on cost,the original charges much less than todays.

Norman
How do you go about pre-purchasing funeral payments?
 

knitone

Registered User
Nov 22, 2010
29
0
We were advised to purchase pre-paid funeral plans.
It made life much easier,one telephone call,a visit to our nominated undertaker and all was settled.
There was also a geat saving on cost,the original charges much less than todays.

Norman

I hadn't thought of that, Norman. Sounds like a good idea. I'll see if my sister will go along with it.
 

CraigC

Registered User
Mar 21, 2003
6,631
0
London
Hi knitone,

Coincidently, I've been looking into prepaid funeral plans and am getting things in place. You may find this useful. You need to ask the right question whichever funeral play provider you use:

http://www.which.co.uk/money/insurance/reviews-ns/funeral-plans/the-costs-of-funeral-plans/

http://www.which.co.uk/money/insurance/reviews-ns/funeral-plans/how-secure-are-funeral-plans/

Questions you should ask a potential provider include:

What happens if your chosen funeral director goes out of business?

What happens if the person the funeral is intended for dies abroad?

What happens if there are outstanding payments at death?

I'll see if my sister will go along with it.

There is a another very important reason to sort out a funeral plan if you have a relative who is self-funded. You sell up the house to pay for care, use up savings, then when the money runs out the Local Authority will help with cost of care. However, they will not help with funeral cost.

Sorting out a prepaid funeral plan early means the money can be used from the savings/house sale - if self-funded it is easier to do this before you approach the local authority and tell them the money is soon to run out.

Hope this helps
Craig
 

noelphobic

Registered User
Feb 24, 2006
3,452
0
Liverpool
another very important reason to sort out a funeral plan if you have a relative who is self-funded. You sell up the house to pay for care, use up savings, then when the money runs out the Local Authority will help with cost of care. However, they will not help with funeral cost.

Sorting out a prepaid funeral plan early means the money can be used from the savings/house sale - if self-funded it is easier to do this before you approach the local authority and tell them the money is soon to run out.

Hope this helps
Craig

You would normally approach the LA before all the money had ran out though - when it was around the 23k mark when it goes on a sliding scale. Although I suppose if it seems likely you will get to that point then it might make sense to pre-pay as it would presumably not be considered as Deprivation of Assets.
 

CraigC

Registered User
Mar 21, 2003
6,631
0
London
as it would presumably not be considered as Deprivation of Assets. Reply With Quote
I'm pretty sure that I'm safe on this decision, but more than happy to see them in court on this one :rolleyes:

It is right that you should approach the LA well before the assets fall below 23K. As always, make sure you get professional advice.
 
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