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What stage of Alzheimer's?

  1. I don't want to think about this

    14 vote(s)
    4.0%
  2. Stage 1

    14 vote(s)
    4.0%
  3. Stage 2

    6 vote(s)
    1.7%
  4. Stage 3

    22 vote(s)
    6.3%
  5. Stage 4

    50 vote(s)
    14.2%
  6. Stage 5

    86 vote(s)
    24.4%
  7. Stage 6

    108 vote(s)
    30.7%
  8. Stage 7

    52 vote(s)
    14.8%
  1. Deexox

    Deexox Registered User

    Jul 28, 2008
    14
    I voted for stage 6 but in reality my granda is a lot worse than stage 6 but not as bad as stage 7 but then again the stages are just guidelines.

    Dee xoxox
     
  2. margaret101

    margaret101 Registered User

    Jul 17, 2008
    56
    clacton on sea
    what stage

    I voted 5 then read the list now i think I should vote 7 that came as a big shock....................

    marg x
     
  3. karis532003

    karis532003 Registered User

    Sep 28, 2008
    3
    London
    What stage

    Looking at the criteria Mum seems to fit in with stage 7 but for one significant difference, i.e. she is very coherent and makes her wishes known in no uncertain terms and she still has her sense of humour (when told something would be here shortly she replied 'so is Christmas'). Has anyone else found the same?
     
  4. kj8uk

    kj8uk Registered User

    Dec 8, 2008
    5
    Kent UK
    Stages

    I have been reading the responses to the 7 stages, and would just like to say that in my experience so far (parent diagnosed 2 years ago) you can have symptoms across several 'stages' all at the same time. My Mum doesn't 'fit' a stage at all, so the list doesn't help in our case. She would be 3 and 4 and 5 in parts!
     
  5. CraigC

    CraigC Registered User

    Mar 21, 2003
    6,630
    London
    Hi Kj8uk,

    I think you have picked up on a good point and many would agree. Many have commented on this thread how stages overlap - mobility can go at different stages, mediciation can affect stages. I would only use it as a guide and frankly my father seems to have had about 20 stages. So I think your statement is a good reminder.

    Kind Regards
    Craig
     
  6. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Speaking not as an expert, I think the development of dementia is really a continuum. There are no absolute pigeonholes.

    When people use methods to identify what they consider stages, they may use a fine filter and identify many, or a coarse filter - and only see a small number.

    We try to identify major steps within the continuum but necessarily that will be artificial, and different for each person, and different according to the dementia - or dementias as there is also mixed dementia - involved.

    As Craig says, it is just a guide.....:)
     
  7. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,337
    Kent
    The above describes my husband to at `T`. The seven stages overlap too much and can be very confusing, but in our case, there is nothing confusing about the above.
     
  8. julieann15

    julieann15 Registered User

    Jun 13, 2008
    2,012
    Leicestershire
    I think mum is in the middle stage as it sums her up to a "T"- her whole life is double checking and then checking again absolutely everything- the disease is winning mum is not.she recently scored reasonably highly on the memory test 25 i think but I noticed that as we left to go she looked at the calendar clock and read out the day, date and month.

    Julie x
     
  9. penguin629

    penguin629 Registered User

    Nov 9, 2008
    54
    Shropshire
    Hello

    Is this poll to see which stage our loved ones are in according to the 7 stages of dementia?

    Then I'd put my Dad in stage 5 to 6. Sadly. He never really had problems with his memory initially. We first knew there was something wrong when he'd put wine glasses upside down. His perception of everyday objects is rubbish now. He can't see real things that are there but can see steps that aren't there and is forever picking invisible things up off the floor.

    He always seems to know my name (I'm proud that he remembers me!) and my mum's but does get us mixed up but we say that's ok as both our names start with J.

    I dread stage 7. Hope he doesn't live to see it.

    Joanne
     
  10. icare2

    icare2 Registered User

    Jun 18, 2006
    84
    scotland
    #110 icare2, Jan 5, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2009
    stages,im bewidered!!

    my wife was 54 when diagnosed,thats now 9 years ago,even at that early stage,she had lost all her cognitive powers,and needed all her personal needs done for her,like eating,cleaning,dressing,etc etc.,

    we were advised even then that her needs would be bettered cared for in a care home.

    But as long as I was fit to look after her,due to the fantastic help of my daughter,we still have her at home now..

    I can honestly say we have been through most of the stages.

    3 years ago she turned extremely violent,thankfully mostly just verbal,also wandering all about the house at all times of night and day,so we asked her consultant if there was anything we can help for this,he prescribed her an anti-physcotic drug,the first few weeks was great,but then she turned completly Zombie like,and I took the option I would rather see her back to aggresiive ways than that,to cut a long story short,she has calmed down now,and we still have her at home,she still needs 24/7 care,
    but thankfully she is still here,has a few bad days and some good ones,and doing fine, but this is only my own observations on this illness,my wife is actually behaving better now than she was a few years ago,
    so I cannot understand this actual stages of ths illness,nor I do not think any of the so called consultants in this field can either can,
    thats why I am bewidered!! with this poll in here,as everyone is so different on there own ways of having the illness,and the consultants dealing with it!!
     
  11. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    I've been looking at the five stage model of the development of dementia and trying to relate it to our experience.

    stages.jpg

    Everyone's journey is different of course, and what I've done isn't scientific, but I hadn't realised how quickly we had rattled through stages 2 and 3 until I compared the poster shown in http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/talkingpoint/discuss/showpost.php?p=122347&postcount=1 and that can be seen in detail at the web site I gave in that post.

    It is all very subjective and I'm still mulling over it
     
  12. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Bruce Interesting thought.

    Cannot reproduce your graph but:

    1995..................2002.......2004/5........2008.....2009?

    These are our corresponding years.
     
  13. ZoeW

    ZoeW Registered User

    Jan 13, 2009
    2
    Tamworth
    My mom is at stage 7. The disease has been rapid through the earlier stages. Mom is 74 now and we were told that this was young to have the disease and its progress therefore is more rapid. At the moment she has been in stage 7 as the longest stage. The definition for stage 7 is true for mom. She can't speak much, can't walk, is doubly incontinent, sleeps a lot, can't feed or drink herself.
     
  14. DianeB

    DianeB Registered User

    May 29, 2008
    765
    nottinghamshire
    My Mum has now entered stage 6, double incontinent, hardly speaks, the walking is now disappearing fast. She can still eat and drink although at times she refuses. She is now starting to try and refuse her meds but the nurse at the home has good repor with her and usually manages to get Mum to take them. Mum has not got the ability to say what she needs or what is worrying her. She can't dress herself wash or even brush her own hair. Sleeps most of the time. My Mum is declining fast and each new day we notice something else.
     
  15. kelli

    kelli Registered User

    Jan 22, 2009
    3
    STAGE 7 instantly

    Hi all, it seems my dad hit stage 7 instanly! 6 weeks ago. He woke one morning and life had changed for him and us. He has been in hospital now for 3 weeks and it has been a very quick decline.They say he needs 24hr care in a nursing home now, but i want him to end his days at home.....is that for my benefit or his?????. He was never 1 for being away from his beloved home, so i think its for his sake as well as mine. I will be the 1 main carer with the help of 2 carers x 4 times a day, with a hospital bed,hoist and all the equipment needed etc.Poor dad, lost his youngest son just over 2 yrs ago, then 7 months later his wife after she lost her leg due to a rare cancer which also resulted in MRSA.....oh god it was a catalouge of events......we wonder if it was all this that took him to AD???? who knows!
     
  16. KatsWhiskers

    KatsWhiskers Registered User

    Feb 8, 2007
    153
    Ramsgate - Kent
    iCare2

    "she turned extremely violent,thankfully mostly just verbal,also wandering all about the house at all times of night and day,so we asked her consultant if there was anything we can help for this,he prescribed her an anti-physcotic drug,the first few weeks was great,but then she turned completly Zombie like"

    I can equate to that except that Mum became physically violent as well. It was advised that I stop giving her the Amilsulpride (antio-psychotic) as it was effecting her heart rate.

    Gosh this sure is a dreadful disease and so cruel.

    I send a hug.

    Mary
     
  17. Bookworm

    Bookworm Registered User

    Jan 30, 2009
    2,581
    Co. Derry
    still contemplating stages

    My husband first showed signs of going very quiet - mute really - about 3 years ago - my sister pointed it out - I'd been trying to put it down to him taking on too much research (though he is 70 now & retired since 55). I'm nearly 16 years younger and thought some of our difficulties were about me not understanding the ageing process - yet in my caring role i meet many aged 85 who are more cognitively competant than my husband is. Peter (my husband) has really superior intelligence - a Cambridge graduate & has PhD & is world famous for what he does. But while he still has many competencies in his hobbies and research interests - home life is such a mess the best of the day is the occasional laugh but more usually strife trying to ensure we are all clear about the next 20 minutes or so and the priorities of the day - when i meet the person who invented post-its I'm going to feel like kicking them in the shins - we've given up on the real ones, even the coloured & different shaped ones - post-its have become 3 dimensional - e.g. Peter puts something in his shoes if it has to go to the car.......

    So - keeping on thread - the stage thing had been bothering me until i saw this really helpful thread full of resources. The Mini mental Score is known to be useless in early stages with very bright people so he passed this - so i was asked to collate a list of things going wrong - I've done this & it would make you weep that someone can conduct an amateur orchestra yet not be sure when Christmas day is on 23rd December.

    I think he is at stage 4 - not entirely but it does fit - I heard a consultant - i think from Southampton which is apparently the best postcode to be in as he treats AD very agressively & does not withhold Aricept in early stages - say "there is nothing mild about mild Dementia" - I so agree with this. I have more to say on this - but already this is a very long post so i'll stop there. Thanks for reading
     
  18. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Thank you for sharing your story, and giving us some background information on you and your dear husband. For me, very interesting reading, as no too stories are ever alike.

    I do hope that you will find TP a source of comfort and information. Welcome.
     
  19. Bookworm

    Bookworm Registered User

    Jan 30, 2009
    2,581
    Co. Derry
    Thankyou Connie - I won't "go on" here as it would go "off thread" - but while I'm sure TP will bring comfort & information - the thing I need, & miss, most is communication (& I'm absolutely sure from browsing round here that communication is at the heart of TP):)
     
  20. Harryboy

    Harryboy Registered User

    Jan 11, 2010
    2
    London
    Multi-infarct dementia -- how long?

    Dr Reisberg's stages are a helpful indicator of the route one will probably follow - perhaps they should be given more prominence on the website. Fortunately for me I was diagnosed at any early stage following deep and prolonged depression - I was given an MRI scan and the brain damage was detected. I only consider myself to be at stage 2. An early indicator for me that something was wrong was an occasion when I could not remember my brother's surname (with whom I am in frequent touch); after racking my brains for some time I realised his surname must be the same as mine! (LOL). Now I have been diagnosed it would be interesting to know what are the average times between these stages. How long have I got before I can no longer organise my life without help?
     

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