What should we be looking for? [on hospital discharge]

Discussion in 'Middle - later stages of dementia' started by chrisdee, Jan 26, 2015.

  1. chrisdee

    chrisdee Registered User

    Nov 23, 2014
    171
    Yorkshire
    Mum's hip is now mended after a fall. Unfortunately, she cannot mobilze using a walking frame, partly as she cannot remember instructions. Like part of the previous thread, she cannot now go back to pleasant care home where we had just got her settled, she can only walk supported by two people. So now needs nursing care, but we want her to walk again if at all possible, 2 weeks ago she was dancing! Knowledge creeps up on you doesn't it? I can see how people have continuous falls - they forget. Is there any hope for her? I feel so sorry for her just now. Been in hospital 9 days, aged 91.
     
  2. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,571
    Female
    Dundee
  3. Navara

    Navara Registered User

    Nov 30, 2012
    181
    Very useful article and has answered my queries under my post on bed blocking.
     
  4. notsogooddtr

    notsogooddtr Registered User

    Jul 2, 2011
    834
    I'm not sure being unable to walk means nursing care,my mother is completely unable to weight bear or even change position in bed/chair.She needs 2 carers for all transfers which are done using a hoist,also 2 carers for position changing every 2 hours day and night.The critical thing is that none of this care needs medically qualified staff thetfore she doesn't qualify for funding for a nursing bed although it is anticipated that she will do quite soon.She is currently on bed rest on the orders of district nurse as she is having probs with pressure areas.
     
  5. Navara

    Navara Registered User

    Nov 30, 2012
    181
    Presumably your mother is already in a care home with nursing so that she will not have to move if/when she does qualify for nursing care? What will make the difference?
     
  6. Pickles53

    Pickles53 Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    2,482
    Radcliffe on Trent
    This exactly describes how my mother was in her last few months of life and she was able to remain in her care home until she died. It was a specialist dementia home but residential not nursing. The District Nurses dealt with any specific nursing issues and there was very good liaison between them and care home staff. It was a great relief that we did not have to find another place foe mum when she was already so frail.
     
  7. Navara

    Navara Registered User

    Nov 30, 2012
    181
    There used to be clear demarcation between residential care homes and nursing homes. These days its pot luck. You may get a residential home where they're prepared to put in the extra care needed for someone who becomes unable to mobilise - or they may simply refuse. There doesn't appear to be any set standard so its very difficult for anyone when they first go to choose a care home as no-one knows what's around the corner.

    With hindsight I would always advise anyone to look for a specialist dementia home. They should be well aware that in the final stages of dementia a person can simply forget how to mobilise.
     
  8. chrisdee

    chrisdee Registered User

    Nov 23, 2014
    171
    Yorkshire
    Thank you Navarra. Our problem is that Mum's home is smallish and residential. We know manager quite well. they will not accept her back as cannot meet these needs for mobilisation. Mum is quite a toughie in some ways and does have 'sensible' moments. Today she said 'I wonder how I am going to get out of here?' and in the next breath she asked if I could take her with me on my [non-existent] forthcoming cruise. My brother is single and she credits him with having many children! I'm dreading moving her - again! - this area is semi-rural so suitable places could involve distance. Another dread.
     
  9. notsogooddtr

    notsogooddtr Registered User

    Jul 2, 2011
    834
    The home my mum is in has dual registration so she should in theory be able to stay if and when her needs change.I take nothing for granted though
     

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