what should I know before an emergency safeguarding assesment for mum and dad

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by tattytwee, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. tattytwee

    tattytwee Registered User

    Jun 10, 2019
    22
    At last we have persuaded dad 84 who is caring for mum 84 with dementia to get some help until now he has refused all offers of help. Now he's reached breaking point and can not cope any longer without getting her into some respite care, mum is becoming very aggressive and she totally refuses to be washed or changed, she is incapable of doing anything for herself, he does everything for her, we have an emergency assessment tomorrow for both mums needs and dad as carer his needs, what should I expect and what should I be prepared for, ive no idea what is
    involved and what could happen can anyone give me any advice, ive searched around online but can't seem to find anything much about what the assessment is exactly.
     
  2. Izzy

    Izzy Volunteer Moderator

    Aug 31, 2003
    59,907
    Female
    Dundee
  3. Ohso

    Ohso Registered User

    Jan 4, 2018
    167
    My advice it to say it as it is, dont sugar coat anything and dont indicate that you are able/willing to help with anything.
    If you do the beginning its much easier than trying to 'upgrade' later.
     
  4. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,779
    Female
    South coast
    Before anyone goes into respite they have to be assessed to see what their needs are so that they can stay somewhere that will provide for those needs.

    They are also looking to see how your dad is coping in order to show that he isnt and the respite needs to happen urgently. I agree with @Ohso - dont play down the problems and dont say that you will be doing things.
     
  5. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,742
    Female
    London
    There is a difference between a needs and carers assessment and a safeguarding one - which is it?

    If the former, detail her behaviour, what she can and can't do and what she and dad need help with. Be very clear what you want the outcome to be - carers, befrienders, day centre, respite, care home or a combination of these? Don't go into finances, that should come later.
     
  6. tattytwee

    tattytwee Registered User

    Jun 10, 2019
    22

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