Wellbeing discussion - checking in with each other during the latest national lockdown

SophieD

Administrator
Staff member
Mar 21, 2018
3,543
0
London
Hi everyone,

A national lockdown was recently announced, with restrictions in place across each of the four nations in the UK and elsewhere across the world. Despite the vaccine at the end of the tunnel, many of you may be going through lots of emotions. It's absolutely ok to feel fed up, anxious, uncertain and anything else you might be feeling. You might also be feeling no different to before, and that's ok too.

We wanted to take the opportunity to check in with all our members - old and new - to ask, how are you?

We know that this is a difficult time for many of you. Please use this space to ask and answer questions about wellbeing, share practical advice with others, and let us know how you're looking after yourselves and staying connected.

If you need to speak to someone, please call our support line on 0333 150 3456.
(If you speak Welsh, you can call our Welsh-speaking support line on 03300 947 400.)

Our support line is open:
Monday – Wednesday 9am – 8pm
Thursday – Friday: 9am – 5pm
Weekends: 10am – 4pm.

We also have the Tea Room, which is a light-hearted corner of the community where you can relax and unwind if you need to: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/forums/tea-room.44/
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
8,232
0
Bristol
We were tested yesterday. I think the housing association in house care team were planning routine testing anyway, but a resident has tested positive so that made it rather more urgent. Amazingly, C who has insisted she is immune took the awful intrusive test in her stride with a bit of reassurance and prompting from the care manager.
All the stress nearly caused a facebook row with my friend when I was a little overly robust in one or two posts, but it all blew over pleasantly. Without her and a couple of other good friends to walk and chat with over the past few months life would be so much harder.
I hope everyone is managing ok in these trying circumstances.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
6,253
0
Southampton
my husband is now shielding again and with me confined to the house, its hard with both of us not able to go outside. the one thing i miss is having the papers. he used to walk to the local shop each day to get them, now he cant go. rather have him safe though. my son will have to top our meters up.
 

lushr

Registered User
Sep 25, 2020
147
0
i’m from another country and we went into full lockdown in May and only came out of it in December. (and now were about to go back in again)

all i can say to you is to be gentle with yourself. lower your expectations of yourself and others. you are all dealing with some kind of change and it is going to have impact at some point.

one of the best things we were shared working from home was a quote from somewhere that pointed out we were not “working from home”, we were trying to work in a non ideal environment under conditions out of our control with implications on all aspects of our lives that we had no way of predicting. that is not the same as “working from home”.

this obviously applies to carers, as well as general family relationships. and the effect of isolation on the elderly as well as ourselves if we are single.

i had “go slow” days. where i knew i wasn’t up to the usual routine, and so as if on a union strike i simply gave myself the time to do everything slowly. it really helped me through some of the bad days.

my new motto for january 2021 is “gently, gently” we all have hopes. for this year being better but for now, just taking care of each other and surviving, and finding any little ways to find a moments joy are going to be key.

watch the birds out the window.

make lime green jelly as if you were a kid again....

add cute puppies to your instagram feed.

whatever lifts your spirits.
 

AliceA

Registered User
May 27, 2016
2,878
0
i’m from another country and we went into full lockdown in May and only came out of it in December. (and now were about to go back in again)

all i can say to you is to be gentle with yourself. lower your expectations of yourself and others. you are all dealing with some kind of change and it is going to have impact at some point.

one of the best things we were shared working from home was a quote from somewhere that pointed out we were not “working from home”, we were trying to work in a non ideal environment under conditions out of our control with implications on all aspects of our lives that we had no way of predicting. that is not the same as “working from home”.

this obviously applies to carers, as well as general family relationships. and the effect of isolation on the elderly as well as ourselves if we are single.

i had “go slow” days. where i knew i wasn’t up to the usual routine, and so as if on a union strike i simply gave myself the time to do everything slowly. it really helped me through some of the bad days.

my new motto for january 2021 is “gently, gently” we all have hopes. for this year being better but for now, just taking care of each other and surviving, and finding any little ways to find a moments joy are going to be key.

watch the birds out the window.

make lime green jelly as if you were a kid again....

add cute puppies to your instagram feed.

whatever lifts your spirits.
Well said, I was too busy in the first lock down, not altogether unavoidable.
now I have ditched the news to the radio new once a day at lunchtime.
I filter it for news I can affect and that out of my influence.
I am having a very slow day, almost in reverse!
no doubt I will catch up another day, in fact some things may have solved their self!
I am constantly “reviewing the situation“ less really is more!
 

lushr

Registered User
Sep 25, 2020
147
0
yes “locus of control” is something we rarely slow down enough to understand. there are things in your control. and things which aren’t. if 2020 taught. e anything it was.... if you’re not coping, go slower! do less! jigsaw puzzles let me switch off from emotions, quite meditative..... doesn’t work for everyone though.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
8,232
0
Bristol
More fun and games with the vaccine. There was a wee mix up with the surgery and it turns out C is getting the vaccine, but at home on an unspecified date. It rather depends on when they get the next batch in. Of course, she is convinced her father made her immune. He died when she was a teenager and that was not yesterday. The nurse practitioner knows her and knows she has dementia, so I hope she is able to think on her feet as my attempts to persuade C it is a booster are so fat not making much difference.
 

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