1. Expert Q&A: Living well as a carer - Thurs 29 August, 3-4pm

    As a carer for a person living with dementia, the needs of the person you care for will often come before your own. You may experience a range of difficult emotions and you may not have the time to do all the things you need to do. Caring can have a big impact on both your mental and physical health, as well as your overall wellbeing.

    Angelo, our Knowledge Officer (Wellbeing) is our expert on this topic. He will be here to answer your questions on Thursday 29 August between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. MaryI

    MaryI Registered User

    Jul 27, 2016
    3
    My sister has early onset (diagnosed formally in 2016) - she was 54 at the time of diagnosis. We are very close so this is hard for me, but she lives in British Columbia (the left hand coast of Canada) - does anyone else have to sit and watch this happen at a distance? I'd love to talk to someone who does.

    She has lots of care there and is no longer able to speak much but likes to see me on Skype each week. It is an unusual situation but I can't be the only one out there!
     
  2. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    7,739
    Yorkshire
    hi @MaryI
    what a challenge for you ... sometimes modern technology is a real boon

    there are other members who have someone they care about in another country, so they may well see your post given a bit of time
     
  3. chickenlady

    chickenlady Registered User

    Feb 28, 2016
    94
    It doesn't matter if you're in Canada or just the other end of the country if you can't be with them when they need you it is really hard. My Dad was only a 4 hr drive away but it was hard to get to see him more than once a fortnight. Make the most of your Skype calls and plan your topics of conversation before you make the call so as to end on a cheery memory from your childhood. Best of luck to you.
     
  4. Sarahdun

    Sarahdun Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    348
    How hard for you. You don’t say what kind of care your sister has. If she is being looked after by other relatives perhaps the kindest and most rewarding thing you could do is arrange to spend two weeks looking after her yourself and give her regular carers a break.
     
  5. MaryI

    MaryI Registered User

    Jul 27, 2016
    3
    Thank you all for your thoughts. My sister lives at home with her husband and has daily care come in now - it took us a long time to be able to help as her husband could not ask. But I'm so glad he is now accepting as it means he too can make the most of his time with her. I visit each year but sadly won't make it in 2019. She can still sing songs which I find astonishing given that she is now prone to forget my name! I often set up You Tube and we sing together - it's something we did as children so that is consoling.

    Thanks again - sometimes I feel very angry and lost with it all. But having this forum helps.
     

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