Wandering about pacing and confusion at night

deepetshopboy

Registered User
Jul 7, 2008
238
can anyone tell me if theres any medicine i can get for my dad he has declined in last week getting up 5 times a night wandering about not wanting to be in hes bed saying it’s dangerous or cant sleep
He’s wandering about the house in the dark and coming into the living room in hes hat and coat night or sitting in the living room or attempting to sleep on the sofa in the same room as me im currently in the living room sleeping on a fold up bed its a new worrying development in a lone of things going on with him ive asked the gp but no joy going to ring the memory clinic not sure how much longer i can survive on 3/4 sleep interrupted each night
☹
 

love.dad.but..

Registered User
Jan 16, 2014
4,472
Kent
That was exactly how my dad became..agitated restless pacing through the night getting dressed ready to go out, his days and nights had flipped and recognition of the difference went. His GP didn't want to prescribe any medication which I understood because it can introduce or increase a risk of falls and dad was finding his way around at night. I left lights on the stairs and landing and just tried to make the house as safe as I could, I had moved in but 10 mths later the situation wasn't sustainable for me or dad. Having a night time pacer is very difficult and exhausting.
 

reedysue

Registered User
Nov 4, 2014
4,709
Scotland
can anyone tell me if theres any medicine i can get for my dad he has declined in last week getting up 5 times a night wandering about not wanting to be in hes bed saying it’s dangerous or cant sleep
He’s wandering about the house in the dark and coming into the living room in hes hat and coat night or sitting in the living room or attempting to sleep on the sofa in the same room as me im currently in the living room sleeping on a fold up bed its a new worrying development in a lone of things going on with him ive asked the gp but no joy going to ring the memory clinic not sure how much longer i can survive on 3/4 sleep interrupted each night
☹
My mum had a similar problem in that she did not feel safe in her bedroom, she was prescribed risperidone which has been very effective, she has been taking it for nearly 2 years with no problem.
 

deepetshopboy

Registered User
Jul 7, 2008
238
My mum had a similar problem in that she did not feel safe in her bedroom, she was prescribed risperidone which has been very effective, she has been taking it for nearly 2 years with no problem.
Ok is this prescribed by dr or memory clinic as they told me nothing they could do is it a anti anxiety tablet ?
Was or os there any major side effects ?
Sorry for questions
 

reedysue

Registered User
Nov 4, 2014
4,709
Scotland
Ok is this prescribed by dr or memory clinic as they told me nothing they could do is it a anti anxiety tablet ?
Was or os there any major side effects ?
Sorry for questions
Risperidone is an antipsychotic, it was prescribed for anxiety initially by our GP who referred mum back to the memory clinic where they agreed to continue it. Mum has had no side effects at all.
 

deepetshopboy

Registered User
Jul 7, 2008
238
Risperidone is an antipsychotic, it was prescribed for anxiety initially by our GP who referred mum back to the memory clinic where they agreed to continue it. Mum has had no side effects at all.
Thank u might need yet another trip to dr this week
 

BryanG2001

Registered User
Mar 2, 2014
105
A bit of a recent hobby horse for me, Doctors worrying about falls but completely missing the damage that lack of sleep causes to the PWD as well as the carers. Time to get a bit insistent with the Doctor, or ask them to come and do a night shift for you 4 times a week.
 

deepetshopboy

Registered User
Jul 7, 2008
238
Im currently giving him chemist bought herbal sleeping tablets seemed to work a treat 3x tabs a hour before bed .last resort no help from memory clinic been leaving messages and calling
I discussed again with dr when he called about my dads other medical issue and hes going to email the memory clininc its also a issue with my dad getting really restless on bus journeys and wringing hes hands nodding hes head ive really boticed people staring now and giving pitying looks
 

deepetshopboy

Registered User
Jul 7, 2008
238
A bit of a recent hobby horse for me, Doctors worrying about falls but completely missing the damage that lack of sleep causes to the PWD as well as the carers. Time to get a bit insistent with the Doctor, or ask them to come and do a night shift for you 4 times a week.
Yes i know think the issue could be more money related they don't want to give more medication
 

Roseleigh

Registered User
Dec 26, 2016
291
A bit of a recent hobby horse for me, Doctors worrying about falls but completely missing the damage that lack of sleep causes to the PWD as well as the carers. Time to get a bit insistent with the Doctor, or ask them to come and do a night shift for you 4 times a week.
I am lucky with my GP in this respect, his atttude is very much to give things a try, but the dementia nurse isn't the sharpest tool and wants to do everything rigidly by the book. I asked my GP for Mirtazapine for this problem of night time anxiety and it has helped a bit, but what seems to have helped even more is a small daily dose of laxative so that he has a bowel motion daily without fail. Strange but I've noticed often if he's getting agitated and hallucinating having a bowel action will help him to settle again.o_O
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,051
cornwall
I am lucky with my GP in this respect, his atttude is very much to give things a try, but the dementia nurse isn't the sharpest tool and wants to do everything rigidly by the book. I asked my GP for Mirtazapine for this problem of night time anxiety and it has helped a bit, but what seems to have helped even more is a small daily dose of laxative so that he has a bowel motion daily without fail. Strange but I've noticed often if he's getting agitated and hallucinating having a bowel action will help him to settle again.o_O
My dad has VD and has Mirtazapine 30mg .He is supposed to have Senna as well but refuses but should as he suffers from constipation.But Dad will get teasy if he needs the toilet.
 

BryanG2001

Registered User
Mar 2, 2014
105
My dad has VD and has Mirtazapine 30mg .He is supposed to have Senna as well but refuses but should as he suffers from constipation.But Dad will get teasy if he needs the toilet.
Bit off topic, but have experience here. You can maybe try Lactulose, it is a liquid and so goes very easily in to any drink, just tastes a bit sweet. You can buy Lactulose yourself from various pharmacies, if it works it can be prescribed so that you save the cost.
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,051
cornwall
Bit off topic, but have experience here. You can maybe try Lactulose, it is a liquid and so goes very easily in to any drink, just tastes a bit sweet. You can buy Lactulose yourself from various pharmacies, if it works it can be prescribed so that you save the cost.
He has Sennakot in liquid form.It is just according to him there is nothing wrong.He doesn’t need that muck.But he only goes every 8days..He will refuse any thing regardless ..But thank you anyway
 

Roseleigh

Registered User
Dec 26, 2016
291
He has Sennakot in liquid form.It is just according to him there is nothing wrong.He doesn’t need that muck.But he only goes every 8days..He will refuse any thing regardless ..But thank you anyway
Once in 8 days is unusually infrequent, and with all that old poo inside him can't help but wonder if it is either causing discomfort (bloating, or urge to have a bowel action), or the toxins from the decay affecting his damaged brain. Sennakot is an unusual laxative to prescribe in these circumstances as most drs would give a stool softener such as Laxido or Lactulose as Bryan mentioned. As it simply dissolves in water with just a sweet taste it would be very easy to disguise as a cold drink or even plain water.
Having found regular laxatives having a transformative effect on my OHs behaviour, I can't recommend them enough!!;)
 

LindyD

New member
May 17, 2019
5
Hail Rispiredone!! The wonder drug! My mom was anxious, hallucinating and believing there were people in the bedroom, hiding under the bed. She was paranoid. Mental health crisis team (IOPS) prescribed it. No problems now. She is very calm.
 

minet48

Registered User
May 23, 2014
46
I don't know enough about the link between the constipation and the night troubles, but I do know that lactulose really helped my mum. It is very gentle and like others have said, you can disguise it.
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,051
cornwall
Once in 8 days is unusually infrequent, and with all that old poo inside him can't help but wonder if it is either causing discomfort (bloating, or urge to have a bowel action), or the toxins from the decay affecting his damaged brain. Sennakot is an unusual laxative to prescribe in these circumstances as most drs would give a stool softener such as Laxido or Lactulose as Bryan mentioned. As it simply dissolves in water with just a sweet taste it would be very easy to disguise as a cold drink or even plain water.
Having found regular laxatives having a transformative effect on my OHs behaviour, I can't recommend them enough!!;)
Hi.Yes it is just we have tried the others including fibregel but still refuses..He has an an obstruction in the bowel which he denies.But I was there when the X-ray came back with the doctor and so was he..
His bowel habits have started to change and become slightly more frequent but about 5 days now. But to be honest I think he is becoming more incontinent..
 

BryanG2001

Registered User
Mar 2, 2014
105
Apologies if my suggestion caused confusion. As others have said I wasn't suggesting you just swap Lactulose for Senna, but that you can hide the Lactulose in various ways so that he won't even know he is taking it. This type of subterfuge doesn't sit well with everybody, but it works and would be in his best interests. Only going every 5 days risk fecal impaction or even damage to the colon. Fecal impaction can look very much like becoming incontinent because only liquid can get past the dried up lump of poo.

There are a lot of difficult parts to being a carer, I think one of the hardest is where you have to go from being the child in the relationship to being the parent.
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,051
cornwall
H
Apologies if my suggestion caused confusion. As others have said I wasn't suggesting you just swap Lactulose for Senna, but that you can hide the Lactulose in various ways so that he won't even know he is taking it. This type of subterfuge doesn't sit well with everybody, but it works and would be in his best interests. Only going every 5 days risk fecal impaction or even damage to the colon. Fecal impaction can look very much like becoming incontinent because only liquid can get past the dried up lump of poo.

There are a lot of difficult parts to being a carer, I think one of the hardest is where you have to go from being the child in the relationship to being the parent.
Hi .Dad is in the care home for respite for 2weeks so they have got the fight.Unless he has gone today we are on day 7..I don’t know if it is part of dementia but he holds on for as long as possible..But then sometimes he has an accident at night..
This is where again I don’t think he has “capacity “ as he is not understanding consequences.He definitely Is impacted but it is difficult to get past this .Especially with the doctor.