Walking ...

Discussion in 'I have dementia' started by Papa60, Dec 7, 2019.

  1. Papa60

    Papa60 New member

    Oct 17, 2019
    5
    Hello.
    I'm hoping to get some info'. I was diagnosed with Mixed Dementia last December unfortunately had to stop working at the end of June. I have been coping so far with poor balance (stopped cycling and running after a couple of tumbles) Just recently after being stood or walking for a short time my feet really hurt. Has anyone experienced this?
     
  2. Bunpoots

    Bunpoots Volunteer Host

    Apr 1, 2016
    3,606
    Nottinghamshire
    Welcome to Dementia Talking Point @Papa60.

    I’m sorry to read about your diagnosis. I don’t have dementia but have had very painful feet for about a year or so after only walking or standing for a short time. It was the balls of my feet that hurt and I eventually found that putting a soft insole in my shoes, or buying shoes with a decent padded insole, solved the problem. I don’t have anymore problems now.

    I put it down to age (I’m in my 50s) and being overweight.
     
  3. Papa60

    Papa60 New member

    Oct 17, 2019
    5
     
  4. Papa60

    Papa60 New member

    Oct 17, 2019
    5
    Hello Bunpoots.
    Thanks for your help. I've used gel inserts and have some very comfortable (were) shoes. I have burning feeling or pins and needles but times ten!!.
    I'm glad you found something that helps you...
     
  5. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,699
    south-east London
    Hi @Papa60 - this isn't something that my husband experienced but I came across three people staying in the same dementia hospital ward he attended at one point, who seemed to be experiencing something similar.

    All three were unkeen to have anything on their feet - often pulling off socks or slippers and shaking them out as they were convinced there was something like grit in them, making them uncomfortable.

    One of the nurses told me that in some people with dementia, the nerves in the feet, toes and fingertips can become extremely sensitive.

    Earlier this year I took part in a virtual dementia event which was aimed at helping people understand what a person diagnosed with dementia might be feeling. One of the first things they did was put a spiky insole in both my shoes to imitate that discomfort - and it wasn't pleasant.

    As I say, it wasn't something my husband ever complained of so I don't know if there is anything to help reduce the sensation, but it would be worth mentioning it to your GP to see if anything is available to deal with that particular problem.

    I hope so - it sounds very painful.
     
  6. 29Wilkia29

    29Wilkia29 New member

    Nov 12, 2019
    5
    Female
    Leeds
    Have you been tested for diabetes recently? Could be unrelated to dementia and needs checking by gp.
    Good luck
     
  7. Dimpsy

    Dimpsy Registered User

    Sep 2, 2019
    892
    Female
    My husband has painful feet, the doctor told him it could be 'balled sock syndrome' (Google).
    He also had aches in ankle and knee joints which were put down to long term use of statins. He was prescribed a different statin and takes one tablet every other day and the pains are by and large under control.
     
  8. Papa60

    Papa60 New member

    Oct 17, 2019
    5
     
  9. Papa60

    Papa60 New member

    Oct 17, 2019
    5
    Hello Lynn.
    Thanks for your message regarding painful feet.I thought i had heard about someone attending a similar event that you mentioned. My GP has suggested Moretons Syndrome i have an appointment with a consultant soon so may have an answer then. Thanks again and i wish you a happy new year
     
  10. Chalkie

    Chalkie Registered User

    Jan 19, 2018
    12
    I was diagnosed with mixed dementia nearly 2 years ago and sometimes experience loss of balance. My feet don't hurt but at night I sometimes have restless foot, (not leg), which keeps me awake. The only thing that helps is to put my feet out of the duvet so they cool down.
     

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