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Vocal and angry with carers

emmfurn

New member
Sep 23, 2018
4
Hi, I care for my dad who is in the later stages of alzheimers. He was in hospital for about 6 days about a month ago with pseudo gout and came home with yet another light switched off - we were unable to visit due to Covid and have little knowledge of what he experienced there sadly. Since returning from hospital he is receiving care 3 times a day as myself and my mum are unable to care for him now without help as he is unable to walk and toileting is an issue. My concerns are the noise he makes when the carers roll him to change him and hoist him. He is clearly very frightened and he gets very agitated and angry, telling them to 'stop it!' and crying out. I think it is fear of falling but would welcome any suggestions as very distressing. In between carers visits, he mostly sleeps, it is the moving around and hoisting him which makes him angry and agitated. He is 89. Many thanks
 

Hazara8

Registered User
Apr 6, 2015
502
Hi, I care for my dad who is in the later stages of alzheimers. He was in hospital for about 6 days about a month ago with pseudo gout and came home with yet another light switched off - we were unable to visit due to Covid and have little knowledge of what he experienced there sadly. Since returning from hospital he is receiving care 3 times a day as myself and my mum are unable to care for him now without help as he is unable to walk and toileting is an issue. My concerns are the noise he makes when the carers roll him to change him and hoist him. He is clearly very frightened and he gets very agitated and angry, telling them to 'stop it!' and crying out. I think it is fear of falling but would welcome any suggestions as very distressing. In between carers visits, he mostly sleeps, it is the moving around and hoisting him which makes him angry and agitated. He is 89. Many thanks
These procedures can be traumatic for those living with Alzheimer's or other dementias.
A person centred approach is essential in terms of Carers. I can but cite my own case in respect of my mother. At 99 and in hospital at end of life, l experienced one session of distress during " turning " and then intervened directly from thereon, with hand holding or hugging as the procedure took place. In short l applied COMFORT via my " familiar " voice and actual physical comforting combined. It worked.

Perhaps you can initiate calm during the procedures in a similar vein. None of this is ever easy. But the one living with Alzheimer's has no choice in the matter. If we can at least reduce anxiety and distress, then that is all to the good.

Best wishes.
 

emmfurn

New member
Sep 23, 2018
4
Thank you, I have, at times gone in when dad is distressed to try to calm him but this morning I am going to stay in from the start and see if it makes a difference. Much appreciated thank you.
 

Weasell

Registered User
Oct 21, 2019
533
I think you need to establish is it pain, fear Or resentment at the intervention?
Could he have fallen in hospital ? Or sustained an injury that you are not aware of ? Could he have an injury that causes Pain when he is moved?
Do you notice that he makes less fuss with certain Carers?
I suspect this is not possible but I will suggest it any way! We used to obtain medication for clients prior to medical interventions.
Is there any medication that could be given shortly before care commences? To relax him ?There will be a host of objections, eg addictive bla bla bla, but you could ask the doctor? I always work on the don’t ask don’t get principle!
One thing you could try is to administer 2x paracetamol 15 minutes before they arrive and see if there is any difference.
 

emmfurn

New member
Sep 23, 2018
4
Thank you for your replies. This morning I stayed in with dad and reassured him whilst watching what happened. I am convinced he is not in pain - the fear in his face is obvious when he is rolled or moved and that is when the shouting starts. The carers said he was much better with me there so we are going to continue this :) Have also started giving him calpol (when he will take it - he spits tablets out and medication is hit and miss). I have noticed that some carers are more reassuring than others - one was holding his other hand today and this seemed to help. i think he also feels safer with the larger men but we never know who we are going to get. I have booked a telephone appointment with the doctor too. Thank you for your help.
 

Banjomansmate

Registered User
Jan 13, 2019
2,078
Dorset
As his dementia increased The Banjoman always made a great fuss about anything physical that happened to him. The yells of pain were dreadful even when he was hardly being touched. I did wonder if he had heightened sensory responses to touch.
The last time I saw him, the day he took a downturn before he died, a couple of the Care home staff tried to get him to sit up a little so that we could see each other. When he started creating a fuss I held his hand (as best I could) and talked reassuringly to him as they moved him and he seemed to respond and quietened down appreciably.
 

emmfurn

New member
Sep 23, 2018
4
As his dementia increased The Banjoman always made a great fuss about anything physical that happened to him. The yells of pain were dreadful even when he was hardly being touched. I did wonder if he had heightened sensory responses to touch.
The last time I saw him, the day he took a downturn before he died, a couple of the Care home staff tried to get him to sit up a little so that we could see each other. When he started creating a fuss I held his hand (as best I could) and talked reassuringly to him as they moved him and he seemed to respond and quietened down appreciably.
Sounds very similar to my dad's behaviour - sometimes when I had him in the wheelchair he would cry out if his foot was just near something and not even touching. Sorry to hear the Banjoman passed away, it is nice you were able to comfort him at the end. Thank you for your response