Vehicle suggestions

Discussion in 'Equipment and technology' started by oilovlam, Feb 25, 2017.

  1. oilovlam

    oilovlam Registered User

    Aug 2, 2015
    388
    South East
    Mum is advanced (stage 6?) Alzheimers. Quite mobile. Gets into a Suzuki Jeep with a little help....but cannot manage a Ford Fiesta because the seats are low.

    I need to think about another vehicle....current one on last legs.

    What are other people using?
     
  2. CynthsDaugh

    CynthsDaugh Registered User

    May 5, 2015
    140
    Salford, Lancashire
    Hi Oilovlam

    I got a Kia Venga because it is a bit higher than a normal car. Mum has a bad back and she is comfortable in the passenger seat which she wasn't in a few others. It's a nice car to drive and the boot takes Mums wheelchair easily so is quite big, overall good value for money in my opinion.


    Sent from my iPad using Talking Point
     
  3. oilovlam

    oilovlam Registered User

    Aug 2, 2015
    388
    South East
    Thanks Cynth, I will have a look at the Kia Venga. I'm hoping they do a frugal petrol version. I don't need a motorway cruiser because it's just a mile up to the town a few times a week. I want to avoid diesel because I can see the government taxing them out of extistance.

    Having a wheelchair will become a necessity fairly soon I think.
     
  4. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    10,174
    Merseyside
    Have a look at the Vauxhall Meriva. It's higher & the back doors open the opposite way with a grab bar. It was brilliant for me getting my dad in & out plus the wheelchair fitted into the boot easily.
     
  5. oilovlam

    oilovlam Registered User

    Aug 2, 2015
    388
    South East
    Thanks Cat, I don't know the Meriva...I will add it to my list.

    I sometimes see Vauxhall cars and think they are good looking. The Astra was always a solid workhorse. But the sight of all those Zafira's catching fire and the way the company handled it (or didn't) will be difficult to remove from the decision making process.
     
  6. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    10,174
    Merseyside
    http://www.vauxhall.co.uk/vehicles/...gclid=CLSN9Jfjq9ICFVXnGwodoTEFoA&gclsrc=aw.ds
     
  7. Wheresmygin

    Wheresmygin Registered User

    Apr 4, 2016
    53
    Good question.
    I have a mini and although it's very low, it is easier for MiL to get into than husband's Passat because the seat is close to the side of the car. The Passat has such wide seats with such a wide cill that it's really difficult to get her in and out unless she's having a really good day.
    BiL has a ford people-carrier and she seems to be ok in that. Sorry, I don't know the model.

    Wheresmygin x
     
  8. cragmaid

    cragmaid Registered User

    Oct 18, 2010
    7,963
    North East England
    I have just recommended a Ford Ecosport to my BIL for the higher seat reason. The boot opens sideways rather than up which was kinder for the sore shoulders, and the 1l1tre ecoboost engine is tremendous.

    No shares in Ford here, just appreciate their design.
     
  9. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,761
    Salford
    Citroen Berlingo gets my vote. High up, high seats and the back doors slide open giving a massive space to get in and out. The sliding doors mean you don't have to get halfway in the car to help someone out and in car parks where space is tight not having to worry about the door hitting the car next to you is really handy too.
    K
     
  10. LadyA

    LadyA Registered User

    Oct 19, 2009
    13,510
    Ireland
    I drive a Kia picanto. The seats are a bit difficult to get in and out of - and the boot is positively miniscule. However, with the back shelf out, the boot space is very high. I fit a foldable walking frame in with no problems. But I used to have to help my husband up out of the front seat.
    At some stage in the future I'm probably going to have to go for an automatic. I have a damaged shoulder, and sometimes, the muscles go into painful spasms which makes it really difficult when trying to control the steering wheel with that arm while changing gears.

    Sent from my Moto G Play using Talking Point mobile app
     
  11. Soobee

    Soobee Registered User

    Aug 22, 2009
    2,734
    South
    mum had an Astra fitted with a turnable passenger seat (it turned around 90 degrees). It enabled her to get in and out more easily with her dementia for a little while. The seats are not cheap but they do make it much easier.

    Another person I know who've had their hips done, have got a Vauxhall Meriva. The doors open differently and it makes it far easier to get out of the car.
     
  12. Tin

    Tin Registered User

    May 18, 2014
    4,829
    UK
    I have a Ford same design, the rear sliding doors and the extra height are perfect and great for me too, I have a continue back problem. She simply swings her legs round and steps out, no rear door half way open so as to hinder getting out. Not tried to put a wheel chair in there yet, but dealer said yes.
     
  13. oilovlam

    oilovlam Registered User

    Aug 2, 2015
    388
    South East
    Thanks to everyone for the suggestions, very much appreciated. I have been thinking of getting a second hand vehicle with a ramp...the full monty (no naked northeners!). But I don't think I need that.....I think when mum has trouble getting in the car she will be effectively housebound. Then the doctor can come to us!!

    So the suggestions are perfect. Hopefully with a little help....leverage in the right place, I can get mum into a newish car.

    I'm thinking of taking her to a dealer to try getting her into various cars.

    Me: Mum, are you dry? I don't want you messing up the nice new car
    Mum: No...(which either means Yes or No)
    Dealer: (a worried look on his/her face) Do you need any help.....please don't pee on the seat.
    Me: Do these seats wipe clean easily?
     
  14. Soobee

    Soobee Registered User

    Aug 22, 2009
    2,734
    South
    That gave me a wry smile. What about taking a Kylie sheet with you that she can sit on whilst trying the cars?

    I mean a seat pad, I think.
     
  15. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,761
    Salford
    The problem is that appointments like hospital ones won't and it means you may not be able to get out as often yourself.
    This is the sort of thing I was thinking of for example.
    K

    http://www.exchangeandmart.co.uk/us...lchair-access-vehicle-only-19k-miles-19536121
     
  16. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,650
    North West
    So why not have a look at some wheelchair accessible vehicles? They often have a passenger seat in the front plus one or more seats behind as well as ramp, enough space and all the belts for a wheelchair.

    We have a converted Citroen Berlingo and it enabled us to once again take my wife to activities like 'Singing for the Brain'. She is now in a nursing home and much less flexible (AD and Parkinson's) but is still hoisted into her wheelchair every day for few hours so we are hoping that when the weather is better we may be able to take her out in the car again.

    Just google 'wheelchair accessible vehicles' and the area you live in and you should be able to see what's available.
     
  17. oilovlam

    oilovlam Registered User

    Aug 2, 2015
    388
    South East
    Kevinl, I have looked at wheelchair accessible vehicles. Sometimes the ramps can be very long which isn't always practicable even with a Blue Badge.

    Do a lot of 'home' carers get these sorts of vehicles? Or do they 'make do' with an 'ordinary' car (albeit carefully chosen) and a foldable wheelchair in the boot?

    Thanks for the link btw.

    Hospital appointments could be an issue in the future. Are there other ways to get to hospital for people who don't have a suitable car....will an ambulance collect?
     
  18. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,650
    North West
    I think that depends entirely on the PWD. You have to decide whether the risks involved in the transfers to and from the wheelchair are acceptable.
     
  19. nitram

    nitram Registered User

    Apr 6, 2011
    18,935
    Male
    North Manchester
    "Are there other ways to get to hospital for people who don't have a suitable car....will an ambulance collect?"

    Some form of appropriate patient transfer is usually available. It is booked via the GP.
    Quite often it is a minibus with driver, escort, and a platform lift. The bus does a round of pickups, drops people off and returns later to pick them up, there can be a lot of waiting around at the hospital.
     
  20. stanleypj

    stanleypj Registered User

    Dec 8, 2011
    10,650
    North West
    The ramp shown here is not very long. This vehicle is a diesel but I know that there are some petrol conversions of various makes available.
     

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